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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 339 107 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 78 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 64 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 47 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 44 6 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 40 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 34 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 27 1 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 26 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1.. You can also browse the collection for Savannah, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) or search for Savannah, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The battle of Shiloh. (search)
the day at Pittsburg, and returned by boat to Savannah in the evening. I was intending to remove my. He was expected daily, and would come in at Savannah. I remained, therefore, a few days longer th, with a division of Buell's army, arrived at Savannah, and I ordered him to move up the east bank oearned that General Buell himself would be at Savannah the next day, and desired to meet me on his ahim of the reason why I could not meet him at Savannah. On the way up the river I directed the dispre severely wounded.-editors. sick in bed at Savannah, some nine miles below, but in hearing of ouratch-boat used to run between the landing and Savannah. It was brief, and related specially to his tenden's and McCook's, came up the river from Savannah in the transports, and were on the west bank 6th from a point ten or twelve miles east of Savannah, over bad roads. The men had also lost rest t they left a point twenty-two miles east of Savannah on the morning of the 6th. From the heavy ra[1 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Shiloh reviewed. (search)
neral Halleck's troops and mine was arranged, Savannah, on the east bank of the river, was designateate command of the troops, and his arrival at Savannah on the 17th of March, he converted the expedi General Grant continued his headquarters at Savannah, leaving General Sherman with a sort of contrittsburg Landing. Sherman's The Landing at Savannah, nine miles below (North of) Pittsburg Landin at once to communicate with General Smith at Savannah, and learn his situation. When the cavalrant were notified that I would concentrate at Savannah on Sunday and Monday, the 6th and 7th, the dimbia on the evening of the 3d, and arrived at Savannah on the evening of the 5th with my chief of st Crittenden's division, which was coming into Savannah as I left, I proposed that we should go ashormight soon be expected by the wagon-road from Savannah, etc. This statement, ridiculous and absuof the advance of the Army of the Ohio toward Savannah, General Sidney Johnston determined to antici[5 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 12.46 (search)
d to support the first and intermingled with it. Johnston's original plan is summed up in the following dispatch to President Davis: Corinth, April 3d, 1862. General Buell in motion thirty thousand strong, rapidly from Columbia by Clifton to Savannah. Mitchel behind him with ten thousand. Confederate forces forty thousand--ordered forward to offer battle near Pittsburg. Division from Bethel, main body from Corinth, reserve from Burnsville, converging to-morrow near Monterey on Pittsburg. ,232, and present for duty 41,543. but at Crump's Landing, five or six miles distant, was General Lew Wallace's division with 8820 present, and 7771 men present for duty. [see page 538.] General Nelson's division of Buell's army had arrived at Savannah on Saturday morning, and was now about five miles distant; Crittenden's division also had arrived on the morning of the 6th. So that Grant, with these three divisions, may be considered as having about 22,000 men in immediate reserve, without
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 12.47 (search)
record as a consummate engineer at Charleston and Savannah, Drewry's Bluff and Petersburg. On the 25th ofivisions (reinforced a few days later) had reached Savannah, twelve miles below Pittsburg Landing, on the easthed at Donelson. One division, without landing at Savannah, was dispatched, under General W. T. Sherman, to ehe same day to General Grant, who had just reached Savannah, General Sherman stated that he was strongly impreday General Grant directed all the other troops at Savannah except one division to be immediately sent to the 30,000 strong, rapidly from Columbia by Clifton to Savannah. Mitchel behind him with 10,000. Confederate forcaving visited the encampment of Colonel Ammen near Savannah, General Grant informed that officer that water tr. X., Part I., p. 331. Further, even when leaving Savannah the next morning, General Grant scarcely at first s and our own; Crittenden's division, carried from Savannah by water and disembarked at midnight, was forced t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The March of Lew Wallace's division to Shiloh. (search)
The March of Lew Wallace's division to Shiloh. Circumstances and character of the order. As General Grant passed up from Savannah on the Tigress on the 6th of April to the battle-field of Shiloh, he found General Lew Wallace awaiting him at Crump's Landing, the troops of his division having been ordered under arms at the sound of the battle. [For General Grant's statements, see pages 467-8.] General Wallace in his official report places the hour at which General Grant reached Crump's athe route in 1884, estimates it at between 13 and 14 miles. Not considering the comparative difficulties of the two marches, the map indicates little difference in the speed of Wallace's division and that of Nelson's leading brigade (Ammen) from Savannah to Pittsburg Landing (1:30 to 5). Ammen in his diary dwells on the extreme difficulties of his route, which lay largely through swamps impassable by artillery. Documents submitted by General Wallace. I. Letter found on the person of Gen