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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 339 107 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 78 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 64 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 47 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 44 6 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 40 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 34 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 27 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 26 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Savannah, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) or search for Savannah, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 8: the siege and capture of Fort Donelson. (search)
zed arms and other Confederate property in several places, and caused the flight of a considerable number of troops from Savannah, on the eastern bank of the river, which he had prepared to attack. His reconnoissance was a perfect success. It discoces were crowded with men, women, and children, who greeted the old flag with the greatest enthusiasm. I was assured at Savannah, he said, that, of the several hundred troops there, more than one-half, had we gone to the attack in time, would have he of 250,000 military letters per day. It is believed that this number was exceeded after General Sherman's army reached Savannah, and up to the time of the review of the troops in this city in the month of May, 1865. Taking into consideration, co touched at points not always previously designated. During all this time, from Chattanooga to Atlanta, from Atlanta to Savannah, and in the homeward campaign across the Carolinas, you, my dear Colonel, have received the warmest thanks from officers
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 10: General Mitchel's invasion of Alabama.--the battles of Shiloh. (search)
ty-sixth Ohio, Colonel Worthington) landed at Savannah, March 10, 1862. the capital of Hardin Count the west side of the river, four miles above Savannah, and thence sixteen miles westward to Purdy, ted site of a commercial river-town, to rival Savannah, below it, and Hamburg, above it. The only bu march southward overland and join Grant's at Savannah. It was not until the 28th of March, when Gr communications between Pittsburg Landing and Savannah. The latter was made the depot of stores, to kind. From the time of Grant's arrival at Savannah March 17, 1862. until the first week in Aprimander-in-chief continued his Headquarters at Savannah; and there seemed to be very little apprehens Smith was then so ill at his Headquarters at Savannah that he could not take the field. In passingk of his army. It is proper to remember that Savannah was the point toward which his expected re-enittenden's division which had just arrived at Savannah. These, and the remainder of Nelson's divisi[3 more...]