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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 339 107 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 78 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 64 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 47 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 44 6 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 40 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 34 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 27 1 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 26 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott). You can also browse the collection for Savannah, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) or search for Savannah, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 24 results in 2 document sections:

bly co-operate with the movement from Savannah, Hardin County. My cavalry, a part of which stilleft at 6 o'clock this morning. Enemy were at Savannah last night with thirty-three transports and t P. S.--From best information there are at Savannah sixty-five boats; fifty-seven landed yesterdale. The enemy are assembling large forces at Savannah, threatening an attack near Bethel and Purdy.n the other side of the river. The forces at Savannah variously estimated at from 100 men to 30,000umn from Columbus on Memphis. The roads from Savannah to Florence very bad. River very high. No apo Bethel [Station] is to defend the road from Savannah to Bolivar, and to guard and protect, as far 0 strong, rapidly from Columbia by Clifton to Savannah; Mitchel behind him with 10,000. Confederate ove from here, then direct to Mickey's on the Savannah road. I give you this information that you mleft to guard the road from Mickey's house to Savannah. Permit no delay when once this movement sha[10 more...]
Brigadier-General. P. S.--Insert in the dispatch to General Halleck, if it is not started The force moving toward Savannah is said to number 26,000. General orders, no. 7. Hdqrs. Department of the Mississippi, Saint Louis, March 19, 1862e we lose the Mississippi Valley and probably our cause; whereas we could even afford to lose for a while Charleston and Savannah for the purpose of defeating Buell's army, which would not only insure us the Valley of the Mississippi, but our indepene troops of this department the death of Maj. Gen. Charles F. Smith, who at 4 o'clock p. m. to-day departed this life at Savannah, on the Tennessee River. General Smith had been in the service of his country for more than forty years, and had passhis it will be probably best to keep a considerable force at Columbia and Murfreesborough. Our lines from Columbia to Savannah must be kept open. The provost guard at Nashville should not be removed and a force should be kept near that city. It