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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 44 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 43 1 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 20 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 10 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 10 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 9 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the Confederate States Navy. (search)
nder Pinckney, also arrived. Our gun-boats after landing from New Madrid, took a position at Tiptonville, a point 30 miles below No. 10, by the river, but only four miles by land. It was therefore an important point. We had been at Tiptonville but a few days, when early one morning we perceived a number of men on the opposite side of the river from us, engaged in throwing down a large pile oft request of the commander of our troops at Island 10, one of our gun-boats was sent up to to Tiptonville with supplies every night, and though the enemy's batteries fired at them regularly, not one formation that the tin-clad was ferrying the men of General Pope's army over to a point above Tiptonville, and the general commanding at No. 10, urged Commodore Hollins to attack the gun-boat with his fleet, for if the enemy got possession of Tiptonville, and the road by which supplies were sent to No. 10, the evacuation or capture of that place was certain. Commodore Hollins declined to comply
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Western flotilla at Fort Donelson, Island number10, Fort Pillow and — Memphis. (search)
r, Colonel J. L. Kirby Smith of the 43d Ohio, and Captain Louis H. Marshall of General Pope's staff on board, made a reconnoissance twenty miles down, nearly to Tiptonville, the enemy's forts firing on her all the way down. We returned their fire, and dropped a few shells into their camps beyond. On the way back, we captured and e hammock nettings. He had two rifles, which he soon dropped, fleeing into the woods with his head down. The next day he was captured and brought into camp at Tiptonville, with the tip of his nose shot off. After the capture of this battery, the enemy prepared to evacuate his positions on Island Number10 and the adjacent shores, and provisions, without the loss of a man on our side. On the 12th the Benton (flag-steamer), with the Cincinnati, Mound City, Cairo, and St. Louis, passed Tiptonville and signaled the Carondelet and Pittsburgh to follow. Five Confederate gun-boats came up the next day and offered battle; but after the exchange of a few shots
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Sawing out the channel above Island number10. (search)
except by way of slightly widening a large break in the levee, and those who speak of working waist-deep in the water knew nothing of it. The enemy held Island Number10 and the left bank opposite, and the same bank from New Madrid down to Tiptonville, a ridge of high land between the back swamp and the river. In rear of their position was Reelfoot Lake and the overflow, extending from above them to a point below Tiptonville. Escape by land was impossible, New Madrid and the right bank beTiptonville. Escape by land was impossible, New Madrid and the right bank below being occupied by General Pope. The gun-boats under Foote held the river above, and our heavy batteries commanded the only place of debarkation below. Having accomplished this much, the problem for General Pope to solve was to cross his army to make an attack, for which purpose he judged that two gun-boats, to be used as ferry-boats, would be sufficient. The general was so confident that his letter to Foote would bring the boats that he directed me to go back to the fleet at Island Numbe
letters, many containing valuable information regarding the strength and position of the rebels. From these letters Gen. Dumont learned that a number of spies were at Nashville and Edgefield, Tenn., and had them arrested.--National Intelligencer, April 10. The National gunboat Carondelet under the command of Capt. Walke, having on board Gen. Granger, Col. Smith, of the Forty-third regiment of Ohio Volunteers, and Capt. Lewis H. Marshall, Aid to Gen. Pope, made a reconnoissance to Tiptonville, Mo., the object being to draw the fire from the masked batteries of the rebels along the Mississippi River. On her way up the river the Carondelet attacked a battery, and, Capt. Marshall, accompanied by a party of soldiers of the Twenty-seventh Illinois regiment, landed, spiked the guns, destroyed the carriages, and threw the ammunition into the river.--N. Y. Commercial, April 9. Yesterday an expedition from General Mitchel's command, consisting of two companies of the Fourth Ohio cav
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 9: events at Nashville, Columbus, New Madrid, Island number10, and Pea Ridge. (search)
orward movement. On the morning of the 6th, Pope sent the Carondelet down the river toward Tiptonville, with General Granger, Colonel Smith, of the Forty-third Ohio, and Captain L. B. Marshall, ofdown the river with the two gun-boats to silence batteries near Watson's Landing, below Tiptonville (Tennessee), where Pope intended to disembark his troops (then on the steamers that had passed throamilton, who had come down by land, to cross their divisions. He pushed his troops on toward Tiptonville as fast as they were landed. They met and drove back the Confederates, who were attempting to fly toward Union City. These were joined at Tiptonville that night by many fugitives from Island Number10. The wildest confusion prevailed among them. They were driven to the swamps by Pope's ad, and those who had fled in that direction expected to find shelter behind the batteries near Tiptonville. There had been grave doubts in the minds of the commanders on the island concerning their a
nough in the whole fleet for a fight of three hours. He also says that the enemy now has a battery 8 or 10 miles below Tiptonville, and that communication with Tiptonville is effectually cut off by it. This isolates our army on Island 10 from all heTiptonville is effectually cut off by it. This isolates our army on Island 10 from all help, and as the river now overflows all the land below Tiptonville as far as Reelfoot Lake, there is no retreat for our forces on Island 10 in case they are attacked by overwhelming forces. Can they thus attack us? I fear from all the rumors currenTiptonville as far as Reelfoot Lake, there is no retreat for our forces on Island 10 in case they are attacked by overwhelming forces. Can they thus attack us? I fear from all the rumors current that they design throwing a large force on the Tennessee shore from New Madrid, landing as far above Tiptonville as they can, so as to elude our gunboats, and then moving on our rear while their gunboats attack us in front. If our gunboats get ouTiptonville as they can, so as to elude our gunboats, and then moving on our rear while their gunboats attack us in front. If our gunboats get out of ammunition, as they must in a few more fights or harmless bombardments, this crossing the river on rafts or launches can easily be effected, and our men and guns all lost. When I wrote of the perilous position which our troops held at New Ma
10 on the 15th. Two days later, a general attack was made, with five gunboats and four mortarboats; but, though maintained for nine hours, it did very little damage. Beauregard telegraphed to Richmond April 1. that our vessels had thrown 3,000 shells, expended 50 tons of powder, and had killed but one of his men, without damaging his batteries. He soon left for Corinth, April 5. ceding the command /un> at No. 10 to Map showing the relative positions of Island no.10, New Madrid, Tiptonville, etc. Brig.-Gen. Makall, who assumed it in a bombastic proclamation. Meantime, Gen. Pope's engineers were quietly engaged in cutting a canal, 12 miles long, across the Missouri peninsula, opposite No. 10, through which steamboats and barges were safely transferred to the river below the Rebel stronghold; while two of our heavier gunboats succeeded in passing the island The Carondelet, April 4, and the Pittsburg, April 6. in a heavy fog. Gen. Pope, thus relieved from all peril from
idge, Tenn. 8 Belmont, Mo. (7 Cos.) 37 Resaca, Ga. 4 Farmington, Miss. 5 New Hope Church, Ga. 3 Stone's River, Tenn. 43 Place unknown 2 Chickamauga, Ga. 42     Present, also, at the Siege of Corinth; Mew Madrid; Island No.10; Tiptonville; Rocky Face Ridge; Adairsville. notes.--Organized at Belleville, May 11, 1861; mustered in June 25th, and left the State July 11, proceeding to Bird's Point, Mo. On the 19th of August following, five companies made a successful night attack May 22d 5 5   10 Siege of Vicksburg, Miss. 2 10   12 Missionary Ridge, Tenn. 15 34 4 53 Sherman's March, Ga. 1   1 2 The Carolinas 1 2   3   Totals 67 198 7 272 Present, also, at New Madrid, Mo.; Island No.10, Mo.; Tiptonville, Mo.; Farmington, Miss.; Siege of Corinth, Miss.; Raymond, Miss.; Siege of Jackson, Miss.; Lookout Mountain, Tenn.; Savannah, Ga.; Salkahatchie, S. C.; Neuse River, N. C. notes.--Recruited in the fall of 1861. In March, 1862, it joined Pop
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 12 (search)
anal from a point above Island Number10 to New Madrid below, by which he interposed between the rebel army and its available line of supply and retreat. At the very time that we were fighting the bloody battle on the Tennessee River, General Pope and Admiral Foote were bombarding the batteries on Island Number10, and the Kentucky shore abreast of it; and General Pope having crossed over by steamers a part of his army to the east bank, captured a large part of this rebel army, at and near Tiptonville. General Halleck still remained at St. Louis, whence he gave general directions to the armies of General Curtis, General Grant, and General Pope; and instead of following up his most important and brilliant successes directly down the Mississippi, he concluded to bring General Pope's army around to the Tennessee, and to come in person to command there. The gunboat fleet pushed on down the Mississippi, but was brought up again all standing by the heavy batteries at Fort Pillow, about f
-was completed by Col. Bissell's Engineer regiment, and four steamers were brought through on the night of the sixth. The heavy batteries I had thrown up below Tiptonville completely commanded the lowest point of the high ground on the Tennessee shore, entirely cutting off the enemy's retreat by water; his retreat by land has nevegh heavy timber, which had to be sawed off by hand four feet under water. The enemy has lined the opposite shore with batteries, extending from Island Ten to Tiptonville, Merriweather Landing, to prevent the. passage of the river by this army. I directed Capt. Walker to run down with the two gunboats at daylight on the seventaccident. As soon as we commenced to cross, the enemy began to evacuate Island No.10 and his batteries along the shore. The divisions were pushed forward to Tiptonville as fast as they landed, Paine's leading. The enemy was driven before him, and although they made several attempts to form in line of battle and make a stand, P
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