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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 68 28 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 64 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 39 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 18 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 17 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 16 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 16 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 11 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 7 1 Browse Search
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1. General: I informed you by telegraph, on the 12th, that, in consequence of information received from General Buckner of the advance of the enemy in considerable force, I had ordered forward all my available force to his support. Hardee's division and Terry's regiment have arrived. Here, and in advance, our force may be estimated at 12,000 men. Correct returns cannot be obtained until after a little organization. Two Tennessee regiments (Stanton's from Overton County, and one from Union City) are yet to arrive, and may reach this in two or three days, and give an increase of about 2,000 men. I cannot expect immediately any additional force under the call of last month on the Governors of Tennessee and Mississippi. The men will doubtless present themselves promptly at the rendezvous, but I cannot suppose any considerable portion will be armed. When I made the call, I hoped that some might come armed; I cannot now conjecture how many will do so. The call was made to sa
laves for this purpose had been responded to slowly and feebly, as has been shown. The condition of the Confederates in that quarter may be understood from an extract from a letter of General Polk to General Johnston, dated January 11, 1862: My available force is greatly reduced by sickness and absence . . . There are many regiments in my division who are without arms, and several poorly armed. The unarmed regiments are stationed at Forts Pillow, Donelson, and Henry; at Trenton, Union City, and Henderson Station. In my return you will find embraced the brigade of Brigadier-General Alcorn. His men are sixty-day troops from Mississippi, who are armed with every variety of weapon. They are sick with measles, raw, and undisciplined. This brigade cannot be expected to be very effective. I also send you a weekly report of the troops at this post, and am sorry to remark that they have been much reduced by sickness. My effective force is now, as you will see, only about 12,
No.10, and Humboldt. Polk issued the preliminary orders February 25th, for the evacuation, which was completed on March 2d. General Beauregard selected Brigadier-General J. P. McCown, an old army-officer, for the command of Island No.10, forty miles below Columbus, whither he removed his division February 27th. A. P. Stewart's brigade was also sent to New Madrid. Some 7,500 troops were assembled at these points. The remainder of the forces marched by land, under General Cheatham, to Union City. The quarters and buildings were committed to the flames; and at 3 P. Ir., March 2d, General Polk followed the retiring column from the abandoned stronghold. Polk says in his report: The enemy's cavalry — the first of his forces to arrive after the evacuation-reached Columbus in the afternoon next day, twenty-four hours after the last of our troops had left. In five days we moved the accumulations of six months, taking with us all our commissary and quartermaster's stores — an
ynchburgh by rail to Manassas station. April having passed, and the intentions of General Scott not being as yet developed, it was conjectured that operations might commence simultaneously at different points. Troops were therefore sent to Union City, (Kentucky,) near Cairo, on the Mississippi, and to Columbus, (Kentucky,) on the same river; the latter place being the last station of the Mobile and Ohio Railroad, and of great importance in many ways. Troops were also hurriedly despatched tng and yelling to us as they passed swiftly onward. The Washington artillery (four companies) from New-Orleans had gone the day before, and we almost envied them their trip to Richmond. We were much afraid the War Department would order us to Union City; but one evening as we sat chatting round our camp fires, the agreeable order was given-Strike tents! Pack up for Virginia, boys! Such rejoicing, such confusion, such hilarity, and obstreperous behavior as characterized our camps on the rec
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 12.47 (search)
or that were to be apprehended from him after the series of most serious disasters for the Confederate arms which had characterized the month of February, 1862. About seven thousand men were now placed at New Madrid, and in the quarter of Island Number10, under the command of General McCown, while the rest of General Polk's force was withdrawn along the line of the Mobile and Ohio railroad as far south as Humboldt, and there held in observation, with a small detachment of infantry left at Union City, and some five hundred cavalry thrown well out toward Hickman, on the Mississippi below Columbus, and extending across to the Tennessee River in the quarter of Paris, to watch and report all material movements upon either river. Reliable information reached me that while General Pope was on his march on the Missouri side of the Mississippi, to strike at New Madrid, such was the urgency of the danger impending by way of the Tennessee River that it threatened the fatal hindrance of the c
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The military situation-plans for the campaign-sheridan assigned to command of the cavalry-flank movements-forrest at Fort Pillow-General Banks's expedition-colonel Mosby-an incident of the Wilderness campaign (search)
e started with. All idea of adopting this latter plan was abandoned when the limited quantity of supplies possible to take with us was considered. The country over which we would have to pass was so exhausted of all food or forage that we would be obliged to carry everything with us. While these preparations were going on the enemy was not entirely idle. In the West Forrest made a raid in West Tennessee up to the northern border, capturing the garrison of four or five hundred men at Union City, and followed it up by an attack on Paducah, Kentucky, on the banks of the Ohio. While he was able to enter the city he failed to capture the forts or any part of the garrison. On the first intelligence of Forrest's raid I telegraphed Sherman to send all his cavalry against him, and not to let him get out of the trap he had put himself into. Sherman had anticipated me by sending troops against him before he got my order. Forrest, however, fell back rapidly, and attacked the troops a
the possession of the rebels. It had previously been buried by Colonel Mulligan, but was unearthed by the enemy. The brave Colonel wept like a child when he found himself compelled to surrender.--(Doc. 33.) The rebels troops evacuated Mayfield, Ky., this day. They numbered about seven thousand, under the command of General Cheatham, were nearly all armed, but poorly clothed and indifferently fed. Mayfield is a small town, the seat of Graves County, on the railroad from Paducah to Union City, and midway between the two places. It is about thirty-six miles east of Columbus, Ky.--Chicago Tribune. A Federal scouting party from the Thirty-fourth N. Y. regiment at Darnestown, Md., went across the Potomac near the mouth of the Seneca, and were attacked by a superior party of the rebels. One of the Nationals was killed outright and several were wounded; one of the latter was shot through the cheek, but fled, pursued by the attacking party; on reaching a creek he threw off his
uth, consisting of the States of South-Carolina, Georgia and Florida.--(Doc. 111.) Col. Buford, of the Twenty-seventh Illinois, accompanied by his regiment, the Forty-second Illinois, the Douglas Brigade, Col. Roberts, and four hundred of the Fifteenth Wiconsin, Col. Heg, (Scandinavian,) all from Island No.10, and two companies of the Second Illinois cavalry, Colonel Hogg, and a detachment of artillery, the last two from Hickman, Ky., made a reconnoissance in force and descent upon Union City, Tenn; and after a forced march of twenty-four hours, discovered a large force of rebel cavalry and infantry, under the notorious Clay King. The cavalry dashed into the place at a furious rate. The utmost consternation seized the rebels, and they fled in every direction. Several of them were killed, and about one hundred taken prisoners; one hundred and fifty horses were captured, a large amount of forage and spoils, and several secession flags. The National forces returned to Hickman aft
d other valuable information, the command was withdrawn, by the way of Germanna Ford, to the other side of the river, where the prisoners and other captures had been previously forwarded.--Richmond Enquirer. A detachment, composed of companies G, H, I, and K, of the Fifty-eighth regiment of Illinois infantry, with a portion of the Second Illinois cavalry, under the command of Captain Franklin B. Moore, pursued Faulkner's rebel partisans to a point on Obion River, four miles from Union City, Tennessee, where, in attempting to cross the river, the rebels were fired on, and eleven of their number killed. The Nationals captured fifty-three prisoners, a wagon-load of small-arms, thirty-three horses, and four mules. Their casualties were one man wounded and five horses shot.--large and spirited meetings were held in all the wards in Boston, Mass., last night, to encourage volunteering. Committees were appointed, and the work was pursued with energy. A similar movement was made in c
d in Brazos River, Texas, by the United States steamer Penobscot.--Colonel Richardson, the noted rebel guerrilla, was captured at a point below Rushville, south of the Cumberland River.--A detachment of the Seventh Tennessee cavalry, which left Union City yesterday in pursuit of guerrillas, just before daylight this morning came up with a squad of rebels at Dukedom, about fifteen miles from Union City, and dispersed them; captured one prisoner, four horses, four revolvers, one carbine, and some n City yesterday in pursuit of guerrillas, just before daylight this morning came up with a squad of rebels at Dukedom, about fifteen miles from Union City, and dispersed them; captured one prisoner, four horses, four revolvers, one carbine, and some of the clothing of the entire party.--General Judson Kilpatrick, in command of a considerable body of National cavalry, left Stevensburgh, Va., for the purpose of surprising the city of Richmond, and releasing the Union prisoners there.--(Doc. 134.)
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