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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 68 28 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 64 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 39 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 18 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 17 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 16 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 16 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 11 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 7 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Union City (Tennessee, United States) or search for Union City (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 3 document sections:

Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 3: military operations in Missouri and Kentucky. (search)
Russey, Polk's aid-de-camp, telegraphed to the same officer, that the general-commanding determines, with troops now at Union City, to fall at once upon Columbus ; and directed Pillow to take his whole command immediately to Island No.10. This was din Kentucky. As the rebel troops, driven out of Missouri, had invaded Kentucky in considerable force, and by occupying Union City, Hickman, and Columbus, were preparing to seize Paducah and Cairo, I judged it impossible, without losing important advHarris, dated at Nashville, September 6, 1S61, in which he says: The following dispatch is received this morning, dated Union City, 12 P. M., Sept. 5, 1861, directed to Governor Harris:-- On last evening I had the honor of telegraphing to you thorders to that effect, had the gratification to receive from the President the following dispatch, viz.: General Polk, Union City — Your telegram received. The necessity must justify the act. Signed, Jefferson Davis. Leonidas Polk, Major-General
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 9: events at Nashville, Columbus, New Madrid, Island number10, and Pea Ridge. (search)
n the 1st of March. General Stuart's brigade went by steamer to New Madrid, and the remainder marched by land to Union City, in Tennessee, This is at the intersection of the Nashville and Northwestern and the Mobile and Ohio Railways; the former lIllinois cavalry, went to Hickman on the gun-boat Louisville. They landed quietly, and soon afterward pushed on toward Union City, an important point at the junction of railways south of Columbus, occupied by a Confederate force composed of the Twenl suddenly upon their enemies and scattered them at the first onset. After burning their camp, and effectually purging Union City of armed insurgents, the Nationals returned to Hickman and re-embarked for Island Number10. While Commodore Foote wd Tiptonville as fast as they were landed. They met and drove back the Confederates, who were attempting to fly toward Union City. These were joined at Tiptonville that night by many fugitives from Island Number10. The wildest confusion prevailed
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 20: events West of the Mississippi and in Middle Tennessee. (search)
uisville; and for a fortnight before the battle of Murfreesboro he had been raiding through that region, much of the time with impunity, destroying railway tracks and bridges, attacking small National forces, and threatening and capturing posts. He crossed the Tennessee at Clifton, in the upper part of Wayne County, on the 13th of December, and, moving rapidly toward Jackson, seriously menaced that post. Sweeping northward, destroying tracks and bridges, he captured Humbolt, Trenton, and Union City, and menaced Columbus, the Headquarters of General Sullivan. At Trenton Forrest captured and paroled seven hundred troops, Dec. 20, 1862. under Colonel Jacob Fry, making the number of his paroled prisoners since he crossed the river about one thousand. On his return he was struck at Parker's Cross Roads, between Huntington and Lexington, first by a force of sixteen hundred men, under Colonel C. L. Dunham, and then by General Sullivan, Dec. 31. who came suddenly upon the raiders with