Your search returned 38 results in 13 document sections:

1 2
as no lack of the larger game. On the prairie grazed long lines of deer, marshaled like the open files of a cavalry brigade; and in the woods a fat bear was a frequent victim. Panthers and wild-cats were often met with. I remember my father's shooting a wild-goose feeding on the prairie at the measured distance of 140 yards. Though shot through the liver with a half-ounce ball, it rose and flew several hundred yards. In a healed wound were found several long slugs, which he recognized as Canadian in manufacture. On another occasion, seeing three wild-turkeys approaching him en echelon, he waited till he had them all in range, when he fired. A twenty-pound gobbler dropped, one flew off, and the third escaped, evidently wounded. An hour later Colonel Hall came over, and mentioned that a wounded wild-turkey had run into his blacksmithshop at full speed and dropped dead. It ran half a mile after being shot entirely through. General Johnston took pleasure in observing the habits
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Garfield, James Abram 1831-1881 (search)
Feb. 10, 1807; and on June 16, 1810, the act establishing Cuyahoga county went into operation. But that act all of Geauga west of the Ninth Range was made a part of Cuyahoga county. Ashtabula county was established on Jan. 22, 1811. A considerable number of Indians remained on the Western Reserve until the breaking out of the War of 1812. Most of the Canadian tribes took up arms against the United States in that struggle, and a portion of the Indians of the Western Reserve joined their Canadian brethren. At the close of that war occasional bands of these Indians returned to their old haunts on the Cuyahoga and the Mahoning; but the inhabitants of the Reserve soon made them understand that they were unwelcome visitors after the part they had taken against us. Thus the War of 1812 substantially cleared the Reserve of its Indian inhabitants. In this brief survey I have attempted to indicate the general character of the leading events connected with the discovery and settlement of
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
ery treaty......Aug. 23, 1888 Grover Cleveland's letter of acceptance......Sept. 8, 1888 Canadian retaliation bill passes House of Representatives by 176 to 4, Sept. 8; referred to the Senate cect property at Buffalo, N. Y.......Aug. 17, 1892 President Harrison, in retaliation against Canadian measures, proclaims that a toll of 20 cents per ton be collected from Sept. 1 until further notarmy arrested for trespassing on the grounds of the Capitol, and imprisoned......May 1, 1894 Canadian revenue-cutter Petrel seizes two American steamboats on Lake Erie, and arrests forty-eight residents of Ohio on charge of illegal fishing in Canadian waters......May 9, 1894 Richard Croker resigns as a member of the executive, and as chairman of the finance committee of Tammany Hall; John M......1898 Anglo-American League organized in London......July 13, 1898 United States and Canadian joint high commission meet in Quebec......Aug. 23, 1898 John Hay appointed Secretary of St
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—the Third winter. (search)
e, one of the posts established on the frontier. On the 20th it was camping on the borders of Devil's Lake. The Sioux, whose plans of campaign had just been thwarted by the death of their chief, Little Crow, killed by a white man, had suddenly retreated toward the Missouri at the approach of the troops. Sibley, discovering the tracks of this retreat, had started to pursue them, and by forced marches he had at last reached them July 24th on the centre of the high plateau called by the old Canadian hunters Missouri Hill. The savage warriors were numerous—more than two thousand, it is said; they belonged to the principal Sioux tribes. Not expecting the invasion of their territory whilst they were meditating that of Minnesota, they had established their camps near the frontier. Encumbered by the train they were dragging after them, they had not been able to cope in speed with the enemy, and had decided upon fighting, so that the long column of little horses which carried the women an
intimate and friendly relations. My heartfelt wish is, that these differences may be susceptible of satisfactory adjustment. The interest which I take in the well-being of the people of the United States cannot but be increased by the kind and cordial reception given by them to the Prince of Wales during his recent visit to the continent of America. I am glad to take the opportunity of expressing my warm appreciation of the loyalty and attachment to my person and throne manifested by my Canadian and other North American subjects on the occasion of the residence of the Prince of Wales among them. Napoleon, in his opening address, announces that the Government has thought proper, by diminishing the duties, to "renounce" 90,000,000 francs of its revenues. Of " foreign relations," he says: I have endeavored to prove, in my relations with foreign powers, that France sincerely desires peace, and that, without renouncing a legitimate influence, she does not pretend to interfe
The United Kingdom at Portland, &c. Portland,April 6. --The steamer United Kingdom, from Glasgow on the 23d ult., arrived here yesterday afternoon. News anticipated. The steamer John Bell, having discharged her Canadian cargo, sailed at 6 o'clock this morning for New York.
ression: But now allow me also to say that I am for peace — speedy and honorable peace — because I am for the Union, and know, or think I know, that every hour of warfare but so much diminishes the hopes and chances of its restoration. I repeat with Douglas. "War is disunion. War is final, eternal separation;" and with Chatham: "My Lords, you cannot conquer America." British neutrality. A New York war journal thus indulges in a brief comment upon the course of a prominent Canadian paper: The Toronto Leader, which appears to be in the secret service of Jeff. Davis, being strong in its support of the Southern rebellion, says that the American Government has spies in Toronto and other Canadian cities, whose business it is "to hover about the hotels and other public places, and to telegraph to the Federal agents in the States the names and the descriptions of Southern sympathizers who travel in that direction." After the Leader throws off this announcement, it goes
ources of the British American Provinces and possessions, together with other questions, including the right of the United States to a joint reciprocity, and the fiscal reasons for an American or continental system. It appears that the value of Canadian productions has increased twenty per cent by the treaty. While the United States tax Canadian productions only $25,000 per annum, Canada taxes our productions $1,000,000, and also has an unfair system of discrimination against the United StatesCanadian productions only $25,000 per annum, Canada taxes our productions $1,000,000, and also has an unfair system of discrimination against the United States. The report was recommitted for the further action of the committee. Federal movements in Missouri. St. Louis February 4. --Advices from the West state that the Seventh regiment, Col. Stevenson, left Lamine for Lexington on Monday, and will hold that post during the winter. They cannot reach that place too soon; Information has been received that the day after that place was evacuated by the Kansas First regiment the rebels cut down the American flag. On the Sunday following the
lace in the interior, care having been taken by the Confederate as well as by the State Governments that no cotton should be stored at any post within five miles of railroad stations or navigable streams. That portion of the crop which had been brought to various interior depots has long since been taken back to the plantations. Cotton will be delivered to any holders of bonds, if demanded, as provided in the fourth article of the contract. The London Morning Post, in an editorial on Canadian defences, says we have confident belief that the bluster of the Federal Government will produce very salutary effects in Canada. In spite of the urgent appeals of the Colonial Office, the Legislature of Canada has refused to place the milia on an efficient footing. As the Canadians have no sympathy with the North, the present prospect of affairs on their continent may induce them to show a little of the spirit which animated their fathers in 1812. Prudence as well as self- interest, shou
steamers. --The following is a complete list of the steamers lost between America and Europe, since the Ocean Steam Navigation Company was formed. They are put down in the order of the time of the disasters: President, Columbia, Humboldt, City of Glasgow, City of Philadelphia, Franklin, Arctic, Pacific, Lyonnals, Tempest, Austria, Canadian, No. 1, New York, Indian, Argo, Hungarian, Connaught, United States, Canadian, No. 2, North Britain, Caledonia, Anglo Saxon, Norwegian, Bohemian. steamers. --The following is a complete list of the steamers lost between America and Europe, since the Ocean Steam Navigation Company was formed. They are put down in the order of the time of the disasters: President, Columbia, Humboldt, City of Glasgow, City of Philadelphia, Franklin, Arctic, Pacific, Lyonnals, Tempest, Austria, Canadian, No. 1, New York, Indian, Argo, Hungarian, Connaught, United States, Canadian, No. 2, North Britain, Caledonia, Anglo Saxon, Norwegian, Bohemian.
1 2