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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 22 22 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army 6 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 6 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 3 1 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Port Isabel (Texas, United States) or search for Port Isabel (Texas, United States) in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Polk, James Knox 1795-1849 (search)
ops to occupy the left bank of the Del Norte. This river, which is the southwestern boundary of the State of Texas, is an exposed frontier. From this quarter invasions were threatened; upon it and in its immediate vicinity, in the judgment of high military experience, are the proper stations for the protecting forces of the government. In addition to this important consideration, several others occurred to induce this movement. Among these are the facilities afforded by the ports at Brazos Santiago and the mouth of the Del Norte for the reception of supplies by seas, the stronger and more healthful military positions, the convenience for obtaining a ready and a more abundant supply of provisions, water, fuel, and forage, and the advantages which are afforded by the Del Norte in forwarding supplies to such posts as may be established in the interior and upon the Indian frontier. The movement of the troops to the Del Norte was made by the commanding general under positive instr
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), State of Texas, (search)
andria and Shreveport was again begun. When, in obedience to orders, he began falling back, he was suddenly and furiously struck by Confederates under Gen. Richard Taylor, and a regiment (23d Wisconsin) on which the blow fell was reduced from 226 men to ninety-eight, most of them made prisoners. Meanwhile about 6,000 National troops, under General Dana, with some war-vessels, had sailed for the Rio Grande. Banks, in person, accompanied the expedition. The troops debarked (Nov. 2) at Brazos Santiago, drove a small Confederate cavalry force stationed there, and followed them to Brownsville, opposite Matamoras, which Banks entered on Nov. 6. At the close of the year the National troops occupied all the strong positions on the Texan coast excepting Galveston Island and a formidable work at the mouth of the Brazos River, and the Confederates had abandoned all Texas west of the Colorado River. Notwithstanding the downfall of the civil and military power of the Confederacy east of th