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Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 32 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 26 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 21 11 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 20 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 16 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 16 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Sabine Pass (Texas, United States) or search for Sabine Pass (Texas, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 5 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 31: operations of Farragut's vessels on the coast of Texas, etc. (search)
st of Texas. gallant attack on Corpus Christi by Volunteer-Lieutenant Kittredge. Galveston, Sabine Pass and Corpus Christi fall into the Federal hands. an expedition of the Army and Navy defeated at Sabine Pass. Farragut blockades Red River in the Hartford. capture of the Diana by the Confederates. loss of the union gun-boat Barrataria. destruction of the Queen-of-the-west by Lieutenant-Cous, sounds, and island groups which extends from the mouth of the Mississippi as far west as Sabine Pass, and the difficult bars and channels leading to Galveston, Matagorda and Corpus Christi, wherKittredge was surprised and with his boat's crew captured while reconnoitering. Galveston, Sabine Pass and Corpus Christi fell into the Federal hands a short time afterwards; the former place beinte his appointment by a signal victory over the enemy, proposed a combined expedition against Sabine Pass, which had been retaken and fortified by the enemy. The defences on shore, it was supposed,
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 38: review of the work done by the Navy in the year 1863. (search)
obtain supplies from that quarter. Farragut was engaged a part of the season with his ships below Port Hudson in bombarding that place. In these operations the Mortar vessels bore a conspicuous part, until Port Hudson fell, with Vicksburg, on the 4th of July, 1863, and the Mississippi was once more opened to the sea. The blockade of the Southern coast,within the limits of Admiral Farragut's command, had, in the main, been efficient and successful, although reverses at Galveston and Sabine Pass gave the enemy something on which to congratulate themselves. These reverses, however, of the Union arms were of no permanent advantage to the Confederates, as the whole coast, from the mouth of the Mississippi to that of the Rio Grande, was so closely guarded by the Union Navy that blockade-running was reduced to very insignificant proportions. The Mississippi squadron, under Rear-Admiral Porter, had been actively engaged in the work of suppressing the Rebellion, and co-operated zeal
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
Texas to hold permanently. With the aid of gun-boats 40,000 men could have been landed near Sabine Pass, and all that was worth anything in Texas would have been at the disposal of Federal forces. the Administration. General Banks himself seems originally to have favored an expedition to Sabine Pass, having some notion of the difficulties that would beset an expedition into Texas by any otheng likely to confuse Banks and compel him to alter his plans as often as Halleck did. Why the Sabine Pass expedition failed does not appear; but most of Banks' expeditions failed, and there is littany one. If Banks simply wanted to hold a strong point in Texas, he had the opportunity at Sabine Pass, which was the nearest point to his base of operations, and into which place he could from tivering the approaches to Galveston and Houston from the south, the defences of Galveston Bay, Sabine Pass, and Sabine River; Fort De Russy, a formidable work, located three miles from Marksville, for
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 49: first attack on Fort Fisher.--destruction of the confederate ram Albemarle, etc. (search)
etc. Comment on the above is unnecessary; yet, in the face of this condition of affairs and with the certain victory that could have been gained, General Weitzel recommended a retreat to Hampton Roads! Tile officer who was to have gone in command advised the one who had usurped it, that he had better abandon the field on the eve of victory and let the Navy manage the affair as best they could. General Weitzel's course at Fort Fisher was quite in keeping with his previous record at Sabine Pass, where, with a force greatly outnumbering the enemy, he ignominiously retired, leaving two frail gunboats to attack the Confederate works and be cut to pieces; at Baton Rouge, where he was only saved from defeat and capture by a gun-boat; and at Forts Jackson and St. Philip, which works he also reported as substantially uninjured by the Federal bombardment. It is possible, if General Weitzel had been in independent command with the entire responsibility resting on his shoulders, he might
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 53: operations of the West Gulf Squadron in the latter part of 1864, and in 1865.--joint operations in Mobile Bay by Rear-Admiral Thatcher and General Canby. (search)
e owned by the Confederacy. The following officers of the Webb gave themselves up, after having been pursued to the swamps by the Navy: Lieutenant Read, her late commanding officer; Lieutenant Wm. H. Wall, Master S. P. LeBlanc, Passed-Midshipman H. H. Scott, Assistant Surgeon W. J. Addison, and Pilot James West. It was not until the 25th of May that the Confederates began to evacuate their fortified places in Texas and return to their homes. The first place evacuated was the works at Sabine Pass, which had been a point both parties had contended for throughout the war. About May 27th, the Confederate Army in Texas generally disbanded, taking advantage of the terms of surrender entered into and executed at New Orleans between the Confederate Commissioners and General Canby, of the U. S. Army, where all the Confederate fortifications and property was given up. No Confederate naval force was left in Texas except the remains of the ram Missouri, which was surrendered to the com