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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York, (search)
vernor Nicolls leaves New York......Aug. 17, 1668 Col. Francis Lovelace governor......Aug. 28, 1668 Staten Island adjudged to New York......1668 Twenty whales captured in New York Harbor during spring of......1669 Name Kingston given to Esopus......Sept. 25, 1669 La Salle, Dollier, and Galinee explore lakes Ontario and Erie; possession taken for France......1669 Staten Island purchased from the Indians......April 13, 1670 Katherine Harrison, widow, banished from Weathersfield, Conn., for witchcraft, comes to Westchester. Citizens complain, but the court of assizes directs her release. She is obliged to leave......August, 1670 George Fox, the Quaker, visits Long Island......1672 Monthly post between New York and Boston; first post messenger......Jan. 22, 1673 Dutch fleet of seven vessels, with 1,600 men, arrives off Sandy Hook. The Dutch of New York welcome their countrymen......Aug. 7, 1673 Dutch fire on Fort James, which returns a shot. Fort Jame
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Webb, Samuel Blatchley 1753- (search)
Webb, Samuel Blatchley 1753- Military officer; born at Weathersfield, Conn., Dec. 15, 1753; father of the preceding and step-son of Silas Deane; was thanked for his gallantry in the battle of Bunker (Breed's) Hill, where he was wounded, and in June, 1776, was appointed aide-decamp to Washington. In the battle of White Plains he was again wounded; also at Trenton. He was in the battle of Brandywine, and in 1778 raised and took command of the 3d Connecticut Regiment. In 1779 he, with most of his men, were captured by the British fleet while crossing to Long Island with General Parsons, and was not released until 1780, when he took command of the light infantry, with the brevet rank of brigadier-general. He lived in New York City after the war, until 1789, when he removed to Claverack, N. Y., where he died, Dec. 3, 1807.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Witchcraft, New York (search)
Witchcraft, New York In 1665 Ralph Hill and his wife Mary were arrested for witchcraft and sorcery; they were tried by a jury, which included Jacob Leisler, afterwards governor, and acquitted, the jury finding nothing considerable against them. The event created but little excitement. In 1670, however, the case of Katherine Harrison led to complications between the judiciary and the people. She was a widow, who on being banished from Weathersfield, Conn., as a witch, settled in Westchester. As soon as her antecedents became known, a formal complaint was lodged against her, and she was taken before the court of assizes for examination. There nothing could be proven against her, and she was, accordingly, released from restraint. Her neighbors, however, were not satisfied with the decision of the court, and took such means of showing their resentment that she was compelled to seek a home elsewhere. This was probably the earliest case in the colonies of what is now known as
. The enterprise which forms the subject of this monograph is sound to the core, and the city of Cambridge may well reckon the Boston Woven Hose and Rubber Co. among the best samples of prosperity in its memorial year. John P. Squire & Co. The history of the firm of John P. Squire & Co. Corporation, one of the large manufacturing interests in the city of Cambridge, is practically the story of the life and struggles of its founder, Mr. John P. Squire. Mr. Squire was born in Weathersfield, Vt., May 8, 1819, and was the son of Peter and Esther (Craigue) Squire. He spent his boyhood days on his father's farm, working during the vacations and attending the public schools in term time. This early experience on a New England farm was no hindrance to him in his later experience in business life. His first introduction to business was in his sixteenth year, when he entered the store of Mr. Gad Orvis, in the village of West Windsor, Vt. He remained with Mr. Orvis until the winter
Chapter 6: civil History. Contemplated removal to Weathersfield, Conn. Letter from Winthrop to Hooker. Letter from Hooker to Shepard. depreciation in the value of property. danger of general bankruptcy. reasons for removing. Sir Henry Vane. grant of Shawshine to Cambridge. removal of John Haynes. death of Roger Harlakenden. arrival of Herbert Pelham. Town Spring. Restrictions on the cutting of trees. Field-drivers, Commissioners to end small causes, Clerk of the Market, and Sealer of Leather, first elected. Calves impounded. eight-penny ordinary for Townsmen. penalty for absence from monthly meetings. prosecution for trespass in the great Swamp. fence-viewers first elected. Remission of tax on account of sickness. chimneys to be swept every month and ladders to be kept ready for reaching the roofs of houses. Orchard. Wharf. division of Shawshine lands. incorporation of Billerica Notwithstanding Mr. Shepard and his associates here found sufficient for
of which colony he was Treasurer in 1637, and was an Elder of the church in Weathersfield. Chauncy, Rev. Charles, s. of George Chauncy of Hertfordshire, England, . Thomas Hooker, and was probably the widow Dorothy Chester, who settled at Weathersfield, Conn., and whose son, Leonard Chester, is said by Hinman to have been the o have died when young, under forty years of age, in 1648. His children at Weathersfield were John, b. 3 Aug. 1635; Dorcas, b. Nov. 1637; Stephen, b. Mar. 3 1639; M Champney, admitted into f. c., Thomas Hubbard, now joined to the church of Weathersfield. He d. 28 Aug. 1693, a. 62; his w. Hannah d. previously, and the inscripticitizen. He was father of John, who grad. H. C. 1645, and was Minister at Weathersfield and Hadley, the trusty protector of the Regicide Judges. 2. William, by ster, driven thence at the destruction of that town, and finally rem. to Weathersfield, Conn., where he d. 1683, leaving w. Mary and chil. Job, John, Mary, and Jemim
s afterwards sold to Samuel Shepard. He removed, probably in 1636, to Connecticut, of which colony he was Treasurer in 1637, and was an Elder of the church in Weathersfield. Chauncy, Rev. Charles, s. of George Chauncy of Hertfordshire, England, bap. at Yardley 5 Nov. 1592, came to New England 1638, and after preaching at Plymoueft no posterity. Chester, Mrs., owned land in Camb. 1635. She was sister of Rev. Thomas Hooker, and was probably the widow Dorothy Chester, who settled at Weathersfield, Conn., and whose son, Leonard Chester, is said by Hinman to have been the father and ancestor of the Chester family; and to have died when young, under forty years of age, in 1648. His children at Weathersfield were John, b. 3 Aug. 1635; Dorcas, b. Nov. 1637; Stephen, b. Mar. 3 1639; Mary, b. Jan. 1641; Prudence, b. Feb. 1643; Eunice, b. Jan. 1645; Mercy, b. Feb. 1647. Hinman. Of these children, Dorcas m. Rev. Samuel Whiting of Billerica 12 Nov. 1656; Prudence m. Mr. Thomas Russell of
e d. in childbed 20 Oct. 1665, and he m. Hannah, dau. of Miles Ives of Watertown, 8 Jan. 1667-8. His children were Sarah, b. 17 June 1662, m. Nicholas Bowes 26 June 1684, and d. 26 Jan. 1688-9; Mary, b. 20 Oct. 1665, m. Jason Russell 27 May 1684. James the f. was prob. son of wid. Elizabeth Hubbard, who m. William Hamlet, and whose children, as named by Mitchell (Ch. Rec.) were James Hubbard, Sarah Hubbard, now Champney, admitted into f. c., Thomas Hubbard, now joined to the church of Weathersfield. He d. 28 Aug. 1693, a. 62; his w. Hannah d. previously, and the inscription on her tombstone bears testimony to her faithful performance of the difficult duties of a step-mother. Here lies buried Hannah Hubert, the loving wife of James Hubert, a tender and loving mother to his children; careful of their souls and bodies, loving and faithful, diligent and prudent; who departed this life in sweet peace the 24th day of November 1690, aged about 48. Martha, m. Noah Champney 16 Oct. 172
ha, b. 10 Sept. 1708, d.—Ap. 1713; Millicent, b. 11 Nov. 1710, d. 19 Nov. 1712; Martha, b. 10 Nov. 1713. Thomas the f. resided at the Farms. Russell, John, was here as early as 5 Oct. 1635, and resided at the N. W. corner of Holyoke and Mount Auburn streets, in a house purchased of Daniel Abbott. He was Surveyor of Arms 1638, Selectman 1642 and 1643, Constable in 1648, Clerk of the Writs 1645, and an active citizen. He was father of John, who grad. H. C. 1645, and was Minister at Weathersfield and Hadley, the trusty protector of the Regicide Judges. 2. William, by w. Martha, had Joseph, b. in England about 1636 (55 years old in 1691, Depo.), and after his arrival here, Benjamin; John, b. 11 Sept. 1645; Martha; Philip, b. about 1650; William, b. 28 Ap. 1655; Jason, b. 14 Nov. 1658; Joyce, b. 31 Mar. 1660, m. Edmund Rice of Sudbury before 1681. It is not known that this family was connected with that of John (1), or that of Richard of Chs. William the f. was a carpenter, and
to Hadley, where he d. 9 Ap. 1669. He left no son, and only one daughter Sarah, who m. Aaron Cook, an emigrant from Dorchester, and had a son, Westwood Cook. Rev. Samuel Cook of Menot. was a descendant. Whaley, George, by w. Katherine, had Thomas, b. 14 Nov. 1650; George, b. 19 Ap. 1653. Whitcomb, Job (otherwise written Whetcomb), by w. Mary, had Jemima, b. 30 Mar. 1678. He was prob. s. of John of Lancaster, driven thence at the destruction of that town, and finally rem. to Weathersfield, Conn., where he d. 1683, leaving w. Mary and chil. Job, John, Mary, and Jemima. White, John, one of the first company, res. on the northerly side of Bow Street; he sold his estate 20 Oct. 1635 to Nicholas Danforth. He was a member of the first Board of Selectmen or Townsmen 1634-5, and rem. with Hooker to Hartford, where he held sundry offices. He was one of sixty persons in 1659 who signed an agreement to remove to Massachusetts for the settlement of Hadley. He removed, and d. there
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