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General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 5 (search)
rigadier-General D. R. Jones in consequence of the illness of the major-general, passed the night of the 5th at Diascund Bridge; that of Major-General Smith at Barhamsville, twelve miles from New Kent Court-House; those of Longstreet and D. H. Hill, with the cavalry, at Williamsburg, as has been said. In Federal dispatches of tates troops had landed at Eltham's, and nearly opposite to West Point, on the southern shore of York River. Early next morning the army was concentrated near Barhamsville. In the mean time General Smith had ascertained that the enemy was occupying a thick wood between the New Kent road and Etham's Landing. The security of our t Court-House, and Longstreet's and Hill's that by the Long Bridges. In these marches the right column reached the Baltimore Cross-roads, nineteen miles from Barhamsville, and the left the Long Bridges. The army remained five days in this position, in line facing to the east, Longstreet's right covering the Long Bridges, and Ma
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 14 (search)
he subject, Colonel R. G. Cole stated: To sum up, then, the amount of loss sustained by the department, from the withdrawal from Yorktown by the army, I regard as so inconsiderable in comparison with the number of troops as to justify me in stating that it was nothing. We refused no gage of battle, but were ready to repel the enemy's attack each day of the sixteen during which we confronted him near Yorktown; and fought him successfully at Williamsburg, and drove him out of our way at Barhamsville. As to disparity of numbers, it was a hundred and thirty-three thousand Report of Adjutant-General of the United States Army to committee on conduct of the war. to fifty thousand; far greater than existed when General Lee took command of that army on the first of June, or than that against us in Mississippi in December, 1862, or in Middle Tennessee in 1863. Yet General Lee was justly sustained by the Administration and people for postponing his attack upon McClellan four weeks, that
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Letters. (search)
ith the number of troops as to justify me in stating that the loss was nothing. (Signed) R. G. Cole. Headquarters, Barhamsville, May 7, 1862. General: The enemy has a large fleet of gunboats (seven iron-clads) and transports at West Point. Hef those of the enemy, were placed in hospitals and residences in Williamsburg. Major-General Smith's division reached Barhamsville, eighteen miles; and Major-General Magruder's (commanded by Brigadier-General D. R. Jones) the Diascund Bridge on the ng in force on the south side of York River, near West Point. On the following morning the army was concentrated near Barhamsville. In the mean time it had been ascertained that the enemy occupied a thick and extensive wood between Barhamsville andBarhamsville and their landing-place. Brigadier-General Whiting was directed by General Smith to dislodge him, which was handsomely done-the brigade of Hood, and part of that of Hampton, performed the service. You are respectfully referred, for details, to the acc