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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Kelleysville, March 17th, 1863-Reports of Generals J. E. B. Stuart and Fitz. Lee. (search)
y, mounted and dismounted, for an hour and a half-killing and wounding 30 or 40 of them. I also ordered the remaining sharpshooters of the brigade, under that very efficient officer Major Morgan, First Virginia, to move from their camps by day-break to a point on the railroad, where road turns to Kelley's, 2 mile from railroad bridge, and 31 from Kelley's, and the rest of the command was ordered to be in readiness to move at the shortest notice. At that time a force was reported to be at Bealeton, supposed to be their advance guard; and it was uncertain whether they would attempt to cross at Kelley's, railroad bridge, or move on towards Warrenton. The report that enemy's attack was made at Kelley's never reached me; and the first intimation I received from that point was at 7:30 A. M., to the effect that they had succeeded in crossing, capturing 25 of my sharpshooters who were unable to reach their horses. I moved my command at once down the railroad, taking up a position to aw
Doc. 10.-fight at Beverly's Ford, Va. National accounts. in bivouac at Bealeton, Va., Orange and Alexandria Railroad, Tuesday Evening, June 9, 1863. this has truly been an exciting day. An hour since I sent you the mere skeleton of the day's operations, which scarcely affords any idea of the extent or character of our achievements. I informed you by letter on Monday what might be expected to-day, and I have now the result to record. About the middle of last week, information oward toward Culpeper on roads converging at Brandy Station, where a junction of the forces was to be formed, or sooner if necessary. On Monday evening, therefore, Gen. Buford's column left Warrenton Junction, and followed by General Ames from Bealeton, bivouacked for the night near the Bowen mansion, about one mile from Beverly's Ford. General Gregg, taking his own and Colonel Dufie's command, moved to the left from the Junction, and encamped for the night in close proximity to Kelly's Ford,
hour and a half, killing and wounding thirty or forty of them. I also ordered the remaining sharpshooters of the brigade under that very efficient officer, Major Morgan, First Virginia, to move from their camps by daybreak, to a point on the railroad, where the road turns to Kelley's, half a mile from the railroad bridge, and three and a half from Kelley's; and the rest of the command was ordered to be in readiness to move at the shortest notice. At that time a force was reported to be at Bealeton, supposed to be their advance guard, and it was uncertain whether they would attempt to cross at Kelley's, the railroad bridge, or move on towards Warrenton. The report that the enemy's attack was made at Kelley's never reached me; and the first intimation I received from that point was at half past 7 A. M., to the effect that they had succeeded in crossing, capturing twenty-five of my sharpshooters, who were unable to reach their horses. I moved my command at once down the railroad, ta
Telegram this moment received. I have sent orders to Franklin to prepare to march with his corps at once, and to repair here in person to inform me as to his means of transportation. Kearny was yesterday at Rappahannock Station; Porter at Bealeton, Kellip, Barnell's, etc. Sumner will commence reaching Falmouth to-day. Williams's Mass. Cavalry will be mostly at Falmouth to-day. I loaned Burnside my personal escort (one squadron 4th regulars), to scout down Rappahannock. I have sent airs? What troops in your front, right, and left? Sumner is now landing at Acquia. Where is Pope's left, and what of enemy? Enemy burned Bull Run bridge last night with cavalry force. Maj.-Gen. Heintzelman, Warrenton. Maj.-Gen. Porter, Bealeton. P. S. If these general officers are not at the places named, nearest operator will please have message forwarded. I also telegraphed to the general-in-chief the following despatches: Aug. 27, 10.50 A. M. I have sent all the i
her head. Gathering a staff of keen-witted men, chiefly from the ranks, Sharpe never let his commanding general suffer for lack of proper information as to the strength and movements of Lee's army. The Confederate advance into Pennsylvania, in June, taxed the resources of the bureau greatly. Scouts and special agents, as well as signal-men, were kept in incessant action, locating and following the various detachments of the invading force. It was a difficult matter to estimate, from the numerous reports and accounts received daily, just what Lee was trying to do. The return to Virginia brought some relief to the secret-service men. In August, while Lee hastened back to the old line of the Rapidan, Colonel Sharpe lay at Bealeton, and here the army photographer took his picture, as above, on the extreme left. Next to him sits John C. Babcock; the right-hand figure is that of John McEntee, detailed from the 80th New York Infantry. These men were little known, but immensely useful.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Logan, John Alexander 1826-1886 (search)
and clear the country between that place and Gainesville, where McDowell is. If Morell has not joined you, send word to him to push forward immediately; also send word to Banks to hurry forward with all speed to take your place at Warrenton Junction. It is necessary, on all accounts, that you should be here by daylight. I send an officer with this despatch who will conduct you to this place. Be sure to send word to Banks, who is on the road from Fayetteville, probably in the direction of Bealeton. Say to Banks, also, that he had best run back the railroad trains to this side of Cedar Run. If he is not with you, write him to that effect. By command of Major-General Pope. George D. Ruggles, Colonel and Chief of Staff. Maj.-Gen. F.-J. Porter, Warrenton Junction. P. S.—If Banks is not at Warrenton Junction, leave a regiment of infantry and two pieces of artillery as a guard till he comes up, with instructions to follow you immediately. If Banks is not at the Junction, inst
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Virginia, 1863 (search)
H. B. Cavalry. MASSACHUSETTS--2d Cavalry (Detachment). Oct. 22: Skirmish near BealetonMAINE--1st Cavalry. PENNSYLVANIA--2d Cavalry. Oct. 22: Skirmish, Rappahannock Oct. 23: Skirmish, FayettevillePENNSYLVANIA--2d Cavalry. Oct. 24: Skirmish, BealetonDISTRICT OF COLUMBIA--1st Cavalry. Oct. 24: Skirmish, Liberty(No Reports.) Oct. 25-26: Skirmishes at and near BealetonINDIANA--3d Cavalry. Oct. 26: Affair, New BaltimoreAttack by Mosby on Wagon Train. Oct. 27: Skirmish, BealetonILLINOIS--8thBealetonILLINOIS--8th Cavalry. Oct. 27: Skirmish, Rappahannock StationILLINOIS--12th Cavalry. Oct. 30: Skirmish near Catlett's StationILLINOIS--8th Cavalry. Oct. 31: Affair near Weavern train. Union loss, 1 wounded, 1 missing. Total, 2. Nov. 21: Expedition from Bealeton toward Thoroughfare GapDetachment 2d Cavalry Division. Nov. 24: Skirmish nearnter's MillsPicket attack. Union loss, 4 wounded. Dec. 21-23: Expedition from Bealeton to LurayMAINE--1st Cavalry. PENNSYLVANIA--2d, 8th and 16th Cavalry. Dec. 22:
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Virginia, 1864 (search)
: Skirmish, WarrentonPENNSYLVANIA--3d Cavalry (Detachment). Union loss, 1 killed, 8 wounded, 30 missing. Total, 39. Jan. 10: Skirmish, Loudon HeightsMARYLAND--1st P. H. B. Cavalry. Union loss, 9 killed, 20 wounded, 41 missing. Total, 70. Jan. 10: Scout to Sperryville(No Reports.) Jan. 12: Affair, AccotinkDetachment Provost Guard. Jan. 12: Affair, Ellis FordPickets. Jan. 12-14: Raid on Northern Neck(No Reports.) Jan. 13: Affair, Ely's FordPENNSYLVANIA--18th Cavalry. Jan. 14: Skirmish, BealetonMASSACHUSETTS--9th Infantry (1 Co.). Union loss, 2 wounded. Jan. 16: Affair, Turkey Creek(No Reports.) Jan. 17: Skirmish near Ellis and Ely's FordsMASSACHUSETTS--2d Cavalry (Detachment). Jan. 18: Affair, Flint HillPicket attack. Jan. 19: Skirmish, StevensburgNEW YORK--2d Cavalry. Jan. 19-24: Scouts from WilliamsburgNEW YORK--7th Cavalry (1st M. R.). Jan. 22: Skirmish, Germantown(No Reports.) Jan. 22: Affair, Ellis FordMASSACHUSETTS--2d Cavalry. Jan. 22-24: Scout to MiddleburgPENNSYLV
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Connecticut Volunteers. (search)
cellorsville May 1-5. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign June 11-July 24. Battle of Gettysburg July 1-3. Funkstown, Md., July 12. Snicker's Gap, Va., July 21. Near Raccoon Ford, Va., till September 24. March to Brandy Station, thence to Bealeton and movement to Stevenson, Ala., September 24-October 3. Guard duty along Nashville and Chattanooga R. R. at Cowan and Cumberland Tunnel till April, 1864. Atlanta Campaign May to September. Demonstration on Rocky Faced Ridge May 8-11. 27. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Battle of Chancellorsville May 1-5. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign June 11-July 24. Battle of Gettysburg July 1-3. Near Raccoon Ford till September 24. Moved to Brandy Station, thence to Bealeton and to Stevenson, Ala., September 24-October 3. Guard duty along Nashville & Chattanooga R. R. till April, 1864. Action at Tracy City, Tenn., January 20, 1864 (Co. B ). Atlanta Ga. Campaign May to September. Demonstration on Rocky
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, District of Columbia Volunteers. (search)
and ordered to report at Norfolk, Va.) 1st Brigade, Kautz's Cavalry Division, Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to June, 1864. 2nd Brigade, Kautz's Cavalry Division, Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to January, 1865. 2nd Brigade, Cavalry Division, Dept. of Virginia, to August, 1865. Cavalry, Dept. of Virginia, to October, 1865. Service. Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D. C., till January, 1864. Skirmish near Annandale, Va., October 22, 1863 (Detachment). Bealeton, Va., October 24. Ordered to Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, and on duty at Yorktown, and a portion of the Regiment at Portsmouth, Va., dismounted, till May, 1864. Kautz's Raid on Petersburg & Weldon R. R. May 5-11, 1864. Double Bridges May 5. Stony Creek Station May 7. White's Bridge, Nottaway Creek and Nottaway R. R. Bridge May 8. White's Bridge May 9, Kautz's Raid on Richmond & Danville R. R. May 12-17. Belcher's Mills May 16. Petersburg June 9. Assaults on
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