Your search returned 167 results in 74 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
e of Captain Phelps, of Floyd's brigade; were captured in Kanawha, Roane, Wyoming, Fayette, and Raleigh counties. Most were taken on election day, together with poll-books, which are also in charge of Capt. Phelps. The names of many of them are entered in these books, which will be evidence against them. A couple of men, one named Robert DeShelta, and the other John Cannon, were before the Mayor yesterday on charge of robbing and stealing. They represented themselves as having belonged to the Tiger Rifles, Wheat's battalion, and one of them stated that they had both been drummed out of camp, and dishonorably discharged. In default of security, they were committed to jail. The cars from the West brings no news of interest this morning. None of the troops had reached Bristol yesterday evening, the detention being occasioned by the accident. The traitors are reported to be gathering in large number at Elizabethtown, and threatened to burn the Watauga bridge. O. K.
The Daily Dispatch: November 19, 1861., [Electronic resource], The late Incendiary outrages in Tennessee. (search)
As I see in your paper of the 12th inst., in an article headed "Lincolnites in Tennessee." several mistakes, I will so far trespass on your time as to set you right in regard to them. 1st. There are but bridges burnt on the road between Bristol and Knoxville, instead of five; but an attempt was made to burn a third, near Strawberry plains, but the sentinel shot and killed two, and, with more than Spartan value, fought the whole band of incendiaries until he was literally cut down and lree and a half miles above the bridge, on the premises of the traitor, "Nat. Taylor." These outing party on Sunday night was led by that gallant and Capt. H. B. Miller, Company "G. Regiment Mississippi Volunteers, who, to be detailed in Bristol, volunteered, at the head of a number of our citizens, to repel the threatened attack, on the bridge.-- The Captain having been directed by General Clarke, who was temporarily command, to find out the strength and position of the enemy, was cros
From the Kentucky line. was received last night from Wise country that the enemy, under Nelson, had through the Pound Gap, on col Williams to to be ten thousand, On Friday Williams was four of this since of the Gap, the enemy on the other . We have no further intelligences but the foregoing is sufficient to de the pressing importance of active serious to present disaster. The Government here have offered up several regiments to and Bristol.
ppears to have been a preconcerted plan with the Tories of this end of the State, as all the bridges were destroyed on the same night, and, as some of the incendiaries who were captured the same night declared, that every railroad bridge between Bristol and Chattanooga were in ashes by that time. It certainly was planned with great secrecy and caution; for, considering the numbers engaged in the conspiracy, and the desperate work in which they were engaged, it seems strange that the plot was nt he did not consider the oath binding on his conscience. They can do such things with impunity in Tennessee. Such is the result of political toleration. The Tories are in force at Elizabethton, Carter county, about twenty-five miles from Bristol, to protect the bridge burners. Their number is seven or eight hundred. They sent in a flag of truce day before yesterday to the Commander at Carter's Depot, with a communication to the effect that they would pay for the bridge burnt at Huron
ple of the North are imposed upon: The National flag now floated over the soil of every seceded State except Alabama and Arkansas. In Virginia it floats over one-third of the State; in North Carolina, at Hatteras Inlet; in South Carolina, at Port Royal and a half-dozen neighboring islands; in Georgia, on Tybee Island; in Florida, at Key West, Santa Rosa Island, and other points; in Mississippi, at Ship Island; in Louisiana, at Chandelier Island; Texas, at El Paso; and in Tennessee, at Bristol, Elizabethtown, and other points in the eastern part of the State. "how are the Mighty fallen." Old Scott's life has been equal to Cardinal Woolsey's. The Baltimore American attests the fact in the following paragraph: Early on Sunday morning, about half a dozen ladies, with a number of children, with passes from General Scott, left Old Point wharf under a flag of truce, granted by Commodore Goldsborough, with the anticipation of proceeding South, but the commanding officer of
is held by every true Southron, and flattered and frowned upon, as he would be by the Yankees, there is no telling the pitch of phrenzy to which he would carry the already morbid fanaticism of the North. Should the Parson quit his hold on this world, his best friend here would say Amea to his exit. The 56th Virginia Regiment left Abingdon on Friday last, commanded by Capt; Thos. T. Boswell. The field officers were necessarily absent. The ladies everywhere on the road manifested their patriotism by waving their handkerchiefs. Even the negroes, one of whom was a little fellow about a foot high, took their caps off, and tossed them in the air as the regiment assed. At Bristol a negro was observed with a black flag flung to the breeze. This caused great cheering. Captain Boswell is working vigorously, and will soon have his command at Howling Green, where, when the fight taken place, the boys crave a plage in the picture "nearest to the firing of the guns." Occarichs.
$100 reward. --Ranaway from the subscriber my boy Henry, for whose apprehension and delivery to E. H. Stokes, of this place, or for his confinement in any jail, so that I get him again, I will pay the above reward. Henry is about 23 years old, black, about five feet three inches high, and has rather a down look when spoken to. Had on when he left black coat and pants, and black felt hat. He has been seen near Bristol, on the Manassas Gap Railroad, and near Cub Run Bridge. He may be lurking around Dunfries of Richmond. T. D. Carter, ja 23--1m* for Dr. England.
$100 reward --Ranaway from the subscriber my boy Henry, for whose apprehension and delivery to R. H. Stokes, of this place, or for his confinement in any jail, so that I get him again, I will pay the above reward. Henry is about 23 years old, black, about five feet three inches high, and has rather a down look when spoken to. Had on when he left black coat and pants, and black felt hat. He has been seen near Bristol, on the Mansess Gap Railroad, and near Cub Run Bridge. He may be lurking around Dumfries or Richmond. T. D. Carter, ja 23--1m* for Dr. England.
$100 reward. --Ranaway from the subscriber my boy Henry, for whose apprehension and delivery to E. H. Stokes, of this place, or for his confinement in any jail, so that I get him again, I will pay the above reward. Henry is about 23 years old, black, about five feet three inches high, and has rather a down look when spoken to. Had on when he left black coat and pants, and black felt hat. He has been seen near Bristol, on the Manassas Gap Railroad, and near Cub Run Bridge. He may be lurking around Dumfries or Richmond. T. D. Carter, ja 23--1m for Dr. England.
$100 reward. --Ranaway from the subscriber my boy Henry, for whose apprehension and delivery to E. H. Stokes, of this place, or for his confinement in any jail, so that I get him again, I will pay the above reward. Henry is about 23 years old, black, about five feet three inches high, and has rather a down look when spoken to. Had on when he left black coat and pants, and black felt hat. He has been seen near Bristol, on the Manassas Gap Railroad, and near Cub Run Bridge. He may be lurking around Dumfries or Richmond. T. D. Carter, ja 23--1m* for Dr. England.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8