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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 217 5 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 126 118 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 99 19 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 25 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 22 8 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 21 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 19 3 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 18 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Chantilly (Virginia, United States) or search for Chantilly (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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ely maintained by the enemy until dark, when he retreated, having lost two general officers, one of whom, Major-General Kearny, was left dead on the field. Longstreet's command arrived after the action was over, and the next morning it was found that the enemy had conducted his retreat so rapidly that the attempt to intercept him was abandoned. The proximity of the fortifications around Alexandria and Washington rendered further pursuit useless, and our army rested during the second near Chantilly, the enemy being followed only by the cavalry, who continued to harass him until he reached the shelter of his intrenchments. In the series of engagements on the plains of Manassas, more than seven thousand prisoners were taken, in addition to about two thousand wounded left in our hands. Thirty pieces of artillery, upward of twenty thousand stand of small-arms, numerous colors, and a large amount of stores, besides those taken by General Jackson at Manassas Junction, were captured. T
n the following day, the command marched for Chantilly, via the Little River turnpike. The enemy worted in position in our front as we reached Chantilly, and he made an attack upon General Jackson Hanover Junction, and joined General Lee at Chantilly, on the second September, three days after t in the command, was killed at Ox Hill, near Chantilly, on the first of September. There is the sa not attempt it. affair at Ox Hill, near Chantilly, and march into Maryland. On the afternoond moving in single column, until we reached Chantilly, where the division was placed in two columnSudley Ford, crossing at it, and marching to Chantilly the next day; whence, under orders from GeneGeneral Starke to hold the road leading from Chantilly to Centreville. Taking a position about twoof march, and, on the first of September, at Chantilly, we again met the enemy and repulsed them. guns of Rice's battery took position between Chantilly and Centreville, with the Second Virginia br