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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 6 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 6 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 4 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 2 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 2 0 Browse Search
Judith White McGuire, Diary of a southern refugee during the war, by a lady of Virginia 2 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 2 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. 2 0 Browse Search
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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The First cavalry. (search)
ly authorized to be raised for the war. At that time, there was a troop composed of some of the best young men of Germantown and vicinity, all mounted, armed, and fully equipped for active service, undergoing a thorough course of drill at Chestnut Hill, under the instructions of James H. Stevenson, who had just returned from California, after serving a term of enlistment as sergeant in the First United States Dragoons. William Rotch Wister, Esq., was captain of the troop, and, on hearing oause they lacked one man of the requisite number. The officers of the company were: Captain, William H. Boyd; First Lieutenant, William W. Hanson; and Second Lieutenant, James H. Stevenson (he who had been drilling Captain Wister's troops at Chestnut Hill). On the 22d of July, Boyd's company arrived at Washington, amid the excitement caused by the Union repulse at Bull run the previous day. That night they listened to horrifying tales of the sanguinary deeds performed by the Black Horse cavalr
upied as they are in the one I left. All hearts and hands seem open to our army. Four heavily laden wagons have left Berryville within a few days, for the hospitals below. We are all anxious about Western Virginia, of which we can hear so little. General Lee and General Floyd are there, and if they can only have men and ammunition enough we have nothing to fear. The army in Fairfax seems quiet. Colonel Stuart, with his cavalry, has driven the enemy back, and taken possession of Chestnut Hill as Headquarters. There they are overlooking Washington, Georgetown, and our neighbourhood, all bristling with cannon, to prevent their nearer approach. Some of those young men can almost point from the hills on which they are encamped, to chimneys of their own firesides, the portals of their own homes. The woods are cleared away for miles; even the yard trees are gone, leaving the houses in bold relief, with nothing to shade, nothing to obscure them. I do pity those who were obliged
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cow Chace, the (search)
ierce the dusky tribe moved on, Of heroes drunk as poison.The sounds confused of boasting oaths Re-echoed through the wood, Some vow'd to sleep in dead men's clothes, And some to swim in blood.At Irvine's nod, 'twas fine to see The left prepared to fight, The while the drovers, Wayne and Lee, Drew off upon the right.Which Irvine 'twas Fame don't relate, Nor can the Muse assist her, Whether 'twas he that cocks a hat, Or he that gives a glister.For greatly one was signalized That fought at Chestnut Hill, And Canada immortalized The vender of the pill.Yet the attendance upon Proctor They both might have to boast of, For there was business for the doctor, And hats to be disposed of.Let none uncandidly infer That Stirling wanted spunk; The self-made peer had sure been there, But that the peer was drunk.But turn we to the Hudson's banks, Where stood the modest train, With purpose firm, though slender ranks, Nor cared a pin for Wayne.For then the unrelenting hand Of rebel fury drove, And tor
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Germantown, battle of. (search)
Germantown. Washington had been reinforced by Maryland and New Jersey troops. His army moved in four columns during the night of Oct. 3, the divisions of Sullivan and Wayne, flanked by General Conway's brigade on the right, moving by way of Chestnut Hill, while Armstrong, with Pennsylvania militia, made a circuit to gain the left and rear of the enemy. The divisions of Greene and Stephen, flanked by McDougall's brigade (two-thirds of the whole army), moved on a circuitous route to attack thewas guarded by Hessian yagers (riflemen). Near the large stone mansion of Chief-Justice Chew (see illustration), at the head of the village, was a strong regiment under Colonel Musgrave. Washington's army, moving stealthily, tried to reach Chestnut Hill before the dawn (Oct. 4), but failed. It was near sunrise when they emerged from the woods on that eminence. The whole country was enveloped in a thick fog. The British were surprised. The troops of Wayne and Sullivan fell, unexpectedly an
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Irvine, James 1735-1819 (search)
Irvine, James 1735-1819 Military officer; born in Philadelphia, Pa., Aug. 4, 1735; took part in Colonel Bouquet's expedition as captain in a Pennsylvania regiment. During the Revolutionary War he was captain and later lieutenant-colonel of the 1st Pennsylvania; and was commissioned colonel of the 9th Pennsylvania Regiment, Oct. 25, 1776. He was taken prisoner during the action at Chestnut Hill, Dec. 5, 1777, carried to New York, and remained there till he was exchanged in 1781. After the close of the war he was a member of the General Assembly of Pennsylvania in 1785-86, and of the State Senate in 1795-99. He died in Philadelphia, Pa., April 28, 1819.
ody hurt on our side, not even a horse! But I suppose General Johnston will transmit to-day the official reports of the affair, which does so much credit to Colonel Stuart, of the cavalry. He and General Longstreet are two very promising officers. The latter will be ordered to-day to advance with his brigade to Falls Church, and General Ewell to Annandale, so as to be ready to support, at a moment's notice, the forces at and about Munson's and Mason's hills (the latter is called also Chestnut Hill). I transferred, yesterday, my headquarters to this place, so as to be nearer the scene of operations. I am under the impression, from all I can learn, that the enemy, whenever ready, will make a strong demonstration in our front, and then endeavor to turn this place, either by Dumfries, on the lower Potomac, or by Leesburg, on the upper Potomac; in either case we ought to be prepared to strike him from Camp Pickens as a centre, for which purpose we must have collected at that point a
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Harriet Beecher Stowe. (search)
stible fund of entertaining information made her room a favorite resort of the children. From her hands Harriet one day received a volume of Byron's poems containing the Corsair. This she read with wonder and delight, and thenceforth listened eagerly to whatever was said in the house concerning Byron. Not long after, she heard her father say sorrowfully, Byron is dead,--gone I remember, she says, taking my basket for strawberries that afternoon, and going over to a strawberry field on Chestnut Hill. But I was too dispirited to do anything; so I lay down among the daisies, and looked up into the blue sky, and thought of that great eternity into which Byron had entered, and wondered how it might be with his soul ! Harriet was then eleven years old, but was sufficiently precocious to appreciate the genius that was exhibited in Byron's passionate poetry, and to share in the enthusiasm which that genius has everywhere created. Not only in her father's house, and in the family circle
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register, Chapter 16: ecclesiastical History. (search)
ed on the same lot, which was dedicated Jan. 23, 1856. The church was organized April 9, 1847. Its first pastor was Rev. Artemas B. Muzzey, who had for twelve years previously been pastor of the Cambridgeport Parish. His pastorate here commenced Sept. 7, 1846, and continued until Feb. 20, 1854, when his resignation was accepted. He was installed at Concord, N. H., March 29, 1854; but after a pastorate of several years returned to Cambridge, where he now resides, preaching statedly at Chestnut Hill. His successor was Rev. Henry R. Harrington, H. C., 1834, who was ordained 1842, installed here Feb. 11, 1855, and resigned April 1, 1865. He has since been a successful superintendent of public schools in New Bedford. He was succeeded by Rev. Abram W. Stevens, a graduate of the Meadville Divinity School, who was ordained 1862, preached three years in Manchester, N. H., was installed Nov. 26, 1865, and closed his ministry here Nov. 1, 1870. The present pastor, Rev. John P. Bland, a g
eriff of Middlesex) 29 Oct. 1818; Artemas Bowers, b. 21 Sept. 1802, grad. H. C. 1824, ordained at Framingham 10 June 1830, resigned 18 May 1833, installed over Cambridgeport Parish 1 Jan. 1834, resigned 4 May 1846, commenced his ministry with the Lee Street Society 7 Sept. 1846, resigned 20 Feb. 1854, installed at Concord, N. H., 29 Mar. 1854, resigned May 1857, installed at Newburyport 3 Sept. 1857, resigned May 1865, returned to Camb. where he has since resided, preaching statedly at Chestnut Hill, Newton; he has two sons, Henry W., Ll. B. 1855, a lawyer in Camb.; and David P., practised law about a year, enlisted as a private soldier 23 May 1861, served through the war, and was discharged as Lieut.-colonel 8 Oct. 1865, grad. from the Harvard Divinity School 1869; ordained at Littleton Oct. 1869, resigned Ap. 1871, settled at Stow July 1872, resigned Sept. 1876; Abigail, b. 26 Nov. 1804, m. Samuel Chandler 11 Sept. 1834; Amos Otis, b. 11 June 1808, d. 20 Jan. 1812. Mygate, Jos
eriff of Middlesex) 29 Oct. 1818; Artemas Bowers, b. 21 Sept. 1802, grad. H. C. 1824, ordained at Framingham 10 June 1830, resigned 18 May 1833, installed over Cambridgeport Parish 1 Jan. 1834, resigned 4 May 1846, commenced his ministry with the Lee Street Society 7 Sept. 1846, resigned 20 Feb. 1854, installed at Concord, N. H., 29 Mar. 1854, resigned May 1857, installed at Newburyport 3 Sept. 1857, resigned May 1865, returned to Camb. where he has since resided, preaching statedly at Chestnut Hill, Newton; he has two sons, Henry W., Ll. B. 1855, a lawyer in Camb.; and David P., practised law about a year, enlisted as a private soldier 23 May 1861, served through the war, and was discharged as Lieut.-colonel 8 Oct. 1865, grad. from the Harvard Divinity School 1869; ordained at Littleton Oct. 1869, resigned Ap. 1871, settled at Stow July 1872, resigned Sept. 1876; Abigail, b. 26 Nov. 1804, m. Samuel Chandler 11 Sept. 1834; Amos Otis, b. 11 June 1808, d. 20 Jan. 1812. Mygate, Jos
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