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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Peninsular campaign. (search)
idly as circumstances permitted, so that on the 15th the headquarters and the divisions of Franklin, Porter, Sykes, and Smith reached Cumberland Landing; Couch and Casey being near New Kent Court Clark's House, near Howe's saw-mill, Yorktown, General hospital of the Third Corps. From a sketch made April 11, 1862. View of main street, Yorktown, the Union troops marching in. From a sketch made May 4, 1862. House, Hooker and Kearny near Roper's Church, and Richardson and Sedgwick near Eltham. On the 15th and 16th, in the face of dreadful weather and terrible roads, the divisions of Franklin, Porter, and Smith were advanced to White House, and a depot established. On the 18th the Fifth and Sixth Corps were formed, so that the organization of the Army of the Potomac was now as follows: Second Corps, Sumner — Divisions, Sedgwick and Richardson; Third Corps, Heintzelman — Divisions, Kearny and Hooker; Fourth Corps, Keyes — Divisions, Couch and Casey; Fifth Corps, F. J. Porter — D
y back if he attempted to advance from under cover of his gunboats. Pursuant to imperative orders, the men had not been allowed to march with loaded arms during the retreat. On the 7th, at the head of my command, I proceeded in the direction of Eltham's, with the intention to halt and load the muskets upon our arrival at the cavalry outpost. I soon reached the rear of a small cabin upon the crest of the hill, where I found one of our cavalrymen half asleep. The head of the column, marching bthe left flank of the Texans. All the troops engaged showed the finest spirit, were under perfect control, and behaved admirably. The brunt of the contest was borne by the Texans, and to them is due the largest share of the honors of the day at Eltham. The Texas brigade lost eight killed and twentyeight wounded; in the other portions of the command there were twelve wounded and none killed. This affair, which brought the brigade so suddenly and unexpectedly under fire for the first time,
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 5 (search)
Chapter 5 Take command on the Peninsula. General Magruder's defensive preparations. inform War Department of intention to abandon Yorktown. battle of Williamsburg. affair near Eltham. no further interruption to the march. army withdrawn across the Chickahominy. disposition of the Confederate forces in Virginia at this time. advance of General McClellan. reported movement of McDowell. battle of seven Pines. I assumed my new command on the 17th. The arrival of Smith's andiment of cavalry, reported a Federal fleet of vessels-of-war and transports, passing up toward West Point. In the evening Major-General Smith sent me intelligence, to the Burnt Ordinary, that a large body of United States troops had landed at Eltham's, and nearly opposite to West Point, on the southern shore of York River. Early next morning the army was concentrated near Barhamsville. In the mean time General Smith had ascertained that the enemy was occupying a thick wood between the New
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 4: Yorktown and Williamsburg (search)
available. We also brought off about 400 prisoners. As far as possible the wounded were brought into Williamsburg, and soon after dark our march was resumed over roads now even worse than any we had had before. I rode with Johnston's staff, and late in the forenoon of May 6 we were at Barhamsville, and the greater part of the army was halted and resting in the vicinity. It had been a special feature of McClellan's strategy that on our retreat from Yorktown we should be intercepted at Eltham's landing by a large force. But our battle at Williamsburg had proved a double victory, for it had prevented Franklin's division from being reenforced so as to be either formidable or aggressive. It arrived at the mouth of the Pamunkey at 5 P. M. on the 6th. During the night it disembarked and next morning reconnoitred its vicinity and took a defensive position, sending Newton's and Slocum's brigades through a large wood to examine the country beyond. On the far edge of that wood about
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Custis, George Washington Parke 1781- (search)
Custis, George Washington Parke 1781- adopted son of George Washington; born in Mount Airy, Md., April 30, 1781; was a grandson of Mrs. Washington. His father was John Parke Custis, and his mother was Eleanor Calvert, of Maryland. At the siege of Yorktown his father was aide-de-camp to Washington; was seized with camp-fever; retired to Eltham, and there died before Washington (who hastened thither immediately after the surrender) could reach his bedside. Washington afterwards adopted his two children—Eleanor Parke and George Washington Parke Custis—as his own. Their early home was at Mount Vernon. George was educated partly at Princeton, and was eighteen years of age at the time of Washington's death, who made him an executor of his will and left him a handsome estate, on which he lived, until his death, Oct. 10, 1857, in literary, artistic, and agricultural pursuits. In his early days Mr. Custis was an eloquent speaker; and in his later years he produced a series of histor
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Washingtoniana. -1857 (search)
not hit him. Fifteen years afterwards, when Washington was in the Ohio country, this chief travelled many miles to see the man who he and his followers, who tried to shoot him, were satisfied was under the protection of the Great Spirit. He said he had a dozen fair shots at him, but could not hit him. John Parke Custis, an only son of Mrs. Washington, by a former husband, was aide to the commander-in-chief at Yorktown, at the beginning of the siege. Seized with camp-fever, he retired to Eltham, the seat of Colonel Bassett, a kinsman, where he died. At the conclusion of the ceremonies at the surrender of Cornwallis, Washington hastened to the bed- Fac-Simile of Washington's order against profanity. Washington in 1789 (from savage's portrait). side of his dying step-son. He was met at the door by Dr. Craik, who told him that all was over. The chief bowed his head, and, giving vent to his sorrow by a flood of tears, he turned to the weeping widow—mother of four children—and s
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 10: the march to the Chickahominy. (search)
nd day after reaching West Point, the troops began the long, dreary march up the Peninsula, through rain and mud to the Chickahominy River. They first marched to Eltham, four miles distant, and remained there several days, while the engineer corps were building miles of corduroy roads and bridges. Here the men began to break down very fast and there was much sickness. While at Eltham many of the men were greatly interested in watching the landing of cattle. The beeves would be hoisted over the side of a flat boat, which had been towed up, and let into the river to swim ashore. The water was not deep at this point, and the soft muddy flats extended fe dressed for issue, and the live beeves would be corralled and driven forward to follow the army with other commissary stores, and slaughtered as needed. From Eltham, General Sumner's Corps marched slowly by short stages in consequence of the intolerable condition of the roads, to the Chickahominy, halting successively at Cumb
, James, .................................................... 291 Eleventh Maine Regiment,.................... ..................... 360 Ellers, Heindrick, ................................................ 341 Ellery, William,................................................. 249 Elliot, William, ..................................................... 359 Ellis, Alfred,...................................................... 322 Ellsworth, Milton,.................. .........269, 285, 328 Eltham, Va., .................................................... 71 Ely's Ford,............................ ...... ... .......... 303 Embler, Capt., A. Henry,....................... ................ 350 Estes, William P. R.,.................................. .......... 248, 328 Evans, General,..................................................... 28 Ewell, General, .................................. ............... 225 Fair Oaks, Va.,..................................... ...... 74, 75, 79, 86
miles from Williamsburg, early in the morning of the 7th, and on that day the Confederate army was concentrated in the vicinity of Barhamsville, some 8 miles southwest of the head of the York. The Federal army rested at Williamsburg, satisfied that it was not prudent to follow a foe whose rear guard had handled them so roughly the day before. As soon as Yorktown was evacuated, McClellan ordered Franklin's division to be promptly moved, by water, to the head of the York and disembarked at Eltham's landing, on the south side of that river, in the immediate vicinity of Johnston's line of retreat, which he hoped to intercept. Franklin arrived by 3 p. m. of the 6th, and before day of the 7th had disembarked his division, which was followed in rapid succession by those of Porter, Sedgwick and Richardson. The accompanying gunboats covered Franklin's landing, and the broad arms of the York protected his flanks. He promptly occupied a belt of forest in his front, not far from the road le
begun its on to Richmond, but its every movement had been a failure. Jackson, with a small force in hand, had with strategic power routed or demoralized and then left stranded in the Valley 60,000 of its best men, during a month and a half of this quarter of a year. First Magruder, and then J. E. Johnston, had delayed and badly damaged the march of the main body, under the leadership of McClellan in person, on the Peninsula, keeping him back with fierce blows at Williamsburg, Yorktown and Eltham's landing, and by a bold front at Seven Pines and Fair Oaks, held him hesitating in sight of Richmond. Lee, taking immediate command after the wounding of Johnston, had gathered from all directions his scattered forces, hurled them fiercely upon Mc-Clellan's lines and intrenchments, and after seven days of fierce contention at Ellison's mill, Gaines' mill, Charles City cross-roads and Malvern hill, had driven him back, followed by dire disaster, and left him stranded on the banks of the Jam
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