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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 65 31 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 18 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 17 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 12 0 Browse Search
Allan Pinkerton, The spy in the rebellion; being a true history of the spy system of the United States Army during the late rebellion, revealing many secrets of the war hitherto not made public, compiled from official reports prepared for President Lincoln , General McClellan and the Provost-Marshal-General . 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 12 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Allan Pinkerton, The spy in the rebellion; being a true history of the spy system of the United States Army during the late rebellion, revealing many secrets of the war hitherto not made public, compiled from official reports prepared for President Lincoln , General McClellan and the Provost-Marshal-General .. You can also browse the collection for Gloucester Point (Virginia, United States) or search for Gloucester Point (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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length and five feet in width, carrying three sails-main, fore and jib. His route was from Gloucester Point, York river, to Eastville, and his business was to transfer from one side of the bay to theut fourteen miles, then south-west by west for ten or twelve miles, then due west again to Gloucester Point. The entire run was made in three and a half hours, the sailing distance being about thirty miles. On nearing Gloucester Point, they were hailed by a sentinel, with the usual challenge: Who comes there? The blockade-runner sent back the answer: Marshall-mail boat! Stag morning Webster was up and astir at an early hour. He ascertained that the encampment at Gloucester Point consisted of two regiments of infantry, two companies of cavalry, and one field battery of outh. General Magruder had command of this division of the army, including the forces at Gloucester Point, Yorktown and all the peninsula bounded by the James and York rivers, extending down to For
to the office of the Provost-Marshal, where they obtained the necessary passes to insure their safe journey through the rebel lines. Leaving Richmond, they went to Fredericksburg, where he stayed long enough to visit all the places of interest around that city, and in company with Mr. Price they went on to Brooks Station, the headquarters of General Holmes, with whom Price was intimately acquainted. After remaining several days, he left his companion, making his way to Yorktown and Gloucester Point, and from thence to Washington, where he reported to me. This first visit of Timothy Webster to Richmond was highly successful. Not only had he made many friends in that city, who would be of service to him on subsequent trips, but the information he derived was exceedingly valuable. He was able to report very correctly the number and strength of the fortifications around the rebel capital, to estimate the number of troops and their sources of supplies, and also the forts between t