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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of Jackson's infantry ( foot cavalry ). (search)
y own observation, one like so many which are familiar to us all, and illustrative, as I think, of the tone and temper of the brave hearts that beat beneath the ragged jackets of gray — gray only for a time, and then stained with every hue from cloud and storm, from rain and sunshine, from the dust of the march and from the patriot blood that flowed through diminished veins from honorable wounds. In May, 1862, just after the battle of McDowell, the army of the immortal Jackson lay near Harrisonburg in the Valley of Virginia, while the magnificently equipped army of the enemy, commanded by General Banks, was entrenched at Strasburg, meditating a further advance, while harassing and humiliating the noble people of the Valley in their rear. In order to dislodge him, or, if possible, to get in his rear at Middletown, by way of the Page Valley, and destroy him, Jackson ordered his army to cook three days rations, and to be placed in light marching order. The next morning at dawn the ma
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Visit of a Confederate cavalryman to a Federal General's headquarters. (search)
Visit of a Confederate cavalryman to a Federal General's headquarters. by Robert W. North. In the summer of 1862, Ashby's brigade was encamped below Harrisonburg, about two miles distant from the town, on the Valley Pike. One Friday morning I was feeding my horse, when Lieutenant Rouss, company B, Twelfth Virginia cavalry, ordered me to report to Headquarters of the regiment. Upon my reporting to the adjutant, he informed me that I was to be the safe-guard to a captured Federal surgeon; that I must report in an hour, armed and mounted, and that I was to protect him from any violence while he was inside of our lines. He said that the surgeon was expected to take care of himself while traveling the fifty miles of neutral ground that lay between our pickets and those of the enemy. On my return to the company, I told the men that I was going to Winchester with a Yankee surgeon, and that if they had any letters they wanted sent home, now was their opportunity. The homes of a grea