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Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 58 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 58 0 Browse Search
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 17 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 14 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 14 0 Browse Search
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 14 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Jetersville (Virginia, United States) or search for Jetersville (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—the war in the South-West. (search)
lost by this going to and fro. During this time the severity of the weather renders the least operation impossible in the upper valleys of the Alleghanies. The Confederates have experienced it. General Vance, having endeavored to penetrate from North Carolina into the Tennessee Valley at the head of a small force of five hundred cavalry, of whom one hundred and fifty were Indians, crossed the chain of the Smoky Mountains, and, coming down near Knoxville, captured a Federal train near Jetersville; but the enemy starting at once to pursue him, he finds himself driven to the foot of the mountains, which the snow and the ice render impassable. He divided his force: one detachment succeeded in getting back to North Carolina. The remainder under his direction endeavored to pass through the gap of Big Pigeon River, but, soon overtaken by the enemy, the Southerners after a small fight were compelled to surrender January 15th. In the mean time, the weather having moderated in the mo