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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 16 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 19, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 4 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 2 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Jonesville (Virginia, United States) or search for Jonesville (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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llicoffer (formerly Union Station), East Tennessee, where 150 of the 62d North Carolina, Maj. McDowell, were surprised and captured without a shot, and the railroad bridge, 720 feet long, over the Holston, destroyed, with 700 small arms and much other material of war. Pushing on ten miles, to Clinch's Station, Carter had a little fight, captured 75 prisoners, and destroyed the railroad bridge, 400 feet long, over the Watauga, with a locomotive and several cars; returning thence by Jonesville, Lee county, Va., recrossing the Cumberland range at Hauk's Gap; and, after two or three smart skirmishes, returning in triumph to his old quarters; having lost but 20 men, mainly prisoners — and killed or captured over 500. Having been ridden all but incessantly 690 miles, with very little to eat, many of his horses gave out and were left to die on the return. Gen. Wheeler, in chief command of Bragg's cavalry, 4,500 strong, with Forrest and Wharton as Brigadiers, passing Rosecrans's army by
Xxvi. West Virginia and North of the Rapidan in 1864. Sam Jones captures Beers at Jonesville Rosser takes Petersburg Averill hits him at Springfield Sigel's defeat at Newmarket Averill worsted at Wytheville Crook's fight near Dublin Station Hunter's victory at Piedmont he takes Staunton, and advances to Lynchburg retreats across the Alleghauies Early chases Sigel out of Virginia Wallace beaten on the Monocacy Early threatens Washington Wright repulsed by Early Avery worsly encouraging results for some months, but with ultimately overwhelming success. Before Gen. Grant had been placed in chief command, there had been several collisions in western and northern Virginia. The first occurred Jan. 3, 1864. at Jonesville, in the extreme west of old Virginia, near Cumberland gap, held by Maj. Beers with 300 Illinoisans and 3 guns, who were surrounded, surprised, and captured by Sam. Jones, after a smart contest, in which our loss was 60. The excuse for holding
87. Harrison, Mo., 557. Harrisonburg, Va., 137. Hartsville, Mo., 447. Hartsville, Tenn., 271. Hatchie River, Miss., 230. Haymarket, Va., 182. Henderson's Hill, La., 537. Holly Springs, Miss., 286. Honey Hill, S. C., 696. Honey Springs, I. T., 449. Independence, Mo., 36; 560. Jackson, Miss., 317. James Island, S. C., 475. James River, Va., 727. Jefferson, Va., 395. Jenkins's Ferry, Ark., 553. Jericho Ford. Va., 577. Johnsonville, Tenn., 679. Jonesboroa, Ga., 636. Jonesville, Va., 598. Kelly's Ford, Va., 98. Kernstown, Va., 114. Kingsport, Tenn., 688. Kinston, N. C., 80. Kirksville Mo., 35. Knoxville, Tenn., 432. Lavergne, Tenn., 281. Lawrence. Kansas, 450. Lebanon, Ky., 405. Lewisburg, Va., 140. Little Osage, Mo., 561. London, Ky., 213. Lovejoy's, Ga., 635; 690. Lynehburg, Va., 601. Macon, Ga., 634; 691. Manassas Gap, Va., 601. do. Junction, Va., 180. Mansura., La., 551. Marion. Va., 688. Marks's Mill, Ark., 553. Martinsburg., Va