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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 48 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 38 0 Browse Search
Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 34 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 24 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 20 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 16 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 14 0 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Monterey (Virginia, United States) or search for Monterey (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 10: General Mitchel's invasion of Alabama.--the battles of Shiloh. (search)
our intrenchments at Corinth, which we can hold. He had sent a flag of truce that morning from Monterey, where he had a hospital, asking Grant to allow him to send mounted men to the battle-field, toly and very picturesque. On that ridge we came to the site of the once pretty little hamlet of Monterey, where the only building that remained was a store-house, which the Confederates had used for aNear it was a ruined house, around which were the remains of what had Confederate hospital at Monterey. doubtless been a fine flower-garden. From Monterey to some distance beyond Lick Creek the Monterey to some distance beyond Lick Creek the country was hilly, very little cleared, and less cultivated, dotted here and there with miserable log-houses, and mostly covered with woods. Half-way between Monterey and Shiloh Meeting-house we crosMonterey and Shiloh Meeting-house we crossed the recently overflowed Lick Creek Bottom, partly upon a log causeway built by the National army when moving on Corinth, and partly in the deep mud. Driftwood had been floated into barricades on t
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 11: operations in Southern Tennessee and Northern Mississippi and Alabama. (search)
t, and was sent up the Tennessee, accompanied by the gun-boats as far as East-port, to destroy the Memphis and Charleston railway over Big Bear Creek, between Iuka and Tuscumbia, and cut off Corinth from the latter place, where Colonel Turchin had large supplies. This expedition was arranged before Halleck arrived, and was successfully carried out, after which such demonstrations ceased for a while. No movement of importance was again made toward Corinth until about the first of May, when Monterey, nine or ten miles in that direction, was occupied by National troops. General Pope had arrived in the mean time, April 22, 1862. with the Army of Missouri, twenty-five thousand strong, and these, with some regiments from Curtis, in Arkansas, made Halleck's forces a little over one hundred thousand in number. General Mitchel, in the mean time, with his few troops and the cordial assistance of the negroes, who acted as spies and informers, General Mitchel informed the writer, late in
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 15: the Army of the Potomac on the Virginia Peninsula. (search)
orm a strong column for the purpose of moving beyond the Rappahannock, to cut off the enemy's communication between Winchester and Alexandria. --Autograph letter of Robert E. Lee. This was precisely such a movement as the Government anticipated, and which might have resulted in the capture of Washington, had not the corps of McDowell been left for its defense. when he was startled by the information that one of Fremont's brigades, under General Milroy, was approaching from the direction of Monterey, either to join Banks or to fall upon Staunton. He perceived that such a junction, or the occupation of Staunton, might give to the, Nationals the possession of the, Shenandoah Valley, and he took immediate measures to prevent the catastrophe. Leaving Ewell to watch Banks, he moved rapidly upon Staunton, and from that point sent Johnson, with five brigades, to attack Milroy. The latter, greatly outnumbered, fell back to the Bull Pasture Mountains and took post at McDowell, thirty-six mil