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risk of losing them. I asked him what he would do if he should come across an American ship under British colors with a register from a British consul? He said that he should take her as a prize unless she had a British register in due form from a British custom-house. They commenced plundering the Redgauntlet at the moment of capture, and in smooth water plundered her from day to day. On the eighteenth of June, I, with ten others, were put on board the Italian brig Duo Fratelli, from Montevideo for Antwerp. We saw the Florida and Redgauntlet last on Friday, June nineteenth, in latitude fifteen degrees forty minutes north, longitude forty degrees west, both standing to the northward. They were only waiting for a smooth day to finish plundering the Redgauntlet before destroying her. She was pretty well plundered before I left the Florida. The provisions put on board for us were two barrels of beef, thirty tins of crackers, ten pounds of coffee, one half bushel of beans, and twen
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., chapter 48 (search)
he fact was, he was anxious to get rid of his prisoners who were eating him out of house and home. On the morning of the 1st of March the Alabama captured the fine ship John A. Parks, of Hallowell, Maine. Her cargo, consisting of lumber for Montevideo, was. covered by the seals of the British consul, and was as neutral as any cargo could be. But the ship was burned, nevertheless. A large quantity of newspapers were taken from the Parks. which, as they contained many unflattering notices ofe evidence against the neutral ownership of anything on board a prize; so the crew of the Jabez Snow were promptly removed, and the vessel set on fire. On the 2d of June, the Alabama fell in with the clipper bark Amazonian, from New York for Montevideo, with an assorted cargo. Semmes remarks: There was an attempt to cover two of the consiginments in this ship, but the Court of Admiralty decided that the bark being evidently Yankee, the certificates were not worth a cent! So the ship was plu
boats below New-Orleans; Vicksburgh; Port Hudson; and present at the surrender of New-Orleans. 26. Thomas Atkinson (yeoman) is recommended for coolness and energy in supplying the rifle ammunition, which was under his sole charge, in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864. He was a petty officer on board the United States frigate Congress with me in 1842-46; was present and assisted in capturing the whole of the Buenos Ayrean fleet by that vessel off Montevideo. Joined the Richmond in September, 1860; was in the actions with Fort McRae; the head of the passes of the Mississippi; Forts Jackson and St. Philip; the Chalmettes; the rebel iron-clads and gunboats below New-Orleans; Vicksburgh; Port Hudson; and at the surrender of New-Orleans. 27. David Sprowls (Orderly Sergeant of marine guard) is recommended for coolness and for setting a good example to the marine guard, working a division of great guns in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Diplomatic service. (search)
l, Seoul. Liberia. Owen L. W. Smith, Minister Resident and Consul-General, Monrovia. Mexico. Powell Clayton, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, Mexico. Netherlands. Stanford Newel, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, The Hague. Nicaragua and Salvador. William L. Merry, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, San Jose. (See Costa Rica.) Paraguay and Uruguay. William R. Finch, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Montevideo. Persia. Herbert W. Bowen, Minister Resident and Consul-General, Teheran. Peru. Irving B. Dudley, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Lima. Portugal. John N. Irwin, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Lisbon. Russia. Charlemagne Tower, Ambassador Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, St. Petersburg. Siam. Hamilton King, Minister Resident and Consul-General, Bangkok. Spain. Bellamy Storer, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Oregon, (search)
cisco, where she was built, to the Atlantic coast. She left San Francisco March 19, and arrived at Callao, Peru, April 4, where she took on coal; reached Sandy Point April 18, and again took on coal; reached Rio de Janeiro April 30, Bahia May 8, Barbadoes May 18, and Jupiter Inlet, Florida, May 24. The entire distance run was 14,706 knots, at an expenditure of 4,155 tons of coal. While in Rio de Janeiro, Captain Clark received word that the Spanish torpedo-boat Temerario had sailed from Montevideo with the intention of United States battle-ship Oregon. destroying the Oregon. Captain Clark notified the Brazilian authorities that if the Temerario entered the harbor with hostile intention, she would be attacked; and at the same time left orders with the commander of the United States cruiser Marietta to keep a search-light on the entrance to the harbor, and in case the Temerario appeared, to notify her commander that if she approached within half a mile of the Oregon she would be d
ee P. M. we made the remarkable island, or rather, mountain of rock, called in the beautiful Spanish, Alta Vela, or Tall Sail, from its resemblance to a ship under sail, at a distance. It rises, at a distance of ten or twelve miles from the main island of St. Domingo, with almost perpendicular sides, to the height of several hundred feet, and affords a foothold for no living creature, but the sea-gull, the gannet, and other water-fowl. Soon after nightfall, we boarded a Spanish brig from Montevideo, bound for Havana; and at eleven P. M., Alta Vela bearing north, and being distant from us, about five miles, we hove to, with a shot, another sail, that was running down the coast. She was a rakish-looking hermaphrodite brig, and in the bright moonlight looked Yankee. The report of our heavy gun, reverberated by a hundred echoes from Alta Vela, had a magical effect upon the little craft. Flying like a sea-gull before a gale only a moment before, she became, in an instant, like the same
the John A. Parks, of Hallowell, Maine. The cargo of the Parks consisted of white pine lumber which she had taken on board at New York, and she was bound to Montevideo, or Buenos Ayres, as the consignee might elect. There was an affidavit found among her papers, made by one Snyder, before a Mr. Edwards Pierrepont, who appearser, were, that one Davidson, a lumber dealer in New York had chartered the ship, and shipped the lumber, in the usual course of his business, to the parties in Montevideo; that he had paid most of the freight, in advance, and insured himself against the war risk, both upon the cargo and the freight. The manner in which this casep the old flag, and then the Nora, of the same pious city, follows her example. They were both laden with salt, and both from Liverpool. The Hill was bound to Montevideo, or Buenos Ayres, and there was no attempt to cover her cargo. The Nora was bound to Calcutta, under a charter-party with one W. N. de Mattos. In the bill of
oss of rest. The chase commenced about two A. M., and it was half-past 7 A. M., before we were near enough to heave the fugitive to, with a gun. She proved to be the Jabez Snow, of Buckport, Maine, last from Cardiff, with a cargo of coal, for Montevideo. On the back of the bill of lading was the following certificate: We certify that the cargo of coals per Jabez Snow, for which this is the bill of lading, is the bonafide property of Messrs. Wilson, Helt, Lane & Co., and that the same are Britand backed his main yard, and hoisted the Federal colors. We were alongside of him about half-past 11 A. M.—the chase having lasted eight hours. The prize proved to be the bark Amazonian of Boston, from New York, with an assorted cargo, for Montevideo. There was an attempt to cover two of the consignments of this ship, in favor of French citizens, but the hash being evidently Yankee, the certificates were disregarded. The prisoners, and such plunder as we desired, being brought on board th
e had ventured to place us at defiance. Under these circumstances the President deemed it advisable to send with our commissioner to Paraguay, Hon. James B. Bowlin, a naval force sufficient to exact justice should negotiation fail. Message 19th Dec., 1859. This consisted of nineteen armed vessels, great and small, carrying two hundred guns and twenty-five hundred sailors and marines, all under the command of the veteran and gallant Shubrick. Soon after the arrival of the expedition at Montevideo, Commissioner Bowlin and Commodore Shubrick proceeded (30th December, 1858) to ascend the rivers to Asuncion in the steamer Fulton, accompanied by the Water Witch. Meanwhile the remaining vessels rendezvoused in the Parana, near Rosario, a position from which they could act promptly, in case of need. The commissioner arrived at Asuncion on the 25th January, 1859, and left it on the 10th February. Within this brief period he had ably and successfully accomplished all the objects of his
Naval intelligence. --The U. S. steamer Seminole sailed from Montevideo Jan. 21, for Buenos Ayres. The U. S. frigate Congress, from Rio Janeiro, and the U. S. steamer Pulaski (flag-ship,) from Buenos Ayres, were at Montevideo Jan. 31. Naval intelligence. --The U. S. steamer Seminole sailed from Montevideo Jan. 21, for Buenos Ayres. The U. S. frigate Congress, from Rio Janeiro, and the U. S. steamer Pulaski (flag-ship,) from Buenos Ayres, were at Montevideo Jan. 31.
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