Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Paris (Virginia, United States) or search for Paris (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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e carrying of mail matter by individuals being considered in the light of treasonable communication with the enemy, in a few days we shall have but scant opportunity of enriching our columns with interesting intelligence from the other side of the border. We might get an occasional budget by the way of Havana, but we suppose it is intended by the despotic clique at Washington that the blockade shall prevent that. Won't it be queer to read, hereafter, the latest news from way down east, via Paris and London? Well, we suppose we can stand it as well as they can on the other side of the line. Let us see who will first get tired of the embargo. The First Regiment N. Y. Volunteers, Col. Allen, left New York for the seat of war.--(Doc. 196.) Funeral ceremonies over the body of Col. Ellsworth took place in Washington. The remains lay in state in the east room of the President's house for several hours. Owing to the immense throng of anxious gazers on the remains of the de
. Of course the localities are selected with a view to privacy and remoteness from the inquisitive eyes of the watchman. Careful espionage may bring to light the object of these nocturnal consultations. The Twentieth, Twenty-first, and Twenty-fourth Regiments of Pennsylvania militia left Philadelphia for Chambersburg.--N. Y. Commercial, May 30. Colonel Mann's Regiment of Pennsylvania militia, arrived at Easton, Pa., and went into camp.--(Doc. 214.) The American citizens in Paris favorable to the Union breakfasted together in the Hotel du Louvre. About one hundred and fifty attended, of whom one-third were ladies, including the wife of General Scott. Mr. Cowdin presided. Resolutions were adopted, pledging the meeting to maintain the Union under any circumstances. Mr. Dayton, the U. S. Minister, said that, since his arrival in France, he could detect no unfriendly feeling on the part of France to the United States, and certainly no French citizen would be found amo
and twenty marines. The Charleston Mercury published the following on the Confederate Commissioners in Europe: It is now several months since our commissioners were sent to Europe. Thus far it seems they have got no further than England. Mr. Rost, one of them, has gone over to France; but as he can have no authority to act alone, we presume that he goes rather to ascertain the views of the Emperor of the French than to make a treaty. We infer from Mr. Rost's departure from London to Paris that nothing has been accomplished in England. Indeed, from the order in Council forbidding Confederate privateers bringing their prizes into British ports, we are only surprised that any of the Commissioners should have remained in London a day after this new order was issued. This is an act of quasi hostility, which, it appears to us, ought to have arrested a conference with the British authorities. It was well known that, whilst Great Britain has the greatest interest in the independ
ositions. Col. Barnes is distinguished for having been in the same class with Jeff. Davis, at West Point, graduating A one, when Jeff. was No. twenty-seven, in a class of thirty-one. Lieut.-Col. Ingraham was in the Massachusetts Fourth, stationed at Fortress Monroe. Major Hayes is a graduate of Harvard College, and quite popular. Adjutant Hodge was an officer of the Massachusetts Fifth, and distinguished himself at Bull Run, saving the life of Col. Lawrence. Surgeon Smith was educated in Paris, and was connected with Major Cobb's battery. Other officers of the regiment have seen active service. Most of the men are farmers and mechanics, of moderate means, excellent health, and unwavering devotion to the cause of the Union.--N. Y. Times, August 28. A correspondent of the Philadelphia Inquirer gives an extended account of a visit of the privateer Sumter to Puerto Cabello, together with a copy of a letter from Raphael Semmes, her commander, to the governor of that place.--(Doc
October 13. A successful reconnoissance was this (lay made by a force of Union troops under the command of General Stahel, in the vicinity of Paris, Snicker's Gap, and Leesburgh, Virginia. More than one hundred prisoners were taken and paroled; important information was obtained, and the command returned to its headquarters at Centreville, without losing a man.--New York Times, October 16. The Sixth regiment Missouri State militia, under command of Colonel Catherwood, returned to camp at Sedalia, Missouri, after a successful scouting expedition, in which they broke up and dispersed several bands of rebel guerrillas, killing about fifty of their number. They took prisoner Colonel William H. McCoun, of the rebel army. The expedition to Jacksonville, Florida, this day returned to Hilton Head, South-Carolina, when General J. M. Brannan made a report to the Secretary of the Navy, announcing the complete success of the expedition — the capture of the rebel fortification a
cket-duty near Hartwood Church, about fifteen miles from Falmouth, Va., the first and third squadrons of the Third Pennsylvania cavalry, belonging to General Averill's brigade, were suddenly attacked by a numerically superior force of rebel cavalry, and after a brief resistance, in which four of the Unionists were killed and nine wounded, were finally taken prisoners. An important reconnoissance was this day made by a large Union force under the command of General Stahel, to Upperville, Paris, Ashby's Gap, Snickersville, Berryville, etc.--(Doc. 50.) An expedition consisting of five thousand infantry and two thousand cavalry, under the command of General A. P. Hovey, yesterday left Helena, Ark., and to-day arrived at Delta, Miss., for the purpose of cutting the road and telegraph wires, on the Tennessee and Mississippi railroads, and creating a panic in the rebel forces under General Price. Bridges on both roads were destroyed, together with two locomotives and thirty or for