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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 30 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 21 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 27, 1864., [Electronic resource] 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 10 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 5, 1864., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 10 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 8 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 8 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Saltville (Virginia, United States) or search for Saltville (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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re needed to repel the advance of Crook from the west. Crook had moved from Charlestown simultaneously with Sigel's advance from Winchester; and — as if to preclude the last chance of ultimate success — had divided his command; sending Averill, with 2,000 cavalry, to destroy the lead-mines near Wytheville, while he advanced farther to the left. But when Averill reached May 10. Wytheville, he found there John Morgan, with a formidable cavalry force dispatched by Gen. W. E. Jones from Saltville; and a stubborn fight came off, wherein Averill was clearly worsted. He tries in his General Order to make the result a drawn fight against overwhelming numbers ; but, as he does not claim to have destroyed the leadworks, nor taken the town, nor achieved anything in particular, save that the purposes of the enemy were foiled by the engagement, there is no room for doubt that he was virtually beaten. Gen. Crook, with 11 regiments, numbering some 6,000 men, had made directly for the Virg
Bean's Station, Charleston, Mossy creek, Dandridge and Maryville, East Tennessee Morgan's last raid into Kentucky Hobson's surrender Burbridge strikes Morgan at Mt. Sterling, and routs him near Cynthiana Morgan killed Burbridge beaten at Saltville, Va. attempt on Johnson's Island. during the Autumn, Winter, and Spring of 1863-4, and the ensuing Summer, a great number of desultory, indecisive expeditions were impelled by one side or the other, which, though they exerted no considerable is from Bull's gap to catch him. Burbridge was detained for weeks in Kentucky, reorganizing and remounting his overmarched force; when he resumed the movement which had been arrested by Morgan's raid. He struck directly for the salt-works at Saltville, near Abingdon; where he found himself confronted Oct. 2. in strong force by Breckinridge, by whom he was beaten off, with a loss of 350 men, including Col. Mason, 11th Michigan, killed. He drew off during tile night after the conflict, all
Overton's Hill stormed and taken Rebels routed and pursued to Franklin their losses Hood chased across the Tennessee Lyon's feeble raid Stoneman in East Tennessee Gillem outs Duke, and then Vaughn Breckinridge driven into North Carolina Saltville captured Thomas's captures Hood relieved. Gen. Thomas had been detached by Gen. Sherman from his main army in Georgia, and sent back to assume chief command in Tennessee, in doubt as to what were Hood's real intentions. It was obvious eno his force quite too slender, retreated across the mountains into North Carolina during the night; losing a few wagons and caissons by our pursuit, which was not long persisted in. This retreat — doubtless, inevitably — abandoned to its fate Saltville, with its extensive and costly saltworks, hitherto successfully guarded and defended; and it now fell to Stoneman without a struggle: 8 guns, 2 locomotives, many horses and mules, and a large quantity of ammunition, being here captured. The sa
t Conway, Va., 394. Port Gibson, Miss., 297. Port Republic. Va., 139. Ponnd Gap, Ky., 42. Prairie d'anne. Ark., 552. Prestonburg. Ky., 42. Pulaski, Tenn., 678. Quaker Road. Va., 730. Rappahannock Station, 394. Reams's do. (Wilson), 588. Red Hill, Ala., 688. Resaca, Ga., 626. Rivers's Bridge, S. C., 697. Rock House, W. Va., 599. Rocky Face Gap. Ga., 626. Rogersville, Tenn., 430. Romney, W. Va., 352. Sabine Pass, La., 326. Salem, Ind., 405. Salisbury. N. C., 751. Saltville, Va., 624. Scottsboroa, Ala., 687. Seviersville, Tenn., 623. Shelbyville, Tenn., 409. Shenandoah, Va., 605. Shepherdstown, Md., 393. Solemn Grove, N. C., 705. Somerset, Ky., 427. Somerville, Tenn., 616. South Mills, N. C., 80 Spring Hill, Tenn., 284. Springfield, Mo., 447. Springfield, W. Va., 599. St. Charles, Ark., 554. Stony Creek, Va., 588. Strasburg, Va., 612. Suffolk, Va., 366. Sutherlands Depot, Va., 734. Talladega, Ala., 631. Tebb's Bend, Ky., 404. Thoroughfare Gap