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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 30 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 21 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 27, 1864., [Electronic resource] 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 10 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 5, 1864., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 10 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 8 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 8 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Saltville (Virginia, United States) or search for Saltville (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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f the Federal army, from east Tennessee into southwest Virginia, mainly for the purpose of destroying the salt works at Saltville, from which not only the State of Virginia and the Confederate armies, but also adjacent States of the Confederacy, drethe northeast. A small body of militia, under General Preston, occupied the earthworks that defended the salt works at Saltville. Pushing forward with great energy, and having at his command some 5,500 men, nearly twice as many as Breckinridge c's and Duke's commands before him, and pressing on passed Glade Spring, paying no attention to the Confederate force at Saltville, until he was delayed, by an action at Marion, on the 16th, but only for a short time, as his superior force enabled hi salt works and greatly damaged that important and indispensable salt-making establishment. On the 22d he retired from Saltville. Burbridge's portion of his command then returned westward, by the way of Pound gap, on the 27th, to Catlettsburg, at
soners. Soon afterward an unfortunate break in his relations with General Stuart, which had existed since the fall of 1861, became so intensified as to have serious results. Col. O. R. Funsten was given temporary command of the brigade, and on October 9th General Jones was ordered to report for duty in southwest Virginia. There he organized an excellent cavalry brigade, with which he co-operated with Longstreet in east Tennessee, and in November defeated the enemy near Rogersville. At Saltville, Va., in May, 1864, with Gen. John H. Morgan, he foiled Averell's designs against that post, defeated the Federals at Wytheville, and pursued them to Dublin. On May 23d he was assigned to command of the department of Southwest Virginia in the absence of General Breckinridge. It was at that moment a position of great importance, as the district was in a turmoil on account of the incursions of Averell and Crook and Sigel, and Hunter was preparing to advance on Lynchburg. Early in June three