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e position could not be ascertained, Jackson was busily engaged along our lines, making — every disposition for the morrow. From dusty and weary scouts who arrived during night, we ascertained something regarding the true position of Banks's army. A few of these adventurous spirits had been prowling about the enemy's encampments in different parts of the country, and had discovered the following facts: One of the enemy's army corps, under Sigel, was on their right among the hills at Sperryville, watching the roads and all direct communication with their rear at Mount Washington, Warrenton, and Manassas Junction; a heavy force was stationed on Pope's left, at or near Waterloo on the Rappahannock, while somewhat to the rear of Banks and Pope was McDowell's corps. It was concluded with reason that these various bodies would be unable to appear upon the field to assist Banks, should Jackson force him to engage on the following day, (Saturday, August ninth.) During the night, pi
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War., From the Rapidan to Frying-Pan in October, 1863. (search)
choly pleasure to recall the gallant face of Gordon, now that he is dead; to remember his charming smile, his gay humour; the elegant little speech which he made as he gallantly presented a nosegay to the fair Miss H , bowing low as he did so amid friendly laughter. When he fell he left behind him no braver soldier or kindlier gentleman. Ii. At dawn Stuart was again in the saddle, pressing forward upon the retiring enemy. Ewell and Hill had moved unseen to their position on the Sperryville road, thanks to the stand of Stuart at James City; and now, for the first time, the enemy seemed to understand the nature of the blow about to be struck. General Meade had put his army in motion toward the Rappahannock; and, as the advance force in our front retired, Stuart pressed them closely. It is hard to say whether this great soldier was better in falling back or in advancing. When he retired he was the soul of stubborn obstinacy. When he advanced he was all fire, dash, and imp
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 21: invasion of Pennsylvania. (search)
on the various battlefields. There was a very great deficiency in shoes for the infantry, a large number of the men being indifferently shod, and some barefooted. A like deficiency existed in regard to the equipment of the men in other respects, the supply of clothing, blankets, etc., being very limited. On the 11th of June, Ewell's corps resumed the march, taking the road from the lower Shenandoah Valley across the Blue Ridge at Chester Gap. Johnson's division, followed by mine, moved on the road by Sperryville, and Little Washington through the gap, and Rodes' division on a road further to the right through the same gap. Late in the day of the 12th, my division reached Front Royal, Rodes' and Johnson's having preceded it, crossing both forks of the Shenandoah near that place. Two of my brigades, Hoke's and Smith's, were crossed over both of the forks that night. Hays' and Gordon's and Jones' artillery with the division trains remained on the east side of the South Branch.
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 25: retreat to Virginia. (search)
Front Royal below the forks, which he ordered to be taken up during the night, and to be transported up the Valley pike under my protection. Accordingly I moved by the way of Cedarville next day to get the pontoon train, and then crossed to the Valley pike, following the route taken by General Jackson's corps the fall before and arriving at Madison Court-House on the 28th, in the neighborhood of which I found the other divisions which had come through Thornton's Gap and by the way of Sperryville. I had to use the pontoon train for crossing the Shenandoah, as that river was up, and I then sent it up the Valley to Staunton. After remaining near Madison Court-House until the 31st I moved to the vicinity of the Robinson River, near the road from Liberty Mills to Culpeper Court-House, and the next day I crossed the Robinson just above its mouth into Culpeper and then the Rapidan at the railroad station, and encamped near Pisgah Church about four miles from the station, the other
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
rry, 396 Snicker's Gap, 164, 396 Snodgrass, Major C. E., 187 Soldiers' Home, 391 Somerville Ford, 106, 237, 302 South Anna, 351, 361, 465 South Branch, 239, 327, 322-24, 337, 368, 386, 398, 404 South Carolina, 3, 5, 15, 28, 132, 468 South Fork, 334, 338, 366-67, 433 South Mountain, 135, 139, 152, 161, 254-55-56, 263, 280-81, 367, 385, 392-93-94 South River, 366, 433, 434 Southside R. R., 465 Southwestern Virginia, 331, 378, 381, 397, 416, 429, 453, 466, 469 Sperryville, 238, 285 Spottsylvania, 200, 237, 344, 351-354, 358-360, 374 Springfield, 50 Squires, Lieutenant, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 204, 208 Stafford, Colonel, 142-43, 146-47, 149, 403-04 Stafford Heights, 167, 169, 178, 181, 191, 198, 200, 224 Stansbury Hill, 169, 222-23 Stanton, Secretary of War, 74, 75, 343-44, 392-93, 417 Starke, General, 103, 120-21, 129- 131, 140-42-43 Staunton, 251, 253, 285, 326, 328-29, 331, 340, 359, 368, 369-372, 375, 379, 381-82, 434-35, 457-58, 461,
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States, June, 1863. (search)
, 1863 (Sunday). We got the horse shod with some delay, and after refreshing the animals with corn and ourselves with bacon, we effected a start at 8.15 A. M. We experienced considerable difficulty in carrying my small saddle-bags and knapsack, on account of the state of our horses' backs. Mine was not very bad, but that of Norris was in a horrid state. We had not travelled more than a few miles when the latter animal cast a shoe, which took us an hour to replace at a village called Sperryville. The country is really magnificent, but as it has supported two large armies for two years, it is now completely cleaned out. It is almost uncultivated, and no animals are grazing where there used to be hundreds. All fences have been destroyed, and numberless farms burnt, the chimneys alone left standing. It is difficult to depict and impossible to exaggerate the sufferings which this part of Virginia has undergone. But the ravages of war have not been able to destroy the beauties of
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 46 (search)
ing: I am just informed that Mr. Smithers, telegraph operator at Gordonsville, is again in his office. He says fighting is going oh in sight — that troops from Richmond have arrived, and arriving --and it is expected that Gen. Lomax will be able to drive the enemy back. Just before 3 P. M. to-day a dispatch came from Mr. Smithers, telegraph operator at Gordonsville, dated 1 o'clock, saying the enemy have been repulsed and severely punished, and are retreating the way they came, toward Sperryville. He adds that many of the enemy's dead now lie in sight of the town. So much for this gleam of good fortune, for I believe the military authorities here Were meditating an evacuation of the city. Gen. Custis Lee was at the department to-day, after the clerks detailed from his command. All, all are to be dragged out in this bitter cold weather for defense, except the speculators, the extortioners, the land and slave owners, who really have something tangible to defend, and these hav
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 12: Halleck and Pope in Federal command. (search)
n the armor of the author. General Scott set an example worthy of eternal emulation. In his march through Mexico he was as strict in the requirement of order and protection for non-combatants as he could have been in marching through his own civil communities. The result was speedy peace, respect from all the people, admiration and affection from many. When A. P. Hill's division joined General Jackson at Gordonsville, General Pope's army was posted,--the First Corps (Sigel's) at Sperryville, the Second (Banks's) at Culpeper Court-House, the Third (McDowell's), one division near Culpeper Court-House, and one at Fredericksburg-these two under Ricketts and King respectively; his cavalry under Buford, Bayard, and Hatch along the Rapidan from the Blue Ridge to Fredericksburg. The point held by his left was thought essential by the Washington authorities as holding the way for reinforcements from McClellan's army on the James to join in the contemplated march by General Pope's
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of General Kershaw. (search)
Report of General Kershaw. Headquarters Kershaw's brigade, near Chattanooga, October 1st, 1863. Major: I have the honor to report the operations of my command from the commencement of the march from Culpeper Courthouse until the return of the army to that place. Tuesday, June 16th, the brigade marched to Sperryville; 17th, to Mud run, in Fauquier county. These two days were excessively hot, and on the 17th many cases of sun-stroke occurred. At Gaines' Cross-roads the wagons were sent by the way of Front Royal; Rice's battalion was detached as a guard to the division train; 18th, marched to Piedmont; 19th, to Ashby's Gap, where Rice's battalion rejoined the command; 20th, crossed the Shenandoah river at Berry's Ford; 21st, recrossed and took position in line of battle near Paris to resist a threatened attack of the enemy; 22d, returned to camp on western side of the river; 23d, obtained 503 new arms from Winchester; 24th, marched to Summit Point; 25th, to Martinsburg
entering the valley at Conrad's Store. He burnt the bridge over Pope's Head Run, near Sangster's Station, just out from Alexandria, capturing and dispersing the troops left as a guard. Owing to the high water and bad weather, he was prevented from doing more damage. Gregg's Yankee cavalry pursued, but did not overtake him. General Rosser was forced to swim Bull Run. His loss was very slight, if any. The enemy, while in pursuit, destroyed two tanneries and a lot of leather at Sperryville, Rappahannock County; also, two tanneries, a flour-mill and some government workshops at Luray, in Page County. They also committed many other excesses, including the taking away of negroes, and shot a confederate named Smedley, at Washington, Rappahannock County, after he had surrendered.--Richmond Papers. The rebel privateer Alabama captured the American ships Sonora and Highlander, both lying at anchor at a point about ten miles east of the North Sands light-ship, near Singapore, East-Indie
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