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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 58 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 7 1 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 6 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 6 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 5 5 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 4 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 4 0 Browse Search
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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 47: the March up the Valley. (search)
covered that the enemy was retiring, I moved forward at once and arrived at New Market with my infantry on the 7th. Rosser pushed forward on the Back and Middle roads in pursuit of the enemy's cavalry, which was engaged in burning houses, mills, barns, and stacks of wheat and hay, and had several skirmishes with it, while Lomax also moved down the Valley in pursuit, and skirmished successfully with the enemy's cavalry on the 8th; but on the 9th they encountered his whole cavalry force at Tom's Brook, in rear of Fisher's Hill, and both of their commands were driven back in considerable confusion, with a loss of some pieces of artillery,--nine were reported to me as the number lost, but Grant claims eleven. Rosser rallied his command on the Back Road, at Columbia furnace opposite Edinburg, but a part of the enemy's cavalry swept along the Pike to Mount Jackson, and then retired on the approach of a part of my infantry. On the 10th, Rosser established his line of pickets across the Va
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
olonel, 349, 362 Terrill, Lieutenant Colonel, 194, 250 Terry, Colonel, 62, 72 Terry, Lieutenant, 94 Texas, 468 The Fort, 367 Thoburn, Colonel (U. S. A.), 327 Thomas, Colonel, 99, 124 Thomas, General (U. S. A.), 98, 100, 155, 174, 326, 329-334, 336, 337-38-39, 355-56-57-58, 466, 467 Thornton, Captain, Wm., 187 Thornton, W. W., 4, 47, 50 Thornton's Gap, 284, 285 Thoroughfare Gap, 114, 125 Three Springs, 134 Three Top Mountain, 407 Todd's Tavern, 352 Tom's Brook, 436 Toombs, General, 81 Torbert, General (U. S. A.), 408, 417, 433, 434 Tottopotomoy, 362 Trans-Mississippi Department, 52, 468 Treasury Department, 476 Trimble, General, 78, 79, 82, 106, 115, 119, 120-21, 123, 125, 129, 131, 136, 139, 141, 143, 152, 158, 162, 171, 176, 185, 188, 191, 212, 236 Tunis, Lieutenant, 197, 198 Tunker Church, 403 Trevillian's, 379 Tyler, Colonel, 49 Tyler's Division (U. S. A.), 10, 31, 32, 35, 39, 49 Union Mills, 5, 6, 12, 13, 15, 31, 50 University of Virgi
out to Round Top Mountain to see the fight. When I decided to have Rosser chastised, Merritt was encamped at the foot of Round Top, an elevation just north of Tom's Brook, and Custer some six miles farther north and west, near Tumbling Run. In the night Custer was ordered to retrace his steps before daylight by the Back road, wh engagement soon became general across the valley, both sides fighting mainly mounted. For about two hours the contending lines struggled with each other along Tom's Brook, the charges and counter charges at many points being plainly visible from the summit of Round Top, where I had my headquarters for the time. The open count brigade he was proclaimed as the savior of the Valley, and his men came all bedecked with laurel branches. in that section, baptized the action (known to us as Tom's Brook) the Woodstock races, and never tired of poking fun at General Rosser about his precipitate and inglorious flight. On the 10th my army, resuming its retrogr
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 10.78 (search)
r pushed forward on the back and middle roads in pursuit of the enemy's cavalry, which was engaged in burning houses, mills, barns, and stacks of wheat and hay, and had several skirmishes with it, while Lomax also moved forward on the valley pike and the roads east of it. I halted at New Market with the infantry, but Rosser and Lomax moved down the valley in pursuit, and skirmished successfully with the enemy's cavalry on the 8th; but on the 9th they encountered his whole cavalry force at Tom's Brook, in rear of Fisher's Hill, and both of their commands were driven back in considerable confusion, with a loss of some pieces of artillery; nine were reported to me as the number lost, but Grant claims eleven. Having heard that Sheridan was preparing to send part of his troops to Grant, I moved down the valley again on the 12th. On the morning of the 13th we reached Fisher's Hill, and there remained until the 16th. The enemy was found posted on the north bank of Cedar Creek, in a very
r Trevilian Station St. Mary's Church White House Landing Nottoway Court House Stony Creek Wilson's Raid Ream's Station Staunton Bridge Moorefield Luray White Post Smithfield Berryville Opequon Woodstock Waynesboro New Market Tom's Brook Cedar Creek Hatcher's Run Newtown Rood's Hill Darbytown Road Bellefield Sheridan's Raid Mount Crawford Dinwiddie Court House five Forks Amelia Springs Sailor's Creek Clover Hill Appomattox. This list covers only the more impor864 71 262 1,119 1,452 Deep Bottom, Weldon Railroad, Reams' Station, Petersburg, etc., Va., August 1-30, 1864 64 269 122 455 Chaffin's Farm, Peebles' Farm, etc., Va., Sept. 1-30, 1864 24 121 336 481 Shenandoah campaign, 1864; Opequon, Tom's Brook, Cedar Creek, and 26 other engagements 454 2,817 646 3,917 Fall of Petersburg and Pursuit of Lee, March 29--April 9, 1865 221 930 339 1,490 It will be observed that over one-fourth of these losses are made up of captured, or missing,
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 14: the greatest battles of the war — list of victories and defeats — chronological list of battles with loss in each, Union and Confederate. (search)
ments.Fort Davidson, Mo 28 56 100 184 Sept. 28 Chaffin's Farm, Va 383 2,299 645 3,327 Sept. 30 Known, also, as Peebles's Farm, and Pegram's Farm.Poplar Spring Church, Va 187 900 1,802 2,889 Sept. 1-30 Includes operations on the north side of the James.Petersburg Trenches, Va 74 304 424 802 Oct. 2 Cavalry engagements.Saltville, Va 54 190 104 348 Oct. 5 Allatoona Pass, Ga 142 352 212 706 Oct. 7 Darbytown Road, Va 49 253 156 458 Oct. 9 Cavalry engagements.Tom's Brook; Woodstock, Va 9 67 -- 76 Oct. 13 Cavalry engagements.Strasburg, Va 30 144 40 214 Oct. 13 Darbytown Road, Va 36 358 43 437 Oct. 19 Cedar Creek, Va 644 3,430 1,591 5,665 Oct. 21 Cavalry engagements.Little Blue, Mo 18 83 14 115 Oct. 22 Cavalry engagements.Independence, Mo 14 58 11 83 Oct. 26 Cavalry engagements.Decatur, Ala 10 45 100 155 Oct. 27 Known, also, as Hatcher's Run.Boydton Road, Va 166 1,028 564 1,758 Oct. 27 Darbytown Road; Fair Oaks, V
e unsparing severity of war, his men began to make a barren waste of the region. The October sky was overcast with clouds of smoke and sheets of flame from the burning barns and mills. As the army of Sheridan proceeded down the Valley, the undaunted cavaliers of Early came in pursuit. His horsemen kept close to the rear of the Union columns. On the morning of October 9th, the cavalry leader, Rosser, who had succeeded Wickham, found himself confronted by General Custer's division, at Tom's Brook. At the same time the Federal general, Wesley Merritt, fell upon the cavalry of Lomax and Johnson on an adjacent road. The two Union forces were soon united and a mounted battle ensued. The fight continued for two hours. There were charges and countercharges. The ground being level, the maneuvering of the squadrons was easy. The clink of the sabers rang out in the morning air. Both sides fought with tenacity. The Confederate center held together, but its flanks gave way. The Federal
e unsparing severity of war, his men began to make a barren waste of the region. The October sky was overcast with clouds of smoke and sheets of flame from the burning barns and mills. As the army of Sheridan proceeded down the Valley, the undaunted cavaliers of Early came in pursuit. His horsemen kept close to the rear of the Union columns. On the morning of October 9th, the cavalry leader, Rosser, who had succeeded Wickham, found himself confronted by General Custer's division, at Tom's Brook. At the same time the Federal general, Wesley Merritt, fell upon the cavalry of Lomax and Johnson on an adjacent road. The two Union forces were soon united and a mounted battle ensued. The fight continued for two hours. There were charges and countercharges. The ground being level, the maneuvering of the squadrons was easy. The clink of the sabers rang out in the morning air. Both sides fought with tenacity. The Confederate center held together, but its flanks gave way. The Federal
Pass, Ga. Union, 7th, 12th, 50th, 57th, and 93d Ill., 39th Iowa, 4th Minn., 18th Wis., and 12th Wis. Battery; Confed., Gen. French's command. Losses: Union, 142 killed, 352 wounded, 212 missing; Confed., 127 killed, 456 wounded, 290 missing. October 7-13, 1864: Darbytown Road Va. Union, Tenth Corps and Kautz's Cav.; Confed., troops of Gen. R. E. Lee's command. Losses: Union, 105 killed, 502 wounded, 206 missing; Confed. No record found. October 9, 1864: Tom's Brook, Fisher's Hill or Strasburg, Va. Union, Merritt's, Custer's and Torbert's Cav.; Confed., Rosser's and Lomax's Cav. Losses: Union, 9 killed, 67 wounded; Confed., 100 killed and wounded, 180 missing. October 13, 1864: reconnaissance to Strasburg, Va. Union, Maj.-Gens. Emory's and Crook's troops; Confed., Gen. Early's command. Losses: Union, 30 killed, 144 wounded, 40 missing. October 13, 1864: Dalton, Ga. Union, troops under Col. Johnson, 44th U. S. Color
valley and rose in the smoke from burning barns. Grant had resolved that Shenandoah should no longer be allowed to act as a granary for the armies of the Confederacy. Sheridan and his men had orders ruthlessly to destroy all supplies that could not be carried away. The Confederate cavalry clung desperately to his rear, and gave so much annoyance that on October 8th Sheridan directed Torbert to give Rosser a drubbing next morning or get whipped himself. The saber contest that ensued at Tom's Brook was the last attempt of the Confederate cavalry to reestablish their former supremacy. The sight of the devastated valley spurred the Southern troopers to the most valiant attacks, in spite of their inferior equipment. Again and again were charges made and returned on both sides. For two hours the honors were almost even, the Confederates holding the center, while the Federal cavalry pushed back the flanks. Finally Merritt and Custer ordered a charge along the whole line, and at last
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