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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 71 1 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 70 4 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 66 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 57 1 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 52 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 50 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 48 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 44 4 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 44 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 30, 1861., [Electronic resource] 36 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler. You can also browse the collection for West Point (Virginia, United States) or search for West Point (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 33 results in 8 document sections:

Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 5: Baltimore and Fortress Monroe. (search)
As it was, however, gallant little Delaware remained always loyal and sent sixty odd per cent. of her military population — that is, white men between eighteen and forty-five years of age — to do good service in the Union army. Jefferson Davis could have, and if I had been at his elbow, as he once desired that I should be, would have attended divine service in his own pew in the church at Washington as President of the Confederacy. I know not what prevented him save his education at West Point, where the necessity of a rapid movement in warlike operations is taught in the negative. That sort of instruction, as we shall see as we go on, caused several direful results in the movements of both armies, more especially in the delay in the discharge of the mine at Petersburg, which caused the loss of some thousands of brave soldiers, and in the delays of Early, which lost him Washington in the summer of 1864. Within a few days preceding Sunday, the 5th day of May, I was called to
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 7: recruiting in New England. (search)
State prison birds, and other vagabonds, picked up to fill out enlistments. As I told you, I am a Democrat. Now there are no Democrats as privates or subordinate officers going into the war. There are none going in as officers except they are West Point men, who are made colonels of regiments at once, although in the course of their profession they would have had to work twenty years before they would have obtained that rank. The subordinate officers have gathered up what men they could from y could hold no place in the war as officers, and the cry went out from the copperhead press that this was to be a Republican abolition war, and not a national one. Meanwhile a regiment was raised by Governor Roby in the usual way, and a young West Point lieutenant was appointed colonel. But McClellan took the regiment away from me to Washington, and soon gave the colonel a very considerable promotion. This young man was afterwards captured, together with sixteen horses,--an event which gave
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 9: taking command of a Southern City. (search)
clean just two cases of fever that summer further consideration of yellow fever subject how it was fought at Norfolk and New Berne two years later one thing West Point needs On the morning of the first day of May, having determined to disembark my troops, or as many of them as had then arrived, and take possession of the ciy three years by the Union and rebel troops alternately, commanded by officers who had been taught nothing of sanitary science. This science is not taught at West Point. The want of its proper application to the troops in the field kills more men than are killed by bullets, for it takes nearly a man's weight in lead to be shothe hope that military men and physicians will examine the question. Perhaps if they find that yellow fever can be controlled, someone may get an appointment to West Point as an instructor in a new branch of military science, which instruction may save a great many lives. In aid of this I will give another instance of the break
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 14: in command of the Army of the James. (search)
ble about that. I would undertake to transport thirty thousand men up to Bermuda Hundred and City Point with all their ammunition and supplies in twenty-four hours after I was notified of the march of his army across the Rapidan. By besieging West Point, at the head of York River, and beginning to fortify it, erecting store-houses, as if I was making a base of supplies for my army when it landed to meet the army of the enemy, I could so far hoodwink Lee and his officers that they would believeconcentrated at Yorktown and Gloucester Point, and all the colored infantry and artillery at Hampton, the colored cavalry at Williamsburg, and all the white cavalry at the line beyond Norfolk in the direction of Suffolk. About the 1st of May West Point, at the head of York River, was seized, preparations were made for building wharves and landings, and fortifications were begun, as if with the intention of making this the base of operations for a junction with Grant's army. General Meigs,
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 15: operations of the Army of the James around Richmond and Petersburg. (search)
d of several thousand men, and had been moving large bodies of troops from Boston to Annapolis, from Annapolis to Washington, from the capital to the Relay House, and from the Relay House to Baltimore; and had afterwards moved troops from Boston to Ship Island, and from Ship Island to New Orleans, and from New Orleans all over the State of Louisiana, it seemed to me that I had had much more experience in moving troops than he had; and as a topographical engineer is not the highest grade at West Point, I did not think I should be insulted by a second grade West Pointer. I overlooked all that, however, and wrote him an unofficial letter explaining my first letter, asking him if he did not regret sending me such a reply. See Appendix No. 74. By the regulations of the service all communications in regard to military matters are to be forwarded to the superior officer through the officer in the next highest grade, and if this is not done it may be inquired into by a court-martial. Ye
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 16: capture of fortifications around Richmond, Newmarket Heights, Dutch Gap Canal, elections in New York and gold conspiracy. (search)
the best way would be, and in that General Barnard agreed with me, to commence by placing a coffer-dam at the lower end of the canal, and then to cut the excavation wide and deep enough up to within twenty-five or thirty feet of the river on the other side, and let the bank at the upper cut stand as a shield against the enemy's direct fire. The work proceeded according to this plan, under the direction of my skilled engineer, Maj. Peter S. Michie, now one of the board of instructors of West Point Military Academy, than whom I know of no better or more efficient engineer. It was pursued with great diligence and success. Once it was finished we could hold the James River up to Fort Darling with our fleet, if the naval forces of the United States were able to compete with the enemy's fleet above, which we assumed they were able to do. And when at Fort Darling we should be in condition to make an attack upon Richmond itself, which would lie almost under our guns, for we would be insi
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 18: why I was relieved from command. (search)
e mind of Grant. The pressure came from his West Point staff officers, who were trying in every wayn my staff and served well — an education at West Point brought the ambition of its pupils. It was be fit to command troops who had not been to West Point. I never had been there except to examine tat sort of education does the student get at West Point which enables him to perform the greatest acake as a sample of the education acquired at West Point, that which enabled one West Pointer to outsto barracks — I felt as though I had been at West Point always, and that if I stayed to graduation, :-- Grant evidently did not get enough of West Point into him to hurt him any; he was less like aitary education I lost in not having gone to West Point to get a military education like that of Grant. The less of West Point a man has the more successful he will be. We see how little Grant had. Aw little the young student was interested at West Point, in those studies which pertained to the art[7 more...]<
or government lands collected at, 844; Butler at, 863; Butler gives dinner to West Point officers, 864-865; the alleged irregularities at, 871; Shepley takes charge oth Badeau, 857, 859, 860; tribute to Butler, 862; in New York Herald, 863; on West Point in Personal Memoirs, 866-867; indifference to military matters, 867-868; in Mpping, Nicholas, teacher, anecdote of, 56. Howard, Gen. O. O., graduate of West Point, 58. Howe, Elias, reference to, 1007. Hudson Bay Company, 1001. Hudsonel, 172, 268, 270, 275, 292. Pierce, President, appoints Butler visitor at West Point, 127; makes Davis Secretary of War, 140; persuades law partner not to enlist,negotiations with Johnston, 876; named for major general 877-878; quoted upon West Point, 890; terms of surrender between Johnston, 910-912; his obstinacy, 913; reasovis' trial, 918; reference to, 966; in the Farragut prize case, 1010-1012. West Point, Butler desires to enter, 57; sends son to, 80; grandson at, 81; appointed vi