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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 46 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 44 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 16 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 12 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 8 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 8 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Meadow Bridge (West Virginia, United States) or search for Meadow Bridge (West Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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en ordered up from the South. When all things were ripe, Jackson moved, by order, rapidly and secretly from tie Valley to Ashland, facing our extreme right, whence he was directed to advance June 25. so as to flank our right, holding Mechanicsville. Moving on at 3 next morning, June 26. he was directed to connect With Gen. Branch, immediately south of the Chickahominy, who was to cross that stream and advance on Mechanicsville; while Gen. A. P. Hill, lower down, was to cross near Meadow Bridge so soon as Branch's movement was discovered, and move directly upon Mechanicsville, where on the Rebel batteries on the southern bluffs of the Chickahominy were to open; Longostreet's division following in support of Hill, while D. H. Hill's in like manner supported Jackson; thus only Huger's and Magruder's divisions were left in front of our left and center, immediately before Richmond. Jackson was unable to reach Ashland quite so soon as had been anticipated ; so that A. P. Hill did
ine and 10th New York, was impelled eastward, to destroy the railroad bridge on the Fredericksburg road at Ashland; but proved unequal to the task, and contented himself with burning two or three turnpike bridges; falling back upon Stoneman. Col. Judson Kilpatrick was sent, with the Harris Light, to cut the railroads leading northwarda from Richmond still nearer that city, and struck May 4. the Fredericksburg road at Hungary, cut it, pressing thence to the Virginia Central road, near Meadow Bridge, doing there a little mischief; and thence pushing north-eastward across the Pamunkey near Hanover, and the Mattapony at Aylett's, to King and Queen Court House, and thence south-eastwardly to our lines May 47 at Gloucester Point, on York river. Lt.-Col. B. F. Davis, 12th Illinois, had meantime passed May 3. down the South Anna to Ashland, where he tore up some rails and captured a train of sick, whom he paroled, and crossed thence to Hanover Station on the Central, which was fract
cavalry at Yellow Tavern, a few miles north of Richmond, where he proposed to stop the raid. A spirited fight ensued, wherein Stuart was mortally wounded (as was Brig.-Gen. J. B. Gordon) and his force driven off the turnpike toward Ashland, leaving the road to Richmond open. Sheridan pressed down it; Custer carrying the outer line of defenses and taking 100 prisoners. But Richmond was no longer to be taken on a gallop, and our assault was repulsed; Sheridan crossing the Chickahominy at Meadow bridge, beating off attacks both front and rear, burning the railroad bridge, and moving to Haxall's; May 14. where he rested three days, and then, moving by White House and Hanover C. H., rejoined the Army of the Potomac. Gen. Butler, commanding at Fortress Monroe, had been reinforced in pursuance of a programme suggested by him and concurred in by Gen. Grant: Gen. W. F. Smith's (18th) corps and Gen. Gillmore's (10th) corps (from South Carolina) having been sent him, raising our effect
some 6,000 men, had made directly for the Virginia and Tennessee railroad at Dublin station; 4 miles from which he was met by a far inferior Rebel force under McCausland, which fought bravely, but was beaten off, with a loss on our part of 126 killed and 585 wounded. The railroad here, and for a short distance eastward, was destroyed. And now the appearance of a considerable Rebel reenforcement, dispatched from Wytheville by Morgan before he fought Averill, impelled Crook to retreat to Meadow bridge; so that, when Averill reached Dublin, Crook was gone, which left him no choice but to follow. Thus the concentric movement upon Lee's flank and rear resulted, as usual with such combinations, in general failure, if not positive disaster. A force that, if concentrated, could have beaten all the Rebels in Virginia west of the Blue ridge, had been so dispersed and frittered away as to achieve less than nothing. Grant at once relieved Sigel, sending Gen. Hunter to succeed him. The old,