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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
tried men's souls and made heroes in an hour's time. His battle was short but glorious. But for my positive and persistent insistence, this record of his valor never would have been known outside of the circle of his immediate friends, and it is with the greatest pleasure I chronicle these facts: W. W. George was second lieutenant in Company H, Twenty-sixth (Edgar's) Battalion, Echols' Brigade, Breckinridge's Division. This command arrived at Cold Harbor from Monroe Draft (now Ronceverte, West Va.) They had been on the road one month and three days and had fought Sigel at New Market, May 15th. From there they went to Staunton, and thence by train to Hanover Junction, and joined Lee's immortals. Hard fighting commenced at once and continued all along the line to the Patawet river. We fell back from this point to Cold Harbor (June 2d) and relieved General Lomax's division of cavalry. General Grant had consolidated his forces at and around this position, and Lee had gathered
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.26 (search)
tried men's souls and made heroes in an hour's time. His battle was short but glorious. But for my positive and persistent insistence, this record of his valor never would have been known outside of the circle of his immediate friends, and it is with the greatest pleasure I chronicle these facts: W. W. George was second lieutenant in Company H, Twenty-sixth (Edgar's) Battalion, Echols' Brigade, Breckinridge's Division. This command arrived at Cold Harbor from Monroe Draft (now Ronceverte, West Va.) They had been on the road one month and three days and had fought Sigel at New Market, May 15th. From there they went to Staunton, and thence by train to Hanover Junction, and joined Lee's immortals. Hard fighting commenced at once and continued all along the line to the Patawet river. We fell back from this point to Cold Harbor (June 2d) and relieved General Lomax's division of cavalry. General Grant had consolidated his forces at and around this position, and Lee had gathered
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Roster of Company E, Nineteenth Virginia Infantry. (search)
Roster of Company E, Nineteenth Virginia Infantry. Brief story of war life. Headquarters Goss-Grigsby Camp, No. 93, Confederate Veterans, Stony Point, Va. Editor of The Times-Dispatch: Sir,—I send to your Confederate column muster roll of officers and men of E Company, 19th Virginia Regiment. In March, 1902, Colonel Charles S. Peyton, now of Ronceverte, W. Va., who assisted in the organization of the company, and was its first captain, whilst on a visit to his old home, Stony Point, Va., with the assistance of the late John W. Goss, and myself commenced this work. When Colonel Peyton returned to West Virginia he requested me to complete the roll. Now, after many unavoidable hinderances, I hand you an official war record of the company, for not a name, not a remark by memory. The roll is verified by first sergeants' books, now in possession of the families of descendants of these officers, and of four muster rolls of the company in my possession. There may be some
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.30 (search)
Men who marched and fought well. From the times-dispatch, May 20, 1906. List of officers and Roster of Company E, Nineteenth Virginia Infantry. Headquarters Gross-Grigsby Camp, No. 93, Confederate Veterans, Stony Point, Va. Editor of The Times-Dispatch: Sir,—I send to your Confederate column muster roll of officers and men of E Company, Nineteenth Virginia Regiment. In March, 1902, Colonel Charles S. Peyton, now of Ronceverte, W. Va., who assisted in the organization of the company, and was its first captain, whilst on a visit to his old home, Stony Point, Va., with the assistance of the late John W. Goss, and myself, commenced this work. When Colonel Peyton returned to West Virginia he requested me to complete the roll. Now after many unavoidable hinderances, I hand you an official war record of the company, for not a name, not a remark by memory. The roll is verified by first sergeant's books, now in possession of the families of descendants of these officers,