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m 24 Nov. 1741 to 14 July 1774, when he resigned on account of his advanced age. He inherited the homestead on the westerly side of the Common: he also purchased in 1729 a large part of the Holden Farm, bounded south on Fresh Pond and east on Alewife Brook, being the former southeasterly corner of Arlington. He retained possession of both estates through life; but what proportion of the time he resided on each, has not been ascertained. When the War of the Revolution commenced, and Camb. bec7; Mary, bap. 22 Ap. 1739, d. young; Philemon, b. 1 Aug. 1740; Mary, b. 20 May 1743, d. unm. 16 Oct. 1762. Joseph the f. was a farmer and res. on the northerly side of the main road in Menot., on the first estate westerly from the river, or Alewife Brook, until the spring of 1730, when he exchanged estates with Capt. Samuel Whittemore, and removed into the westerly border of Chs. (now Somerville) on the road leading to Winter Hill. He d. 13 Nov. 1776, a. 73, and was buried at West Cambridge,
grad. H. C. 1756, a merchant in Berwick, Me., m. Mehetabel Spencer, and d. here 29 July 1769; Sarah, bap. 25 Jan. 1740-41, m. Charles Hill of Berwick 15 Sept. 1757. Henry the f. was a husbandman and brickmaker; Deacon of Dr. Appleton's Church from 24 Nov. 1741 to 14 July 1774, when he resigned on account of his advanced age. He inherited the homestead on the westerly side of the Common: he also purchased in 1729 a large part of the Holden Farm, bounded south on Fresh Pond and east on Alewife Brook, being the former southeasterly corner of Arlington. He retained possession of both estates through life; but what proportion of the time he resided on each, has not been ascertained. When the War of the Revolution commenced, and Camb. became the headquarters of the Continental Army, Deac. Prentice retired to the house of his son, Rev. Joshua Prentice of Holliston, where he d. 18 Oct. 1778, a. 84; his w. Elizabeth d. 7 Ap. 1775, a. 78. 14. John, s. of Henry (8), m. Mary Smith 5 Ja
1 June 1729). 18. Joseph, s. of Walter (9), m. Mary Robbins 9 Oct. 1724, and had Mary, b. 9 Mar. 1726-7; Lucy, bap. 16 Mar. 1728-9, d. young; Lucy, bap. 17 Jan. 1730-31; Patten, bap. 28 Jan. 1732-3; Joseph, bap. 9 Mar. 1734-5; Walter, b. about 1737; Mary, bap. 22 Ap. 1739, d. young; Philemon, b. 1 Aug. 1740; Mary, b. 20 May 1743, d. unm. 16 Oct. 1762. Joseph the f. was a farmer and res. on the northerly side of the main road in Menot., on the first estate westerly from the river, or Alewife Brook, until the spring of 1730, when he exchanged estates with Capt. Samuel Whittemore, and removed into the westerly border of Chs. (now Somerville) on the road leading to Winter Hill. He d. 13 Nov. 1776, a. 73, and was buried at West Cambridge, as were most of the Russell family of Menot., whether residing on the Camb. or Chs. side of the line; his w. Mary d. 28 Dec. 1781, a. 80. 19. Jeremiah, s. of Walter (9), m.——, and had Seth, b. 1732, bap. 31 Mar. 1734; Edward, bap. 10 Nov. 1734.
shire street, and from which the lane was named. On September 6, 1631, Winthrop was granted 600 acres of land on the south side of Mystic river, which he named Ten Hills. In 1632 he was granted Conant's Island, in Boston harbor, and changed its name to Governor's Garden, he planting orchards, fruit, and vines there. It is now Governor's Island, the site of Fort Winthrop. In November, 1632, he received a further grant of fifty acres of land near Wannottymies river, which is now Alewife brook, and in 1634 he was with Craddock granted the fish weir on the Mystic, at Medford, and again another grant of 1,000 acres or more on Concord river. Winthrop seems to have temporarily resided in Cambridge in 1632. He probably resided at Ten Hills summers, and at Boston winters, maintaining an establishment at Ten Hills the year round. The original Ten Hills farm, as granted by the general court to Winthrop in 1631, comprised all the land south of Mystic river, from Broadway park to
Index Abbie, Aunt (Tufts), 41. Abbott, Mrs., Hull, 45. Abbott, Rev. Mr., Hull, 45. Adams, Anna, 89. Adams, Anne, 89. Adams, Charles, 40. Adams, Chester, 22. Adams, Hannah, 89. Adams, Harriet A., 22. Adams, President, John, 18. Adams, Joseph, 22, 40, 69, 89, 92, 93. Adams, Martha, 92. Adams, Mary, 89. Adams, Nathan, 69. Adams, Rebecca, 89. Adams, Samuel, 40. Adams, Thomas, 89. Aldersey Street, Somerville, 71. Alewife Brook, 31. Alewife Brook District, 15, 87. Alewife Meadow, 54. Allerdale, Lords of, 49. Allerdale Ward, 49 Ames, Governor, Oliver, 31. Anderson, Mistress, Rebecca, 18. Andover, Mass., 68. Andros, Governor, 31. Ann Street, Boston, 4. Arbella, The, 29. Arlington, Mass., 15, 38, 56, 74, 87. Ash Street, Boston, 51. Austin Street, Somerville, 3. Baldwin, George Rumford, 3. Baldwin, Loammi, 2, 3. Barrett, Samuel, Jr., 11. Bartlett, Hon., Josiah, M. D., 48. Bell Rock, Malden, 58. Big Bethel, 35. Billerica, Mass
hes extended along the Mystic river, from the Medford line to Charlestown Neck, the marsh grasses green and beautiful in their pristine freshness. On the south, Miller's river, or Willis creek, as it was first called, a broad inlet from the sea, reached beyond Union square, probably as far as where the bleachery now stands; and from there to Charlestown Neck was another extent of salt marsh. And again on the west was a narrower strip of land that felt the influence of salt water where Alewife brook divides Somerville from Cambridge and Arlington. Numerous brooks flowed through valleys between the many hills, watering large meadows, without any tree or shrub to hinder the scythe. The hills of Somerville are drumlins, and were doubtless covered with the hardwood trees that thrive best on such dry, glacial soil—oak, chestnut, maple, beech, and birch. The little valleys and the swamps, the tracts of sand and clay offered conditions favorable to the growth of many different kinds o
ge of slate-stone. All the common ferns grew along the brook at the foot of the banking, but the real treasures were found in the crevices of the ledge above. Rand's woods, already mentioned, always repaid us for a visit, the low cornel and the lady's slipper being the choicest flowers growing here. But the rear of Mr. Holland's farm, back of where the elevated railroad car houses now stand, furnished us with more interesting specimens than any other spot in West Somerville. Here Alewife brook separated the farm from Cambridge, and in the spring were found many water-loving plants, among others, the pitcher plant, that most curious of all New England wild flowers; the marsh marigold, the arrowhead, the forget-me-not, and the buck bean, perhaps the choicest and most beautiful wild flower then growing in Somerville, in spite of its commonplace name; and Colonel Higginson doubtless thought he lavished high praise on this dainty flower when he said it possessed a certain garden-li
Historic leaves, volume 4, April, 1905 - January, 1906, Charlestown schools without the Peninsula Revolutionary period. (search)
y, 1787, the selectmen, Seth Wyman, William Whittemore (same amount). May 26, 1788, the selectmen, Philemon Russell, Seth Wyman; £ 150 (for all schools). May 14, 1789, the selectmen, Philemon Russell (same amount); Milk Row, £ 31 2s 8d; Alewife Brook, £ 14 17s 2d; Gardner Row, £ 14 18s 10d. May, 1790, ‘91, same committee; £ 150, exclusive of the income of the school fund. May 14, 1792, the selectmen, Richard Devens, Samuel Dexter, Philemon Russell, Seth Wyman; £ 225, including the sh Wyman; £ 150 (for all schools). May 14, 1789, the selectmen, Philemon Russell (same amount); Milk Row, £ 31 2s 8d; Alewife Brook, £ 14 17s 2d; Gardner Row, £ 14 18s 10d. May, 1790, ‘91, same committee; £ 150, exclusive of the income of the school fund. May 14, 1792, the selectmen, Richard Devens, Samuel Dexter, Philemon Russell, Seth Wyman; £ 225, including the school fund. Apportioned February, 1793, for the year preceding, Milk Row, £ 41; Alewife Brook, £ 20; G
Historic leaves, volume 6, April, 1907 - January, 1908, Original English inhabitants and early settlers in Somerville. (search)
omprised a large part of Somerville. Gibbons-field, the South-mead and the West End were south of the Road to Cambridge, and westerly of what is now the Southern division of the Boston and Maine Railroad. Strawberry Hill was probably the same as our Prospect Hill. Lastly, there can hardly be a doubt that a part of what was called the Line-field of Charlestown was between the Stinted Pasture and the Newtown, or Cambridge, town line; from what is now Cambridgeport to Menotomy River, now Alewife Brook; the Line-field extending, also, into what is now the town of Arlington to, Mystic Pond. All these local names are now obsolete except that a part of the original Ten Hills Farms within our limits is still known as such. A century or more ago the Highfield became Ploughed Hill, and over two centuries ago the Highfield-mead became Dirty-marsh; but these names are now extinct, and there seems to be no modern names except for Strawberry Hill for the other localities of the olden time.
Historic leaves, volume 6, April, 1907 - January, 1908, Original English inhabitants and early settlers in Somerville.—(Ii.) (search)
and lived on Prospect Hill. If he has descendants in this city, they are unknown to me. Lydia Cutter, sister of Ephraim, married Jonathan Teele, of Somerville. Rebecca Cutter, daughter of William, was of the third generation, and married Joseph Adams (the second Joseph), of Cambridge. The descendants of Richard Cutter now living in this city are seventy-four in all. Philemon Russell, probably in 1789, as he was in the census of that year. His possessions in Somerville were near Alewife Brook. He was son of Joseph, who may have lived in the same locality, and who was of the fourth generation of the William Russell family of Cambridge. Philemon Russell married Elizabeth, daughter of David Wyman. His eldest son, Philemon Robbins, married Martha, daughter of Isaac Tufts, a member of the ubiquitous Tufts family. The descendants of William Russell now living in this city, all through Philemon R. and wife Martha, are sixteen in number. Nathaniel Hawkins, 1783, married, first
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