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Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 8 0 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 8 0 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 4 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 2 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
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ple of the frontier — a state of affairs very rare indeed. He was keenly alive to the duty intrusted to him — the defense of the frontier. It was a subject that had engaged his interest and sympathy for twenty years, and the field of operations was perfectly familiar to him. His command was a force more suitable for service than had formerly been employed, and his orders were carried out by as able and enterprising a body of officers and men as has ever been collected into one regiment in America. Enjoying, too, very fully, the confidence of the people, he received that justice at their hands which is not always accorded to commanders, even when deserving. When General Johnston reached Fort Mason, the border was full of terror. The year 1855 had been one of unusual disaster and suffering. The Indians had murdered and pillaged as far down as the Blanco, within twenty miles of Austin, and even below San Antonio, in September. The arrival of the Second Cavalry changed the aspe
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Sketch of the principal maritime expeditions. (search)
d place, thus to speak, at the same instant when the discovery of the mariner's compass, of the Cape of Good Hope and of America, were about to change also all the combinations of maritime commerce, and create an absolutely new colonial system. We shall not speak here of the Spanish expeditions to America, nor of those of the Portuguese, of the Hollanders and of the English in India, by doubling the Cape of Good Hope. In spite of their great influence upon the commerce of the world, in spiaritime efforts of France; Europe did not see, without astonishment, that power send at the same time Count D'Estaing to America with twenty-five ves sels of the line, whilst that M. Orvilliers, with sixty-five Franco-Spanish vessels of the line, waivision, contributed in investing the small army of Cornwallis in New York (1781) and in fixing thus the independence of America. France would have triumphed perhaps forever over her implacable rival, if, by the aid of those parades in La Mariche,
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 1.4, chapter 1.8 (search)
severe thraldom, and elevated to the rank of man. Messrs. Kennicy and Richardson were good types of free-spoken young America. They were both touchy in the extreme, and, on points of personal honour, highly intolerant. America breeds such peoplthe street; and the packetship was furnished with rope's ends and belaying-pins. But, within a few weeks of arriving in America, I had become different in temper and spirit. That which was natural in me, though so long repressed, had sprung out vepen in my cousin's study at Brynford. Through the influence of cheap copies of standard books, millions of readers in America have been educated, at slight cost, in the best productions of English authors; and when these have been delegated to th of the genial welcome they had met with from their foreign friends. The stories of their sea-life, and the pictures of America which they gave, fascinated her; and she secretly resolved that, upon the first violent outbreak of her grandmother's te
time in motion by the hands of the workmen. Sometimes they are thrown upon a table to be rolled a second time. This completes the chief part of the operation, though afterward, when a considerable quantity has thus been finished, it goes through a farther process of winnowing and sifting to separate impurities, and assorting into different varieties, and reheating also, to be sure that the drying is complete. Teas for home consumption are never colored. Those for export to Europe and America are made more pleasing to the eye, if not to the palate, by the addition of Prussian blue, China clay, turmeric, and a white powder usually composed of kaolin, soapstone, or sulphate of lime. Black-lead and indigo are also employed for coloring and glazing. Rice or paddy husks mixed with fragments of the tea-leaf, and tea-dust mixed with sand and rice-water, known as Lie tea, are other factitious products designed to cheer but not inebriate the outside barbarian. The mate, or Paraguaya
a petition to revoke my orders removing all the inhabitants from Atlanta. I have read it carefully, and give full credit to your statements of the distress that will be occasioned by it, and yet shall not revoke my order, simply because my orders are not designed to meet the humanities of the case, but to prepare for the future struggles in which millions, yea hundreds of millions, of good people outside of Atlanta have a deep interest. We must have Peace, not only in Atlanta, but in all America. To secure this we must stop the war that now desolates our once happy and favored country. To stop war, we must defeat the rebel armies that are arrayed against the laws and Constitution, which all must respect and obey. To defeat these armies we must prepare the way to reach them in their recesses, provided with the arms and instruments which enable us to accomplish our purpose. Now, I know the vindictive nature of our enemy, and that we may have years of military operations from thi
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1, Chapter 23: Communism. (search)
ttempt was made so long ago as the reign of Edward the Third. After trial of the system for a single year, the theory was rejected and the law repealed. Among the higher races of mankind the rule has been put down. A touch of the old savagery lingers on the frontiers of civilisation. France finds a remnant of this rule in Corsica, Spain in Biscay, England in Connaught, America in the prairies-each nation on the spot where remnants of her ancient races yet survive. Every observer in America notices the prevalence of communistic sentiment — a readiness to put the country before the commonwealth, and to replace public justice by private murder. This disposition shews itself in secret leagues-Danite Bands, Ku Klux Klans, Camelia Circles — no less than in the prevalence of Vigilance Committees, and the operations of Judge Lynch. A farmer named Vancil lives near De Soto, a town on Big Muddy River, in the southern part of Illinois. Old and feeble, this farmer has a quarrel with
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1, Chapter 27: a Zambo village. (search)
s in the fields and nearly all these shanties in the town being tenanted by the new race of mixed bloods known to science as Zambos — the offspring of Negro bucks and Indian .squaws. According to Tschudi's List of Half-castes, a White father and a Negro mother produce a Mulatto; a White father and an Indian mother produce a Mestizo; an Indian father and a Negro mother produce a Chino; a Negro father and an Indian mother produce a Zambo. These four hybrids are the primary mixed breeds of America. A Mulatto is coffee-coloured; a Mestizo is ruddygold; a Chino is dirty-red; a Zambo is dirtybrown. A White father and Mulatta mother produce the Quadroon; a White father and Mestiza mother the Creole. Quadroons and Creoles, though dark and coarse, are sometimes beautiful, and in a state of servitude young females of these families always fetched more money than a Turkish pasha gave for his Georgian slave. A Negro father and Mulatta mother produce a Cubra, and a Cubra is an ugly mo
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Chapter 19: personal traits. (search)
lf emphatic without the aid of underscoring; indeed she abstains from this to an extent which would quite amaze Mr. Howells. To be sure, she was not at all one of those charming, helpless, inconsequent creatures whom he so exquisitely depicts; she demanded a great deal from life, but generally knew what she wanted, stated it effectively, and at last obtained it. It was indeed fortunate for her younger brothers and sisters that she was of this constitution. She lived at a time when life in America was hard for all literary people, from the absence of remuneration, the small supply of books, the habit of jealousy among authors, and the lingering prevalence of the colonial spirit, which she battled stoutly to banish. It was especially hard for women in that profession because there were few of them, their early education was won at great disadvantage, and much was conceded reluctantly that now comes as a matter of course. Were she living to-day her life would be far smoother; she wo
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Eighth: the war of the Rebellion. (search)
piness for all. No such treasure had before been committed to men. When He spread this festival, He asked all nations to come. Hardly a day went by, but some winged messenger came from the Old World, freighted with hearts that were weary, seeking a new roof-tree,—with muscles that were over-strained by the unpaid toil of Europe; but all ready to carry out the dreams of personal, manly, ennobling social life. The best minds and the warmest hearts on the other side of the water understood America. They knew our history, and they burned with enthusiasm to mix their fortunes up with our earlier settlers. They did; and even this tide of national disaster hardly arrested their corning. They were arriving still; and they found fertile soil and free institutions for their free possession, till at last all Europe and Asia will together rejoice in the triumph of the thoughts and desires of the brave and humane men who constructed our system of civic life. IV. And thus we went o
e race freedom, order, and happiness for all. No such treasure had before been committed to men. When He spread this festival, He asked all nations to come. Hardly a day went by, but some winged messenger came from the Old World, freighted with hearts that were weary, seeking a new roof-tree,—with muscles that were over-strained by the unpaid toil of Europe; but all ready to carry out the dreams of personal, manly, ennobling social life. The best minds and the warmest hearts on the other side of the water understood America. They knew our history, and they burned with enthusiasm to mix their fortunes up with our earlier settlers. They did; and even this tide of national disaster hardly arrested their corning. They were arriving still; and they found fertile soil and free institutions for their free possession, till at last all Europe and Asia will together rejoice in the triumph of the thoughts and desires of the brave and humane men who constructed our system of civic life
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