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Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.) 2 0 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 2 0 Browse Search
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Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.), Scroll 12, line 2 (search)
terrific fury; the blessed gods call these rocks the Wanderers. Here not even a bird may pass, no, not even the timid doves that bring ambrosia to Father Zeus, but the sheer rock always carries off one of them, and Father Zeus has to send another to make up their number; no ship that ever yet came to these rocks has got away again, but the waves and whirlwinds of fire are freighted with wreckage and with the bodies of dead men. The only vessel that ever sailed and got through, was the famous Argo on her way from the house of Aietes, and she too would have gone against these great rocks, only that Hera piloted her past them for the love she bore to Jason. "‘Of these two rocks the one reaches heaven and its peak is lost in a dark cloud. This never leaves it, so that the top is never clear not even in summer and early autumn. No man though he had twenty hands and twenty feet could get a foothold on it and climb it, for it runs sheer up, as smooth as though it had been polished. In the m
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill), Poem 64 (search)
Athon . Phasidos: the chief river of Colchis, rising in the Caucasus and flowing into the Euxine Sea at its eastern end. Aceteos: Gr. *ai)htei/ous: Aeetes was king of Colchis and father of Medea. lecti iuuenes: so the Argonauts are called by Ennius Med. Exsul 209 R. Argivi delecti viri ) and Verg. Ecl. 4.34 altera quae vehat Argo delectos heroas ); cf. also Theocr. 13.18 pasa=n e)k poli/wn prolelegme/noi (of the Argonauts). auratam pellem: for the story of the Argonautic expedition see Hom. Od. 12.69; Hes. Theog. 992; Apollod. 1.9.16ff; and the poems by Pind. Pyth. 4.1ff., Apollonius, and Valerius Flaccus. avertere: to win; especially used of plunder; cf. Caes. BC 3.59.4