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n it matters little, we repeat, whether Mr. Lincoln or General McClellan exercises powers which are beyond the strict letter of the Constitution. It still appears to be doubtful whether the Confederate troops, flushed with success, intend to attack Washington. As their object will be accomplished by clearing the secessionist States of Federal troops, sound policy would seem to dictate that the enemy should be quietly left to improve their organization in the comparative security of Arlington Heights. Actual warfare in the United States has now been waged for several months. Every advantage, with the exception of General McClellan's successes in Western Virginia, has been on the side of the South. What has the North gained in exchange? A disgraceful defeat, an amount of taxation which is unparalleled in the history of European nations, the utter subversion of constitutional liberty, and, by means of prohibitory tariffs, the alienation of the sympathies of their best customers a
on that day, as one of the finest in the whole season — warm, but clear and delightfully pleasant. During the morning, our little party secured the necessary passes to carry them across the river, and at three P. M. we reached the base of Arlington Heights, on horseback, this being voted the best mode of conveyance. We were fortunately well mounted, our animals were fresh, and we passed an hour or two moving around among the camps, where all was bustle and stir preparatory to joining the marted within the breastworks vacated only an hour or two before by the rebels. Operations of the right wing. Vienna, Va., July 16, 1861. The long-expected order to move forward was telegraphed from Gen. McDowell's headquarters, at Arlington Heights, to all the division and brigade commanders of the grand army at two o'clock yesterday afternoon, and was communicated to the different corps during the brigade parades held in the course of the evening. The order was received by all the t
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New York Volunteers. (search)
d's Command. Mustered in May 2, 1861. Advance into Virginia May 23. Occupation of Arlington Heights, Va., May 24. Ordered to join Patterson's Army July 6. Skirmish near Martinsburg July 1's Command, Dept. of Washington, D. C. Advance into Virginia May 23. Occupation of Arlington Heights, Va., May 24. Engaged in fatigue duty at Arlington Heights building, Fort Albany, till Juld exchanged November 22, 1862. Moved to Washington, D. C., November 23-25. Camp at Arlington Heights, Va., till December 3, and at Centreville, Va., till June, 1863. Ordered to join Army of td exchanged November 22, 1862. Moved to Washington, D. C., November 23-25. Camp at Arlington Heights, Va., Defenses of Washington, to December 3, 1862, and at Centreville, Va., till June, 1863. 864. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 5th Army Corps, to June, 1865. Service. Camp at Arlington Heights, Va., till September 23, 1862. Duty at Bolivar Heights till November. Battle of Frederi
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Rhode Island Volunteers. (search)
n, Military District of Washington, to October, 1862. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 9th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to April, 1863; Dept. Ohio to June, 1863, and Army of the Tennessee to September, 1863. District of North Central Kentucky, 1st Division, 23rd Army Corps, Dept. Ohio, to April, 1864. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 9th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to July, 1865. Service. Camp at Capital Hill, Defenses of Washington, D. C., till September 16, 1862, and at Arlington Heights, Va., till October 1. Moved to Sandy Hook, Md., October 1. Movement to Falmouth, Va., October 27-November 19. Warrenton, Sulphur Springs, November 15. Battle of Fredericksburg December 12-15. Mud March January 20-24, 1863. Moved to Newport News February 9, thence to Lexington, Ky., March 25-31. Moved to Winchester, thence to Richmond, Ky., April 18. To Paint Creek May 3, and to Lancaster May 10. Moved to Vicksburg, Miss., June 4-14. Siege of Vicksburg June 15
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, United States--Regular Army. (search)
ansura, May 16. At Morganza till June. Expedition from Morganza to the Atchafalaya May 30-June 5. Moved to New Orleans, thence to New York July 27-August 3, and to Washington, D. C., August 5. Duty in the Defenses of that city till October, 1865. Moved to Fort Trumball, Conn. Battery G 1st United States Artillery Stationed at Fort Pickens, Florida, January to May, 1861. Moved to Fort Hamilton, N. Y. Harbor, May 13-26, thence to Washington, D. C., July 8. At Arlington Heights, Va., till July 16. Attached to Richardson's Brigade, Tyler's Division, McDowell's Army Northeast Virginia, to August, 1861. Richardson's Brigade, Division Potomac, to October, 1861. Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac (temporarily attached to Batteries E and K, 1st Artillery February, 1862), to May, 1862. 2nd Brigade, Artillery Reserve, 5th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to September, 1862. Artillery, 2nd Division, 5th Army Corps, to October, 1862. Artillery, 3rd D
Pittsburg, Pa. , V., 137. Fort Powell, Ala.: VI., 250, 256, 320, 322. Fort Powhatan, Va., V., 306. Fort Pulaski, Ga.: I., 360, 361; III., 229; V., 110; parapets after the capture, V., 147, 255, 259, 261; VI., 237, 313: VII., 165; VIII., 229. Fort Putnam. S. C. V., 179. Fort Randolph, Tenn., I., 236, 240, 249. Fort Reno, D. C., V., 94. Fort Rice, Va., III., 207. Fort Richardson, near Savage Station, Va. , L., 301. Fort Richardson, Arlington Heights, Va. , III., 153; V., 78, 79. Fort Ridgly, Minn., VIII., 79. Fort Ripley, S. C., VIII., 79. Fort Royal, Va., IX., 87. Fort Runyon, Va.: V., 76, 90, 98; N. Y. Seventh assists in building, VIII., 67. Fort St. Philip, La.: the capture of, I., 226; surrender of, I., 234, 362; VI., 119, 187, 189, 194, 198, 201, 216, 314. Fort Sanders, Tenn., II., 338, 339. Fort Sawyer, Va., I., 119. Fort Scott, D. C., V., 94. Fort Scott, Kan., V., 180.
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 28., Medford and her Minute Men, April 19, 1775. (search)
attle Captain Hall of Medford, fifty-nine men; Captain Blaney of Malden, seventy-five men; Captain Bancroft of Lynn, thirty-eight men; and eight companies of Danvers men, totaling three hundred and thirty-one men. It thus appears that these companies, among others, may have been definitely held at Menotomy, or in the uncertainty that attended the direction of the unorganized American forces, that they awaited the developments of the day at this point. At the base of Pierce's hill, now Arlington heights, the battle raged along the highway to Arlington center. Between the house of Jason Russell, still standing on Jason street, and the center of the village, the fighting reached its climax. Altogether in Arlington on that afternoon twenty-five Provincials fell or were mortally wounded. Among them were Henry Putnam and William Polly of Medford. It was between five and six o'clock that Percy crossed into Cambridge, then into the present city of Somerville at the corner of Beach and