hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Big Nance Creek (Alabama, United States) or search for Big Nance Creek (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

rtland. The infantry met no opposition. The cavalry skirmished most of the day in advance of the infantry, driving the enemy rapidly towards Courtland. At Pond Spring, three miles north-east of Courtland, he made a stand, but was immediately charged and routed by my cavalry. The report of Colonel Palmer, commanding the cavalry, herewith forwarded, gives a full account of this affair. December 30 My infantry moved to Courtland and went into camp on the south side of the town, on Big Nance Creek, the cavalry pushing on as far as Leighton, thirteen miles west of Courtland. At five o'lock P. M. I received a despatch from Colonel Palmer, written at Leighton, asking my permission to pursue, capture, and destroy Hood's pontoon train. I immediately gave him permission to exercise his own judgment in the matter. He decided to pursue, and in the most splendid manner not only accomplished all he proposed — the destruction of the pontoon train — but pursued, captured, and destroyed
December 30 My infantry moved to Courtland and went into camp on the south side of the town, on Big Nance Creek, the cavalry pushing on as far as Leighton, thirteen miles west of Courtland. At five o'lock P. M. I received a despatch from Colonel Palmer, written at Leighton, asking my permission to pursue, capture, and destroy Hood's pontoon train. I immediately gave him permission to exercise his own judgment in the matter. He decided to pursue, and in the most splendid manner not only accomplished all he proposed — the destruction of the pontoon train — but pursued, captured, and destroyed a supply train of one hundred and ten wagons. Colonel Palmer's command, in this enterprising and daring expedition, captured and destroyed upwards of three hundred wagons, nearly one thousand stand of arms, a large number of mules and oxen, and captured and turned over two pieces of artillery two hundred prisoners, including thirteen commissioned officers, and one hundred and seventy se