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James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 6: H. Clay Pate. (search)
d to a page of history by the stern old Puritan, and then placed, as a curious study, in the cabinet of human imbecilities forevermore. By way of a contrast, if for no other reason, he deserves a separate chapter here — does H. Clay Pate, of Black Jack and Virginia. Pate, by birth a Virginian, first sought to find fame and fortune in the city of Cincinnati. He published a thin volume of collegiate sketches, and several pointless, bombastically written stories, which, we are told, was embeDragoons, with their prisoners, encamped on Middle Ottawa Creek, while Pate went on with his men to the Santa Fe road, near Hickory Point. On the evening of Saturday, the 31st of May, he encamped on the head of a small branch or ravine, called Black Jack, from the kind of timber growing there. As soon as Captain Pate had reached the ground that was destined to witness his failure as a military man, and, at the same time, with a humor almost puritanic in its grimness, to satisfy his longings
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 7: battle of Black Jack. (search)
inity were congregated in the house of Dr. Graham to hear preaching, the doctor himself being a prisoner in the camp at Black Jack. They could watch as well as pray, however. There were some twenty men present, and most of them, after the old Revol2d, glimmered in, they had returned to Prairie City, when two scouts brought the tidings that the enemy was encamped on Black Jack, some four or five miles off. A small party was left to. guard the four prisoners, and the remainder immediately took uad galloped off as soon as he caught the first glimpse of them. Pate found and fought. Captain Pate's position at Black Jack was a very strong one. It afforded shelter for his men, and, except by a force coming up the ravine or stream from theons: the latter instantly returning it. Volley after volley pealed through the air, and echoed through the ravine at Black Jack, away up to the dense timber of Hickory Point. Meanwhile, Captain Brown had hurried into the ravine on the right of
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, A Sabbath gathering. (search)
A Sabbath gathering. After dinner on Sunday, Pate's men wanted to go over to Prairie City and plunder it. Fancying that it would be easily taken, and that no resistance would be offered, six of Pate's men started on the expedition. At the time this party approached Prairie City, the people of that place and vicinity were congregated in the house of Dr. Graham to hear preaching, the doctor himself being a prisoner in the camp at Black Jack. They could watch as well as pray, however. There were some twenty men present, and most of them, after the old Revolutionary pattern, had gone to church with their guns on their shoulders. It was one of those primitive meetings, which may often be found in the West, with the slight addition of its military aspects: simple and unostentatious garb; easy and primitive manners; a log house, the ribbed timbers of which gave a rough-cast look to the simple scene, with here and there the heavy octagon barrel of a long Western rifle, or the smooth
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, A search for Pate. (search)
A search for Pate. Through the whole of that Sunday night did Captain Brown and Shore's united company hunt for Captain Pate; but their search was unsuccessful. As the gray dawn of Monday morning, June 2d, glimmered in, they had returned to Prairie City, when two scouts brought the tidings that the enemy was encamped on Black Jack, some four or five miles off. A small party was left to. guard the four prisoners, and the remainder immediately took up their line of march for the enemy. Of those who thus left Prairie City, Captain Shore's company numbered twenty men, himself included; and Captain Brown had nine men besides himself. They rode towards the Black Jack. Arrived within a mile of it, they left their horses, and two of their men to guard them. They despatched two other messengers to distant points for additional assistance, if it should be needed. The remainder,twenty-six men, all told,--in two divisions, each captain having his own men, marched quietly forward on the
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Pate found and fought. (search)
Pate found and fought. Captain Pate's position at Black Jack was a very strong one. It afforded shelter for his men, and, except by a force coming up the ravine or stream from the timber at Hickory Point, had to be approached over an open prairie, sloping up from the place where the Missourians were posted. When the alarm was sounded, Captain Pate drew up his men in line behind the breastwork of wagons. When they neared the enemy's position, Captain Brown wished Shore to go to the leftng for or wanting any humbug parley, the gallant band poured in a volley on the Missourians, who were drawn up behind the wagons: the latter instantly returning it. Volley after volley pealed through the air, and echoed through the ravine at Black Jack, away up to the dense timber of Hickory Point. Meanwhile, Captain Brown had hurried into the ravine on the right of Captain Shore; and posting his men well, began to discourse the music of the spheres from that quarter. We're whipped! We
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 8: the conquest of Kansas complete. (search)
design of the Missourians, we marched upon Franklin on the night of the 2d of June,--only a few days after the fight at Black Jack,--and, after two or three hours of firing, chiefly in the dark, drove the ruffians out and captured their provisions. he invading forces. Mr. Cantroll was murdered by a ruffian named Forman, one of Captain Pate's men, who was wounded at Black Jack, carefully nursed at Prairie City, and dismissed by his captors uninjured. Of such were the Southern companies. The So rapidly and unexpectedly did the thing occur, that there was no opportunity to secure the arms and horses taken at Black Jack. Only fifteen of Brown's men were in the camp at the moment they entered it; Among them was John E. Cook, who, a fality. On the 4th of July, 1856, the crowning victory of the South was gained — not by their own cowardly forces, whom Black Jack, Franklin, and a series of successful guerilla fights had inspired with a salutary aversion to battles, but by compani
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 9: battle of Ossawatomie. (search)
ka about the end of July; and, on the 5th of August, entered the camp of the organized Northern companies, then known as Jim Lane's army, at a place four miles from the northern boundary line, which the emigrants had named Plymouth, in honor of the Puritans,--who had crossed the sea for the same purpose that they were now crossing the prairie: To make the West as they the East, The Homestead of the Free. A brother of John Brown's wounded son-in-law, on learning of the casualties of Black Jack, at once left North Elba, and joined the second Massachusetts Company at Buffalo. The old man rode into camp, and inquired if Wm. Thompson He fell at Harper's Ferry. was there. He found him, and they left the camp together. The Captain was riding a splendid horse, and was dressed in plain white summer clothing. He wore a large straw hat, and was closely shaven; every thing about him was scrupulously clean. He made a great impression, by his appearance, on several of the company; w
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, chapter 1.27 (search)
ve sick and wounded sons, and a son-in-law, were obliged to lie on the ground, without shelter, for a considerable time, and at times almost in a state of starvation, and dependent on the charity of the Christian Indian I have before named, and his wife. I saw Dr. Graham, of Prairie City, who was a prisoner with the ruffians on the 2d of June, and was present when they wounded him, in an attempt to kill him, s he was trying to save himself from being murdered by them during the fight at Black Jack. I know that numerous other persons, whose names I cannot now remember, suffered like hardships and exposures to those I have mentioned. I know well that on or about the 14th of September, 1856, a large force of Missourians and other ruffians, said by Governor Geary to be twenty-seven hundred in number, invaded the Territory, burned Franklin, and, while the smoke of that place was going up behind them, they, on the same day, made their appearance in full view of, and within about a
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 11: the political inquisitors. (search)
s your only object to free the negroes? Capt. B. Absolutely our only object. Bystander. But you went and took Col. Washington's silver and Match. Capt B. O, yes; we intended freely to have appropriated the property of slaveholders, to carry out our object. It was for that, and only that; and with no design to enrich ourselves with any plunder whatever. Q. Did you know Sherrod in Kansas? I understand you killed him. Capt. B. I killed no man except in fair fight. I fought at Black Jack, and at Ossawatomie; and if I killed any body, it was at one of those places. During this conversation, the wounded Liberators, we are told by pro-slavery writers, lay stretched on miserable shake-downs. John Brown's long gray hair was matted and tangled, and his hands and clothes all smooched and smeared with blood, and begrimed with dirt — the effect of continued exposure to the smoke of powder. His manner and conversation were courteous and affable, and he appeared to make a favora