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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 65 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 20, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battles. (search)
town HeightsOct. 13, 1812 St. RegisOct. 23, 1812 Fort NiagaraNov. 21, 1812 Black RockNov. 28, 1812 French Town (River Raisin)Jan. 18-22, 1813 Elizabethtown (Cana IslandJune 22, 1813 Beaver DamsJune 23, 1813 Near Fort GeorgeJuly 8, 1813 Black RockJuly 11, 1813 Fort George (Defence of Outworks)July 17, 1813 Fort Stephenson13 AuttoseNov. 29, 1813 Fort NiagaraDec. 19, 1813 EconochacaDec. 23, 1813 Black RockDec. 30, 1813 Emucfau (Ala.)Jan. 22, 1814 Enotochopco (Ala.)Jan. 24, 1814 Ctown HeightsOct. 13, 1812 St. RegisOct. 23, 1812 Fort NiagaraNov. 21, 1812 Black RockNov. 28, 1812 French Town (River Raisin)Jan. 18-22, 1813 Elizabethtown (Cana IslandJune 22, 1813 Beaver DamsJune 23, 1813 Near Fort GeorgeJuly 8, 1813 Black RockJuly 11, 1813 Fort George (Defence of Outworks)July 17, 1813 Fort Stephenson13 AuttoseNov. 29, 1813 Fort NiagaraDec. 19, 1813 EconochacaDec. 23, 1813 Black RockDec. 30, 1813 Emucfau (Ala.)Jan. 22, 1814 Enotochopco (Ala.)Jan. 24, 1814 C
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Black Rock, surprise of. (search)
Black Rock, surprise of. On July 11, 1813. Lieut.-Col. Cecil Bisshopp, with a motley party of regulars. Canadians, and Indians, about 400 in number, crossed the Niagara River and landed a little below Black Rock (which was a naval station, two miles below Buffalo). just before daylight. His object was to surprise and capturBlack Rock (which was a naval station, two miles below Buffalo). just before daylight. His object was to surprise and capture the garrison, and especially the large quantity of stores collected there by the Americans; also the shipyard. These were defended by only about 200 militia and a dozen men in a blockhouse. There were some infantry and Bisshopp's monument dragoon recruits from the South on their way to Fort George, besides a little more thanated at Philadelphia, and had gone hack to his blanket and feather head-dress. The former were under the command of Gen. Peter B. porter, then at his home near Black Rock. Bisshopp surprised the camp at Black Pock. when the militia fled to Buffalo. leaving their artillery behind. Porter narrowly escaped capture in his own hou
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Buffalo, (search)
er. Full license had been given to his Indians, and the desolation was made perfect almost to Black Rock. Riall marched up from Queenston (Dec. 28) to Chippewa, Lieutenant-General Drummond in immediled out the militia and invited volunteers. Hall took chief command of troops now gathered at Black Rock and Buffalo, 2,000 strong. From Drummond's camp, opposite Black Rock, Riall crossed the riverBlack Rock, Riall crossed the river (Dec. 30) with about 1,000 white men and Indians. The night was dark. They drove the Americans from Black Rock. The militia were alarmed, and at dawn Hall ascertained that 800 of them had desertedBlack Rock. The militia were alarmed, and at dawn Hall ascertained that 800 of them had deserted. Hall. with the rest of his force, proceeded to attack the invaders. He, too, had a force of Indians: but these, with more of the militia, soon gave way, and, the commander's force broken, he was iour buildings were A view of Buffalo's waterfront to-day. left standing in the village. At Black Rock only a single building escaped the flames. Four vessels which had done good service on Lake E
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Croker, Richard 1843- (search)
Croker, Richard 1843- Politician; born in Black Rock, Ireland, Nov. 24, 1843; was brought to the United States when two years old; received a public school education in New York; was alderman in 1868-70 and 1883; coroner in 1873-76; fire commissioner in 1883; and city chamberlain in 1889-90. He took a prominent part in opposing the Tweed Ring, and since the death of John Kelly has been the recognized leader of Tammany Hall. For several years Mr. Croker has passed a large part of his time annually in England.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Drummond, Sir George Gordon, 1771-1854 (search)
Drummond, Sir George Gordon, 1771-1854 Military officer; born in Quebec in 1771; entered the British army in 1789; served in Holland and Egypt; and in 1811 was made lieutenant-general. In 1813 he was second in command to Sir George Prevost; planned the capture of Fort Niagara in December of that year; took the villages of Black Rock and Buffalo; captured Oswego in May, 1814; and was in chief command of the British forces at the battle of Lundy's Lane (q. v.)in July. In August he was repulsed at Fort Erie, with heavy loss, and was severely wounded. He succeeded Prevost in 1814, and returned to England in 1816. The next year he received the grand cross of the Bath. He died in London, Oct. 10, 1854.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Erie, Fort, (search)
weak fortification erected on a plain 12 or 15 feet above the waters of Lake Erie, at its foot. In the summer of 1812, Black Rock, 2 miles below Buffalo, was selected as a place for a dock-yard for fitting out naval vessels for Lake Erie. Lieut. Jesmed seamen arrived from New York. Elliott turned to the military for assistance. Lieutenant-Colonel Scott was then at Black Rock, and entered warmly into Elliott's plans. General Smyth, the commanding officer, favored them. Captain Towson, of thean a siege of Fort Erie, with about 5,000 men. Drummond perceived the importance of capturing the American batteries at Black Rock and seizing or destroying the armed schooners in the lake. A force 1,200 strong, that went over to Black Rock, were reBlack Rock, were repulsed by riflemen, militia, and volunteers, under Major Morgan. Meanwhile Drummond had opened fire on Fort Erie with some 24-pounders. From Aug. 7 to Aug. 14 (1814) the cannonade and bombardment was almost incessant. General Gaines had arrived on
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Erie, Lake, battle on. (search)
o hasten the construction and equipment of a little navy there designed to co-operate with General Harrison in attempts to recover Michigan. Four vessels were speedily built at Erie, and five others were taken to that well-sheltered harbor from Black Rock, near Buffalo, where Henry Eckford (q. v.)had converted merchant-vessels into war-ships. The vessels at Erie were constructed under the immediate supervision of Sailing-Master Daniel Dobbins, at the mouth of Cascade Creek. Early in May (1813)and more than sufficient and ready to make sail, and yet obliged to bite my fingers with vexation for want of men. Perry, anxiously waiting for men to man his little fleet at Erie, was partially gratified by the arrival there of 100 men from Black Rock, under Captain Elliott, and early in August, 1813, he went out on the lake before he was fairly prepared for vigorous combat. On Aug. 17, when off Sandusky Bay, he fired a signalgun for General Harrison, according to agreement. Harrison was e
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Izard, George 1777-1828 (search)
iagara frontier, in 1814, with the rank of major-general. From 1825 until his death he was governor of Arkansas Territory. Early in September, 1814, he moved towards Sackett's Harbor, under the direction of the Secretary of War, with about 4,000 troops, where he received a despatch from General Brown at Fort Erie, Sept. 10, urging him to move on to his support, as he had not more than 2,000 effective men. The first division of Izard's troops arrived at Lewiston on Oct. 5. He moved up to Black Rock, crossed the Niagara River, Oct. 10-11, and encamped 2 miles north of Fort Erie. Ranking General Brown, he took the chief command of the combined forces, then numbering, with volunteers and militia, about 8,000 men. He prepared to march against Drummond, who, after the sortie at Fort Erie, had moved down to Queenston. Izard moved towards Chippewa, and vainly endeavored to draw Drummond out. He had some skirmishing in an attempt to destroy a quantity of grain belonging to the British,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Niagara, Fort (search)
he Niagara and made his headquarters at Buffalo, where General Brown appeared at the close of June. On the morning of July 3, Generals Scott and Ripley crossed the Niagara River with a considerable force and captured Fort Erie, nearly opposite Black Rock. The garrison withdrew to the intrenched camp of General Riall at Chippewa, a few miles below. The Americans pressed forward, and in the open fields near Chippewa they fought Riall's army (July 5), and drove the British in haste to Burlington loss (see Erie, Fort). Nearly a month elapsed without much being done, when General Brown, who had resumed the chief command, ordered a sortie from the fort. It was successful (Sept. 17). The Americans pressed the besiegers back towards Chippewa. Informed that General Izard was approaching with reinforcements for Brown, Drummond retired to Fort George. The Americans abandoned and destroyed Fort Erie Nov. 5, crossed the river, and went into winter quarters at Black Rock, Buffalo, and Batavia.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Porter, Peter Buel 1773-1844 (search)
Porter, Peter Buel 1773-1844 Military officer; born in Salisbury, Conn., Aug. 4, 1773; studied law, and began practice at Canandaigua, N. Y., in 1795; was a member of Congress from 1809 to 1813, and again in 1815-16. He settled at Black Rock, near General Porter's medal. Buffalo, where he and his brothers made large purchases of land along the Niagara River. A leader of volunteers on the Niagara frontier, he became distinguished for his skill and bravery, and received the thanks of Congress and a gold medal. President Madison offered him the position Peter Buel, Porter. of commander-in-chief of the army in 1815, which he declined. He was secretary of state of New York (1815-16), and was Secretary of War, under President John Quincy Adams, in 1828. General Porter was one of the early projectors of the Erie Canal, and one of the first board of commissioners. He died at Niagara Falls, March 20, 1844.
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