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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 30 10 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 29 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 22 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 22 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 14 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 22, 1862., [Electronic resource] 12 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 7 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Bluff Point (North Carolina, United States) or search for Bluff Point (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 5 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 5: capture of the works at Hatteras Inlet by Flag officer Stringham.--destruction of the privateer Judah. (search)
bombardment and capture of forts Hatteras and Clark. the garrison surrender to General Butler and Commodore Stringham. effect of the capture of forts Hatteras and Clark on the Confederates. destruction of Fort Ocracoke. the Pamlico and Albemarle Sounds. Colonel Hawkins sends a regiment to take possession of Chicacomico. capture of the transport Fanny by Confederate steamers. plans of the Confederates frustrated. Colonel Brown and Colonel Hawkins join hands. the Monticello renders goodnot until the Navy had been largely increased by the addition of the proper kind of vessels,that the United States Government was able to get possession of all the important points in the Sounds. The subsequent operations upon Pamlico and Albemarle Sounds and their rivers show how important a base these formed for the Confederates, and how difficult it would have been to crush the rebellion had they remained in their possesion. Colonel Hawkins, who had been left in command of Fort Hatteras
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 11: Goldsborough's expedition to the sounds of North Carolina. (search)
pedition for the purpose of capturing Roanoke Island, and getting possession of Pamlico and Albemarle Sounds. This had become a necessity, as the Confederates had facilities for fitting out light a Pamlico Sound, and therefore the first object of this expedition was to gain possession of Albemarle Sound and the connecting waters, through which the Confederates were carrying on an active trade.dable barrier by the erection of heavy fortifications The channel connecting Pamlico and Albemarle Sounds in which Roanoke Island lies is very shallow, and could therefore be easily obstructed by sfall into our hands, they determined to fortify Roanoke Island and prevent our getting into Albemarle Sound; so that they could hold communication with Norfolk through the Currituck Inlet and save Pl was equal to the occasion. Late in the afternoon of the 9th this fleet of vessels entered Albemarle Sound in search of the enemy, and soon after sighted the smoke of two steamers, which were seen t
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 34: (search)
ll who served under him, as for its brevity and truthfulness; he could have said no more had he used a folio of words: Order.United States Steamer Delaware. off Elizabeth City. February 11th, 1862. The commander of the flotilla in Albemarle Sound avails himself of the earliest moment to make a public acknowledgment of the coolness, gallantry and skill displayed by the officers and men under his command in the capture and destruction of the enemy's batteries and squadron at Cobb's Poithe houses of their own defenceless women and children, is a striking evidence of the justice of our cause, and must have its effect in teaching our deluded countrymen a lesson in humanity and civilization. S. C. Rowan, Commanding Flotilla, Albemarle Sound, For the present we must discontinue the narrative of operations in the sounds of North Carolina. As has been seen, there was scarcely a large gun left in the hands of the enemy, of the many that were mounted when the little naval flo
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 35: operations of the North Atlantic Squadron, 1863. (search)
part of the State to the other with such rapidity and energetic action that the Confederates could make no headway against them. This course would have placed the Army in a more independent position, and they would not have become impressed with the idea that every soldier ought to carry a gun-boat in his pocket. On May 27th, Lieutenant Flusser reports an expedition under Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant Charles A. French, who went in the steamer Whitehead to cruise in the eastern end of Albemarle Sound, and break up the contraband trade, a great deal of which was carried on in that vicinity. Lieutenant French reports the capture of a large two-masted boat, containing 500 barrels of tobacco. In Alligator River he captured or destroyed several boats engaged in illicit trade, and also along the shore a large quantity of pork, bacon, leather, tobacco bags, lard and tallow ready for shipment to the enemy. Many grist mills, grinding corn for the enemy, were burned by the officers of the
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 49: first attack on Fort Fisher.--destruction of the confederate ram Albemarle, etc. (search)
rid of the ram, and depriving her for the time being of power to do further mischief, is proof that he was master of the situation. This was the view taken of the affair by the Navy Department, as is shown by the following complimentary letter: Navy Department, May 25, 1864. Sir — I have had great satisfaction in receiving and perusing your report, as the senior officer of the several vessels that were engaged with the rebel rain Albemarle and her tender on the 5th instant, in Albemarle Sound. The Department congratulates all the officers and men of the United States Navy who participated in this remarkable contest between wooden gun-boats and a formidable armored vessel, in which the latter was forced to retreat to prevent capture, and it particularly thanks you for the vigilant and gallant use made of the means placed at your command to thwart the designs of the rebels to regain control of the Sounds of North Carolina. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Captain Mela