Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Broad Run (Virginia, United States) or search for Broad Run (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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ement occurred between Hooker's division and Ewell's division of Jackson's forces. The action commenced about four miles west of Bristow station. Ewell was driven back along the railroad, but still confronted Hooker at dark along the banks of Broad Run, immediately in front of Bristow station, at which point I arrived at sunset. The loss in this engagement was about three hundred killed and wounded on each side, the enemy leaving his dead, many of his wounded, and much of his baggage on the ived at Warrenton at daylight next morning. Here we remained in camp until the morning of the twenty-seventh, when we received orders to take the advance in the direction of Gainesville. We started at daylight. My cavalry, upon arriving at Broad Run, within four miles of Gainesville, found the bridge on fire, and the rebel cavalry, with one piece of artillery, drawn up on the other side. Major Krepps, commanding my cavalry detachment, immediately ordered a charge, and after two successive
ement occurred between Hooker's division and Ewell's division of Jackson's forces. The action commenced about four miles west of Bristow station. Ewell was driven back along the railroad, but still confronted Hooker at dark along the banks of Broad Run, immediately in front of Bristow station, at which point I arrived at sunset. The loss in this engagement was about three hundred killed and wounded on each side, the enemy leaving his dead, many of his wounded, and much of his baggage on the ived at Warrenton at daylight next morning. Here we remained in camp until the morning of the twenty-seventh, when we received orders to take the advance in the direction of Gainesville. We started at daylight. My cavalry, upon arriving at Broad Run, within four miles of Gainesville, found the bridge on fire, and the rebel cavalry, with one piece of artillery, drawn up on the other side. Major Krepps, commanding my cavalry detachment, immediately ordered a charge, and after two successive