Your search returned 73 results in 20 document sections:

1 2
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 14.55 (search)
inhabitants that they would be protected in life and property. This message was delivered to the only white man found, who sat in the. post-office and seemed quite dazed. At General Drayton's headquarters was found a chart of the coast, and, in red-pencil marks, a very valuable addition, no less than the position of all the earth-works within his command, the number of guns being shown by the number of red marks in each locality. All of the batteries indicated from North Edisto south to Tybee were found to be abandoned; the guns, however, had been removed, with the exception of some inferior pieces. Wherever the gunboats penetrated, into harbors or rivers, huge columns of white smoke were seen on all sides from the burning cotton, far out of our reach, had it been the special object of our visit to secure it. Thus the enemy inflicted upon the inhabitants injuries they Pope's House, Hilton head, used by the union army as a signal-station. From a war-time sketch. would otherwis
202.) The Concordia Cavalry, Capt. Benjamin, left their encampment at Concordia, La., on the Magenta, for Bowling Green, Ky. They bear in their midst a large-sized black flag, on which appear, in bold relief, death's head and bare bones. These Concordians go to expel, not capture, vandal invaders of their homes and firesides, and they will make their mark.--Concordia Intelligencer, November 29. This morning the schooner Waterman, Capt. Huron, for Charleston, S. C., was wrecked off Tybee. She fell into the hands of the Yankee blockaders.--Last night the cotton and provisions on Hutchinson, Fenwick, and adjoining islands were destroyed by fire by the proprietors.--Commissary-General Whitaker, of Georgia, seized in that State, one thousand five hundred and forty sacks of salt, for which he paid as directed by Governor Brown.--The colored people of Vicksburg, Miss., advertise in the papers of that city to give a ball for the benefit of the soldiers from that State, in the Conf
Fort Pulaski, demanding the unconditional surrender of the place. To this Col. Olmstead replied in a very gentlemanly and witty note, stating that he was placed there to defend, not to surrender the Fort. Upon receipt of this, the batteries on Tybee opened fire. After firing a few rounds from the several batteries, a chance shot carried away the halliards on Pulaski, and the confederate flag fell to the earth. At this point the fire slackened, the Nationals not knowing but that the occupants of the Fort had concluded to succumb. Presently, instead of the white flag, the stars and bars were once more seen waving from a temporary flag-staff on the parapet. The batteries on Tybee recommenced with redoubled vigor, and the firing continued without cessation during the remainder of the day. Toward night, Gen. Gilmore being satisfied, from the effects of th Parrott guns and James's projectiles during th day, of the practicability of breaching the Fort, again slackened the firing, in
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Siege and capture of Fort Pulaski. (search)
d the news of the surrender to the Confederates] arrived in the fort in company with the signal man, whom he went to pilot, at 5 o'clock Friday morning, the day of the surrender, He remained inside the works during the whole of the bombardment on that day, and left as the flag was lowered [not being a member of the garrison], making his way to the south wharf as the enemy's steamer was approaching the north landing. When the bombardment commenced on Thursday none of the enemy's batteries on Tybee were visible, except from the smoke which pointed out the different localities to our garrison. . . . The firing of the enemy on Thursday was not so effective as to create an apprehension that the work would fall. The enemy were obtaining the range of their guns for the operations of night and the day following. . . . The north-east casemates were all in which the garrison could bunk with any security whatever through Thursday night, though but little sleep was enjoyed, as the enemy threw t
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 5: military and naval operations on the coast of South Carolina.--military operations on the line of the Potomac River. (search)
pearance of the tower when I sketched it, in April, 1866. its height had been somewhat. Diminished by demolishing a portion of its upper part, on which rested a roof. Such towers had been erected early in the present century along the British coasts, as a defense against an expected invasion by Bonaparte. The lower story was used for stores, and the upper, being bomb-proof, as secure quarters for the men. The walls. Terminated in a parapet, behind which cannon were placed. The tower at Tybee was built of solid masonry, like the best of those on the British coast. approach of the National gunboats, the de fenses, which consisted of a strong martello tower erected there during the war of 1812, and a battery at its base, were abandoned, and on the 25th Nov., 1861. Dupont wrote to the Secretary of War: The flag of the United States is flying over the territory of the State of Georgia. Besides those on Hilton Head, and at Bay Point on Phillip's Island, there were five other for
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 12: operations on the coasts of the Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico. (search)
ds distant. Each battery had a service magazine for two days supply of ammunition, and a depot powder magazine of 8,000 barrels capacity was constructed near the Martello tower, printed on page 125, which was the landing-place for all supplies on Tybee. On that day the commanding General issued minute orders for the working of the batteries, which was to corn mence at daybreak the next morning. See the report of General Gillmore, dated April 80, 1862. General David Hunter, who had just succeeded General Sherman March 31, 1862. in the command of the Department, arrived at Tybee on the evening of the 8th, accompanied by General Benham as district commander. At sunrise on the morning of the 10th, Hunter sent Lieutenant J. H. Wilson to the fort, with a summons to the commander of the garrison (Colonel Charles H. Olmstead, of the First Georgia Volunteers) to surrender. It was refused, the commander saying, I am here to defend this fort, not to surrender it, and at a quarter past
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 8: capture of Fernandina and the coast South of Georgia. (search)
es. sea Islands. Congregation of slaves at Hilton Head. entrenchments erected at Hilton Head. General Stevens. Beaufort occupied. reconnoissance up the Tybee River to Fort Pulaski. expedition to Fernandina. commanders of and vessels composing the expedition. capture of the works on Cumberland and Amelia Islands. Fort CArmy had also occupied Beaufort, a pleasant village near Port Royal, where many wealthy land-holders resided during the hot season. Posts were also established on Tybee and other islands. The enemy gradually recovered from the panic which had seized them at the battle of Port Royal, and seemed disposed to commence offensive ope; nor did they ever attempt to obtain a lodgment on Port Royal Island, which remained in possession of the government during the war. A reconnoissance up the Tybee River was made by Captain C. H. Davis and Commander C. R. P. Rodgers with the Ottawa, Seneca, Ellen, Western World, and the armed launches of the Wabash, accompanied
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
have the honor to inform the Department that the flag of the United States is flying over the territory of the State of Georgia. As soon as the serious injury to the boilers of the Flag had been repaired, I dispatched Commander John Rodgers to Tybee entrance, the mouth of Savannah River, to report to Commander Missroon, the senior officer, for a preliminary examination of the bars, and for the determination of the most suitable place for sinking the proposed obstructions to the navigation ofrenew his approaches with caution, and, if no opposition was met with, to occupy the channel. I am happy now to have it in my power to inform the Department that the Flag, the Augusta, and the Pocahontas, are at anchor in the harbor abreast of Tybee beacon and light, and that the Savannah has been ordered to take the same position. The abandonment of Tybee Island, on which there is a strong Martello tower, with a battery at its base, is due to the terror inspired by the bombardment of For
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Letters relating to the battle of Port Royal and occupation of the Confederate forts. (search)
have the honor to inform the Department that the flag of the United States is flying over the territory of the State of Georgia. As soon as the serious injury to the boilers of the Flag had been repaired, I dispatched Commander John Rodgers to Tybee entrance, the mouth of Savannah River, to report to Commander Missroon, the senior officer, for a preliminary examination of the bars, and for the determination of the most suitable place for sinking the proposed obstructions to the navigation ofrenew his approaches with caution, and, if no opposition was met with, to occupy the channel. I am happy now to have it in my power to inform the Department that the Flag, the Augusta, and the Pocahontas, are at anchor in the harbor abreast of Tybee beacon and light, and that the Savannah has been ordered to take the same position. The abandonment of Tybee Island, on which there is a strong Martello tower, with a battery at its base, is due to the terror inspired by the bombardment of For
and the temporary occupation of the waters of Warsaw Sound, as well as for a knowledge of the inner and ultimate line of defences selected by the enemy, I have the pleasure to refer to the accompanying report of Commander C. R. P. Rogers, upon whose judgment and skill I relied for the execution of this undertaking. Warsaw Inlet and Sound constitute a second entrance into Savannah River; and, as twenty-one feet can be carried over the bar at high water, this passage is but little inferior to Tybee entrance. The highest point reached by Commander Rogers was about eight miles from Warsaw bar, about ten from Savannah, and between four and five from Thunderbolt on one side and Montgomery on the other. These two last places are described in the coast survey memoirs and reports. I attach the highest value to this possession. I have the honor to be sir, respectfully, your obedient servant, S. F. Dupont, Flag-Officer Commanding. Report of Commander C. R. P, Rogers. United Stat
1 2