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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 151 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 50 0 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 20 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 13 7 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 5 3 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 15, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for Buzzard Roost (Georgia, United States) or search for Buzzard Roost (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
ts of operations against Petersburg and Richmond from August 1 to December 31, 1864, will appear in Vol. XLII. By the 7th of February our lines were extended to Hatcher's Run, and the Weldon railroad had been destroyed to Hicksford. General Sherman moved from Chattanooga on the 16th of May, with the Armies of the Cumberland, Tennessee, and Ohio, commanded, respectively, by Generals Thomas, McPherson, and Schofield, upon Johnston's army at Dalton; but finding the enemy's positions at Buzzard Roost, covering Dalton, too strong to be assaulted, General McPherson was sent through Snake [Creek] Gap to turn it, while Generals Thomas and Schofield threatened it in front and on the north. This movement was successful. Johnston, finding his retreat likely to be cut off, fell back to his fortified position at Resaca, where he was attacked on the afternoon of May 15. A heavy battle ensued. During the night the enemy retreated south. Late on the 17th his rear guard was overtaken near Ad
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 3 (search)
Hill. Skirmish near Ringgold Gap. May 3, 1864.Skirmish at Catoosa Springs. Skirmish at Red Clay. Skirmish at Chickamauga Creek. May 4, 1864.Maj. Gen. Frank P. Blair, jr., assumes command of the Seventeenth Army Corps. Skirmish on the Varnell's Station Road. May 5, 1864.Skirmish near Tunnel Hill. May 6-7, 1864.Skirmishes at Tunnel Hill. May 7, 1864.Skirmish at Varnell's Station. Skirmish near Nickajack Gap. May 8-11, 1864.Demonstration against Rocky Face Ridge, with combats at Buzzard Roost or Mill Creek Gap, and Dug Gap. May 8-13, 1864.Demonstration against Resaca, with combats at Snake Creek Gap, Sugar Valley, and near Resaca. May 9-13, 1864.Demonstration against Dalton, with combats near Varnell's Station (9th and 12th) and at Dalton (13th). May 13, 1864.Skirmish at Tilton. May 14-15, 1864.Battle of Resaca. May 15, 1864.Skirmish at Armuchee Creek. Skirmish near Rome. May 16, 1864.Skirmish near Calhoun. Action at Rome (or Parker's) Cross-Roads. Skirmish at Floyd'
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
and General Mc- Pherson aiming for Resaca, eighteen miles south of Dalton, through Snake Creek Gap and Sugar Valley. The enemy lay at Dalton, holding the Buzzard Roost Pass, the line of Mill Creek to the north, and his line of railway back toward Atlanta. My purpose was that General McPherson should reach the railway at Resaached Resaca with little difficulty but did not break the road. As soon as I learned this I left General Howard's corps (the Fourth) with cavalry to watch the Buzzard Roost Pass and moved the whole army to Resaca. From the Rocky Face Ridge the enemy had a full view of our movement and a shorter and better line to reach Resaca, sooming to watch and hold it, and on the 9th General Schofield pushed down close on Dalton from the north, while General Thomas renewed his demonstration against Buzzard Roost and Rocky Face Ridge, pushing it almost to a battle. One division (General Newton's) of the Fourth Corps (General Howard's) carried the ridge, and turning sou
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 11 (search)
nel Hill on the appearance of Howard's column on his flank, and fled toward Buzzard Roost, our troops occupying Tunnel Hill Ridge. Palmer's command was then moved f p. m. and camped for the night, picketing strongly the roads leading from Buzzard Roost and Dalton, as well as the approaches from the direction of Villanow. Geners and drove the enemy to his intrenchments, our men occupying the mouth of Buzzard Roost. Geary's division, of the Twentieth Corps, made a reconnaissance well up tf Chattoogata Mountain (a high and precipitous ridge running due south from Buzzard Roost). Geary's men fought their way well up to the enemy's intrenchments on the toneman's cavalry could arrive and relieve him. From a prisoner captured at Buzzard Roost we learned that the force defending the passage of the gap amounted to 11,0 quarter, while Howard was keeping t p the impression of a direct attack on Buzzard Roost. This movement was to commence on the 12th. Instructions were given to c
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 12 (search)
command showed marked indications of improvement. After the movement to the south of Atlanta, which resulted in its evacuation, the troops had access to the extensive corn-fields on the line of the march and improved rapidly, and on entering the city on the 7th of September there was little if any of the scorbutic taint perceptible, and the men were in finer condition and better able to. take the field than at any time since their leaving Chattanooga. The troops wounded at and near Buzzard Roost and Rocky Face Ridge were transferred by rail to the hospitals at Chattanooga. Those wounded near Resaca were treated for some days at the division hospitals and thence transferred to the general field hospital, where the most seriously wounded were retained until they were in condition to be conveyed in the hospital train to the hospitals at the rear. After the first action near Dallas, the wounded were brought in wagons to Kingston and thence by rail to Chattanooga. Those wounded in
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 15 (search)
defend so narrow a path, he could not reach it. In the mean time Generals Stanley and Wood pushed strong skirmish lines, well supported, as far up the western slope as possible. During the night following, General Newton succeeded in getting two pieces of artillery upon the ridge. The next morning, May 9, he attempted to make farther progress and succeeded in driving the enemy from 50 to 100 yards. General Stanley during the afternoon of the 9th made a :reconnaissance into the pass of Buzzard Roost, developing a strong musketry and artillery fire, while General Wood's division continued the same operations as the day before. The casualties in my command resulting from these operations were between 200 and 300 killed and wounded. In accordance with instructions from General Thomas, the Fourth Corps made preparations to remain near Buzzard Roost Gap for the purpose of holding the enemy at Dalton, if possible, while the rest of the army, excepting Stoneman's cavalry, was moving t
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 17 (search)
ted in all the movements, skirmishes, and battles in which the Army of the Cumberland was engaged. It moved from Cleveland, Tenn., on the 3d day of May, and on the 4th of that month encountered the cavalry pickets of the rebel army near Catoosa Springs, and formed connection with the other corps of the Army of the Cumberland at that point. From that time until the 7th of the present month it was engaged in a series of skirmishes and battles, the most prominent of which are Tunnel Hill, Buzzard Roost, Resaca, Calhoun, Adairsville, Kingston, Dallas, Kenesaw, and Atlanta. The system of brigade hospitals was abolished at the outset of the campaign, and that of division hospitals established, as by Circular No. 4, of March 25, 1863, from the Surgeon-General's Office. This system, with a few modifications, was also ordered as a permanent organization, and at the present time is in full and successful operation. The frequent changes in the position of the troops necessitated almos
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 18 (search)
ning his batteries upon them they very easily fell into our hands. The skirmishers of this division advanced with those of General Davis' division, driving the rebels into their intrenchments and developing the full strength of the position before us. Early the next morning our skirmishers pushed up to the foot of the palisades under cover of the brushwood, and maintained a constant fire with the enemy all day. In the evening I received orders to press the enemy strongly in the gorge of Buzzard Roost. This duty was assigned Colonel Champion with his own regiment (the Ninety-sixth Illinois) and Eighty-fourth Indiana, Lieutenant-Colonel Neff. Our men drove the rebels quickly to their main lines, and pushed up to the foot of the perpendicular rocks of the mountain and maintained themselves until night, when all but the pickets were withdrawn. The fire of the enemy was severe, much of it coming almost from overhead. Our loss in this affair was 50 or 60 men killed and wounded. Major
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 51 (search)
ing the brigade. On the following morning we resumed our march and entered upon a very eventful campaign, known as The Georgia campaign of 1864. When we rejoined the brigade we numbered 20 commissioned officers and 238 enlisted men. On the 8th of May we skirmished a part of the day and participated in the capture of Rocky Face Ridge, and went on picket in the evening, and were not relieved in time the next day to take part in the bloody and unsuccessful assault upon the enemy's fort on Buzzard Roost or Rocky Face, where our brigade lost so many of its brave officers and men. On the 13th we marched to the front with the balance of the brigade, the enemy having left our front during the past night. We found him again strongly posted near Resaca, where we engaged him in the afternoon of the 14th, relieving the Third Kentucky Regiment and holding our ground for one hour, when we were relieved to replenish our ammunition. Our loss in this short engagement was 3 officers severely wounde
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 52 (search)
No. 48. report of Capt. Albert M. Tilton, Fifty-first Illinois Infantry. headquarters Fifty-First Illinois Infantry, Near Atlanta, Ga., September 12, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to submit the following condensed report of operations of my command during the late campaign: Left Cleveland, Tenn., May 3, and commenced skirmishing on the 5th at Buzzard Roost, where, on the 9th, part of the regiment participated in an unsuccessful charge on the enemy's works. Had 2 men wounded at this point. The enemy fell back on the night of the 12th, and we passed through Dalton on the 13th in pursuit, and engaged them at Resaca on the 14th, losing Captain Lester, killed, and 20 men wounded. The enemy evacuated his works on the night of the 15th, and we followed, skirmishing continually until the 19th, when we halted, and the whole army rested for three days near Kingston. Resumed the march on the 23d, and found the enemy on the 25th near Dallas. After eleven days skirmishing th
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