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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 22 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 20 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 18 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 12 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Capitol (Utah, United States) or search for Capitol (Utah, United States) in all documents.

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thirty-five thousand, of which thirteen thousand were prisoners. The last conflicts in the Shenandoah The capitol in war time War's wreckage in the Shenandoah valley Ruins of the Virginia Military Institute at Lexington, after Harched until it had become almost a beaten track. With that celerity of movement characteristic of Confederate The capitol at Washington in 1863 When the Capitol at Washington was threatened by the Confederate armies, it was still an unfiniks of its floor were removed. Entrance to Washington from the South--the famous chain bridge Long bridge and the capitol across the broad Potomac the afternoon General Wright sent out General Wheaton with Bidwell's brigade of Getty's divisissed the Potomac, forced back Lew Wallace with his six thousand Federals at the Monocacy, and camped within sight of the capitol's dome at Washington. Much of this marching had been at the rate of twenty miles a day, and at one time half of the com
The last conflicts in the Shenandoah The capitol in war time War's wreckage in the Shenandoah valley Ruins of the Virginia Military Institute at Lexington, after Hunter's raid in 1864. The picture shows the blackened walls of thearched until it had become almost a beaten track. With that celerity of movement characteristic of Confederate The capitol at Washington in 1863 When the Capitol at Washington was threatened by the Confederate armies, it was still an unfiniks of its floor were removed. Entrance to Washington from the South--the famous chain bridge Long bridge and the capitol across the broad Potomac the afternoon General Wright sent out General Wheaton with Bidwell's brigade of Getty's divisissed the Potomac, forced back Lew Wallace with his six thousand Federals at the Monocacy, and camped within sight of the capitol's dome at Washington. Much of this marching had been at the rate of twenty miles a day, and at one time half of the com
The Confederate ranks plunged on, carrying the helpless brigades along. With tremendous momentum they rushed toward the works. The guns along the Federal line were silent. They dare not fire on their own routed men. The weight of the oncoming mass of humanity broke through the first line of Nashville. Shortly after the occupation of Nashville by the Union forces in February, 1862, General Morton, of the U. S. Corps of Engineers, began work on its fortifications. Around the capitol were built earth parapets and stockades, and enough room was provided to mount fifteen guns. The strong, massive structure, plentifully supplied with water, could easily accommodate a regiment of infantry — enough in such a citadel to hold an entire army at bay. This, however, was but a part of the entire line of defenses he planned. He was intending to fortify Morton and Houston Hills, and a third on which Fort Negley was actually constructed. The pictures show the city which the works
The Confederate ranks plunged on, carrying the helpless brigades along. With tremendous momentum they rushed toward the works. The guns along the Federal line were silent. They dare not fire on their own routed men. The weight of the oncoming mass of humanity broke through the first line of Nashville. Shortly after the occupation of Nashville by the Union forces in February, 1862, General Morton, of the U. S. Corps of Engineers, began work on its fortifications. Around the capitol were built earth parapets and stockades, and enough room was provided to mount fifteen guns. The strong, massive structure, plentifully supplied with water, could easily accommodate a regiment of infantry — enough in such a citadel to hold an entire army at bay. This, however, was but a part of the entire line of defenses he planned. He was intending to fortify Morton and Houston Hills, and a third on which Fort Negley was actually constructed. The pictures show the city which the works