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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 10, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Closing operations in the Gulf and western rivers. (search)
et the Richmond, and finding farther advance impossible Read ran her ashore and burnt her. On the 3d of June Lieutenant-Commander W. E. Fitzhugh received the surrender of Lieutenant J. H. Carter and the Confederate naval forces under his command in the Red River. On the west Gulf coast the blockade continued until the end, several important cutting-out expeditions occurring during January and February. Among these the most noteworthy were the capture of the Delphina, January 22d, in Calcasieu River, by Lieutenant-Commander R. W. Meade; of the Pet and the Anna Sophia, February 7th, at Galveston, by an expedition organized by Commander J. R. M. Mullany; and of the Anna Dale, February 18th, at Pass Cavallo, by a party sent in by Lieutenant-Commander Henry Erben. After the surrender of Mobile, Admiral Thatcher turned his attention to the coast of Texas, and on May 25th Sabine Pass was evacuated. On the 2d of June Galveston surrendered, and the war on the Texas coast came to an end.
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 53: operations of the West Gulf Squadron in the latter part of 1864, and in 1865.--joint operations in Mobile Bay by Rear-Admiral Thatcher and General Canby. (search)
ace, Coxswain; Jacob Bowman, Captain Forecastle; William Thompson, Captain Forecastle; Augustus Miller, Captain After-guard; Peter Miller, Seaman; Thomas K. Fenley, Landsman. On January 24th, 1865, quite as clever an affair took place off Calcasieu River, by a cutting-out expedition. under Lieutenant-Commander Richard W. Meade, which was a complete success without any casualties. A three-masted schooner, loaded with cotton, was lying at the second bend of the Calcasieu River, about two andCalcasieu River, about two and a half miles from its mouth, ready to slip out at the first opportunity, and the object of the expedition was her capture. As a large force of the enemy was encamped close at hand, it was deemed best to take a force sufficiently large to insure success. Lieutenant-Commander Meade accordingly fitted out the Chocura's launch and first cutter, and took forty men of her crew under his personal command. The night of the 22d of January was chosen for the attempt, and as it was cold and dark, with
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
, 3 Buzzard Roost Gap, Ga. 57, 1 View 124, 5 Byhalia, Miss. 154, B11 Byram's Ford, Mo. 66, 3 Cabin Creek, Indian Territory 119, 1; 160, D8 Cabin Point, Va. 16, 1; 17, 1; 74, 1; 93, 1; 100, 1; 135-A; 137, G9 Cacapon Mountains, W. Va. 100, 1; 136, E5 Cache River, Ark. 47, 1; 135-A; 153, E8, 135-A; 153, H6; 154, A6 Cahaba River, Ala. 76, 1; 117, 1 Cairo, Ill. 117, 1; 153, C12; 171 Calcasieu Pass, La. 135-A; 157, D14 Calcasieu River, La. 52, 1; 54, 1; 135-A; 155, G1; 156, B2, 156, C1; 158, G14 Caledonia, La. 155, A6 Caledonia, Mo. 47, 1; 152, H8; 171 Calfkiller Creek, Tenn. 24, 3 Calhoun, Ga. 48, 1; 57, 1, 57, 3; 58, 1, 58, 2; 59, 3; 62, 1; 63, 4; 76, 1, 76, 2; 88, 2; 101, 10; 117, 1; 118, 1; 135-A; 149, E11 Calhoun, Ky. 118, 1; 150, B4; 151, H5 Calhoun, Mo. 152, E1; 161, F12 Calhoun, Tenn. 24, 3; 97, 1; 117, 1; 118, 1; 135-A; 142, F1; 149, B12 California (State)
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
o the office of civil sheriff of this parish, and always took an active share in politics as a becoming citizen. His wife and four sons and two daughters survive the deceased. The sons are William, Albert, Charles and Frank, the first two mentioned being married, and the daughters are Mrs. Thomas E. Waggaman, of Washington, and Mrs. Mamie Birne, of Wilmington, Delaware. For the past year or so of his life, the Colonel was engaged in experimenting upon a small farm he possessed near Lake Charles, in the hope that he might make it profitable, and it was during this period that he exposed himself injudiciously to the weather, and to too great hardships for a man of his age. The experiment was not successful, the railroad being too far away from his farm to enable him to operate it to advantage. One of the touching incidents of his late years happened at the time of the Veteran Reunion in Houston. One of the men who had been in his command at Malvern Hill proposed to go to this
bels are evacuating Richmond, and that the whole of Virginia will be abandoned. The Era thinks the defeat of Rosecrans not so bad as reported. Gold in New Orleans is at a premium of 50 cents. [third Dispatch.] Mobile, Oct. 9. --Late arrivals from Shreveport, La., state that Gen. Price is falling back towards that point, and that Gen. Taylor is falling back from Alexandria. Gen. Banks is pursuing. Banks crossed from New Orleans in three columns--one of which crosses at Lake Charles, another at Brashear City, and the third at the mouth of Red river. His force is estimated at 35,000. Steele and Blunt have about 30,000. The gunboat Rattler has destroyed all the boats on the river up as far as St. Joseph, except one belonging to negroes. All gunboats and transports are constantly fired on by our pickets. Everything is quiet in Texas. Thirty-five thousand French are reported at Matamoras, and the report is generally credited. Gen. Forrest is here o