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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 30 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 26 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 24 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 18 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 16 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 3, 1864., [Electronic resource] 16 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 10 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for Chattanooga Valley (United States) or search for Chattanooga Valley (United States) in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Notes on the Chickamauga campaign. (search)
nces if General Rosecrans had come upon the field with ammunition and the few thousand soldiers collected near Rossville? On the 21st Bragg was too prudent to attack, and on the 22d our army was placed in positions around Chattanooga. Of our men under fire, we had lost more than one-third, and a number of batteries in the woods fell to the enemy by the disaster on the morning of the 20th. About 30,000 men — both sides — were killed and wounded in this battle. On the 23d and 24th the Confederates came slowly into position on Missionary Ridge and Lookout Mountain, connecting the two by a line of earth-works across Chattanooga Valley; and, by sending a force into Lookout Valley, they commanded our 26-mile wagon route to Bridgeport for supplies. This forced us to an almost impassable mountain route of sixty miles to the same point. Knowing that it would be impossible long to subsist an army by this route, Bragg waited the process of starvation with some probability of Succe
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 9.97 (search)
tional troops were now strongly intrenched in Chattanooga Valley, with the Tennessee River behind them, the en crest for some distance south, thence across Chattanooga Valley to Lookout Mountain. Lookout Mountain was alsition to this there was an intrenched line in Chattanooga Valley extending from the river east of the town to he upper and lower palisades, and so get into Chattanooga Valley. The plan of battle was for Sherman to attHis problem was to get from Lookout Valley to Chattanooga Valley in the most expeditious way possible; cross ted to get his force past Lookout Mountain and Chattanooga Valley, and up to Missionary Ridge. By crossing theth face of Lookout the troops would come into Chattanooga Valley in rear of the line held by the enemy across where they were more wanted. After reaching Chattanooga Valley, the creek of the same name, quite a formidabver the top of the north end of the ridge, to Chattanooga Valley, then along parallel to the ridge a mile or m
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Comments on General Grant's <placeName reg="Chattanooga, Hamilton, Tennessee" key="tgn,7017496" authname="tgn,7017496">Chattanooga</placeName>. (search)
homas to execute the movement on Citico Creek which I reported on the 5th as proposed by Smith. Thomas, who rather preferred an attempt on Lookout Mountain, desired to postpone the operation until Sherman should come up, but Grant has decided that for the sake of Burnside the attack must be made at once, and I presume the advance on Citico will take place to-morrow evening, and that on Missionary Ridge immediately afterward. If successful, this operation will divide Bragg's forces in Chattanooga valley from those in the valley of the Chickamauga, and will compel him either to retreat, leaving the railroad communication of Cheatham and Longstreet exposed, or else fight a battle with his diminished forces. From General Grant's order of November 7th the following extract is made: . . I deem the best movement to attract the enemy to be an attack on the north end of Missionary Ridge with all the force you can bring to bear against it, and, when that is carried, to threaten, and ev
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The army of the Cumberland at Chattanooga. (search)
more could not well be brought up the mountain. But all the enemy's works had been taken. Hooker had carried the mountain on the east side, had opened communication with Chattanooga, and he commanded the enemy's line of defensive works in Chattanooga Valley. Colonel D. R. Hundley, of Greenbrier, Alabama, writing to the editors, May 27th, 1887, said: The impression conveyed in the above is that Osterhaus and Grose were confronted by at least a reasonably large force in their fight up the moueneral Sherman had carried Tunnel Hill, and acting in that belief, gave orders for the next day's battle. General Sherman was directed to attack the enemy at early dawn, Thomas to cooperate with him, and Hooker, to be ready to advance into Chattanooga Valley, to hold the road that zigzagged from the valley to the summit. Early the next morning, when General Grant learned that the ridge had not been carried as far as Tunnel Hill, and that Lookout Mountain had been evacuated by the enemy, he sus