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r command of Captain McLaughlin, was sent in to communicate. He brought off five of our men, including Captain Lee, (who had command of the force landed at Smithfield,) who had succeeded in making good their escape. Captain Lee informed me that in the fight of Sunday he succeeded in driving the rebels; but having received information that heavy reenforcements were coming in from Ivor station to cut him off from his advance on Chuckatuck, and also that there was a company of cavalry at Cherry Grove, he deemed it advisable to fall back on Smithfield, where he hoped to be able to communicate with General Graham in time to receive assistance before the enemy could advance in sufficient numbers to render his capture or destruction certain; but the Smith Briggs, which had been sent to his assistance, did not arrive until too late. The strength of the enemy, as reported by Captain Lee, was one regiment of infantry, one of cavalry, and one battery of artillery. Deeming any further demo
e that opposed Major-General Patterson in the Valley, and it was known as the Army of the Shenandoah. It took part in the engagement at Falling Waters, July 2d, and the skirmishes near Bunker Hill and Charlestown. Strengthened with eight Southern regiments, this army started for Manassas, on July 18th, and took part in the first battle of Bull Run. After this, it formed a part of the Confederate Army of the Potomac. General Joseph Eggleston Johnston (U. S. M. A. 1829) was born in Cherry Grove, near Farmville, Virginia, February 3, 1807. He served in the Black Hawk, Seminole, and Mexican wars, in the last of which he was twice severely wounded. He resigned his rank of brigadier-general to enter the Confederate service on April 20, 1861, and was given the rank of general in August. He was in command at Harper's Ferry after May 24th, and headed the Army of the Shenandoah. He brought his troops to Manassas and superseded Beauregard in the command, at Bull Run, joining his forc
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Massachusetts Volunteers. (search)
Moved to Portsmouth, Va., January 22. Duty there and at Getty's Station, on Norfolk & Suffolk Railroad, till April 26. Demonstration on Portsmouth March 1-5. Expedition to Isle of Wight County April 13-15. Action at Smithfield, Cherry Grove, April 14. Moved to Yorktown April 26. Butler's operations on south side of James River and against Petersburg and Richmond May 4-28. Port Walthal Junction, Chester Station, May 6-7. Swift's Creek, Arrowfield Church, May 9-10. Olk November 18, and Provost duty there till March 22, 1864. Companies A, D and K at Portsmouth, and F at Norfolk till April 15. Demonstration against Portsmouth March 4-5. Expedition to Isle of Wight County April 13-15. Smithfield, Cherry Grove, April 14. Camp near Julian Creek till April 26. Moved to Yorktown April 26. Butler's operations on south side of the James and against Petersburg and Richmond May 4-28. Port Walthal Junction, Chester Station, May 6-7. Swift Cre
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Missouri Volunteers. (search)
, Dept. of Missouri, to July, 1863. District of St. Louis, Mo., Dept. of Missouri, to April, 1865. Service. Walkerville, Mo., April 2 and 14, 1862. Cherry Grove June 26. Near Newark July 7. Whaley's Mills August 1. Kirksville August 6 (Detachment). Near Stockton August 8 (Detachment). Near Bragg's Farm S Regiment State Militia Cavalry Organized in Missouri at large January 1 to April 20, 1862. Assigned to duty in District of North Missouri. Actions at Cherry Grove June 26 and July 1. Near Memphis July 18. Newark August 1 (Detachment). Kirksville August 6 (Detachment). Near Stockton August 8 (Detachment). Cticipated in the following service: Expedition from Greenville February 23-25, 1862 (Co. B ). Mingo Creek, near St. Francisville, February 24 (Co. B ). Cherry Grove July 1. Greenville July 20 (Cos. B and G ). Greenville July 26. Scout in Southeastern Missouri July 26-29 (Detachment). Bolinger's Mills July 28 (
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New Jersey Volunteers. (search)
st 26, and at Carolina City till October 18. Moved to Newport News, Va., October 18-20, and duty there till January 31, 1864. Regiment Veteranize January 21, 1864, and Veterans on furlough January 31-March 17. Skirmishes on Ballahock or Bear Quarter Road and at Deep Creek February 29-March 1. Ballahock Station, near Dismal Swamp, March 1. Deep Creek March 2. At Portsmouth and Getty's Station till April 26. Expedition to Isle of Wight County April 13-15. Smithfield, Cherry Grove, April 14. Moved to Yorktown April 26. Butler's operations on south side of James River and against Petersburg and Richmond May 4-28. Occupation of Bermuda Hundred May 5. Port Walthal Junction May 6-7. Swift Creek May 9-10. Operations against Fort Darling May 12-16. Battle of Drury's Bluff May 14-16. Bermuda Hundred May 16-28. Moved to White House, thence to Cold Harbor May 28-June 1. Battles about Cold Harbor June 1-12. Before. Petersburg June 15-18. S
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New York Volunteers. (search)
House to South Anna Bridge July 1-7. Action at South Anna Bridge July 4. Expedition to Gloucester Court House July 25. Duty at Yorktown and vicinity till October, and at Portsmouth and vicinity till March, 1864. Wistar's Expedition against Richmond February 6-8, 1864. Ballahoe or Bear Quarter Road and Deep Creek February 29-March 1. Demonstration against Portsmouth March 4-5. Moved to Yorktown March 17. Expedition to Isle of Wight County April 13-15. Smithfield, Cherry Grove, April 14. Butler's operations on south side of the James River and against Petersburg and Richmond May 4-28. Occupation of Bermuda Hundred and City Point May 5. Port Walthall Junction, Chester Station, May 7. Swift Creek or Arrowfield Church May 9-10. Operations against Fort Darling May 12-16. Battle of Drury's Bluff May 14-16. Bermuda Hundred May 16-28. Moved to White House, thence to Cold Harbor May 27-31. Battles about Cold Harbor June 1-12. Before Peters
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
Cheek's Cross-Roads, Tenn. 24, 3; 118, 1 Chehaw Station, Ala. 117, 1; 135-A; 148, E9 Cheney's, Ga. 48, 1; 57, 3; 59, 3; 60, 1; 65, 2, 65, 3; 88, 2 Cheneyville, La. 52, 1; 54, 1; 155, H3; 156, A3 Cheraw, S. C. 76, 2; 79, 3; 80, 6, 80, 7; 86, 6; 117, 1; 118, 1; 135-A; 143, A13; 171 Cherokee Agency, Indian Territory 171 Cherokee Reserve, Ark. 154, A1; 159, A13 Cherokee Station, Ala. 117, 1; 149, D3 Cherry Creek, Miss. 154, D13 Cherry Grove, Va. 93, 1 Cherry Run, W. Va. 27, 1; 116, 2 Cherry Valley, Tenn. 24, 3; 30, 2; 150, G7 Chesapeake Bay 135-A; 137; 171 Cheshire, Ohio 140, F6; 141, A8 Chess wagons: Drawings 106, 1 Chesser's Store, Ky. 150, A10; 151, G11 Chester, S. C. 117, 1; 118, 1; 142, H11; 143, A9; 171 Chesterfield, S. C. 76, 2; 80, 6; 117, 1; 118, 1; 135-A; 138, H1; 139, A3; 142, H14; 143, A13 Chesterfield County, Va.: Section of 135, 3 Chester Gap,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memorial services in Memphis Tenn., March 31, 1891. (search)
eemer liveth, and ending with the Lord's Prayer, in the recital of which he was joined by the audience. The choir and orchestra then rendered Nearer, My God, to Thee, and on its conclusion Congressman Patterson introduced Colonel Luke W. Finlay, and remarked that the memorial that would be read by him had been prepared by five comrades who had followed General Johnston in the fortunes of war. The memorial follows. His life in detail. General Joseph E. Johnston was born in Cherry Grove, Va., February 3, 1807, and died in Washington City, D. C., March 21, 1891, in the eighty-fifth year of his age. He was graduated at the United States Military Academy at West Point, in the same class with General Lee, in 1829, and was commisssioned second lieutenant of the artillery. His service in military and topographical duty was continuous in that rank until 1836, when he was promoted to first lieutenancy of artillery and made aid-de-camp to General Winfield Scott in the Seminole war
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Yankee gunboat Smith Briggs. from the Times-dispatch, March 18, 1906, and July 15, 1906. (search)
l companies of North Carolina infantry, and with a few cavalrymen of that State, went down to Cherry Grove, about ten miles from Smithfield, where he had a splendid and unobstructed view of the whole t he might see and report anything and everything that was going on. While he was going to Cherry Grove the Smith Briggs was bringing Captain Lee and his men to Smithfield for a similar purpose. Td by Captain Sturdivant, and were entirely unsuspected by him. On Sturdivant's return from Cherry Grove, he suddenly, and to his amazement, ran into the forces under Captain Lee, at Six Oaks, near rdivant's battery of Artillery, but was not present at Smithfield; was with those who went to Cherry Grove the day before, and as Mr. Rodgers expressed the wish that some one would give an account of forty-seven); also about one dozen cavalrymen, who were to act as pickets. We remained at Cherry Grove until after high tide, and on our return were met by a cavalryman on top of the hill before r
emond river has a number of gunboats in it, and thieving parties frequently go ashore to annoy the citizens along the river. On Thursday last some Confederate scouts secreted themselves near the mouth of Chuckstuck Creek, and fired upon a party of Kankees, killing two and wounding others. On Saturday, Cherry Grove, a well known farm on the river, owned by Richard H. Riddick, was shelled and the house much injured. The Yankees threaten to burn Cherry Grove, if their men are again fired upon. emond river has a number of gunboats in it, and thieving parties frequently go ashore to annoy the citizens along the river. On Thursday last some Confederate scouts secreted themselves near the mouth of Chuckstuck Creek, and fired upon a party of Kankees, killing two and wounding others. On Saturday, Cherry Grove, a well known farm on the river, owned by Richard H. Riddick, was shelled and the house much injured. The Yankees threaten to burn Cherry Grove, if their men are again fired upon.
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