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of Christmas eve, will bring tears to the eyes of many a poor fellow shivering over the camp-fire in this winter season. The children in the crib, the stockings in which Santa Claus deposits his treasures, recall the pleasantest night of the year. Speaking of Christmas reminds me of the mistletoe bough. Mistletoe abounds here. Old, leafless trees are covered and green with it. It was in blossom a week or two ago, if we may call its white wax-like berries blossoms. They are known as Christmas blossoms. The vine takes root in the bark — in any crack, hole, or crevice of the tree-and continues green all winter. The berries grow in clusters. January, 16 I have as guests Mr. and Mrs. Johnson House, my old neighbors. They have come from their quiet home in Ohio to look over a battle-field, and I take pleasure in showing them the points of interest. Mr. House, with great frankness, tells me, in the presence of my staff, that he had been afraid I was not qualified for the hi
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 3: a cavalry officer of the army of the United States. (search)
y, and calls for their early disbandment. They may suit themselves in everything relating to my services, and whenever they tell me they are no longer required they will not be obtruded on them. Two months later Lieutenant-Colonel Lee was at Fort Brown, Texas, with thoughts filled with the approaching Christmas and his family's happiness. He Writes in December, 1856: The time is approaching when I trust many of you will be assembled around the family hearth at dear Arlington another Christmas. Though absent, my heart will be in the midst of you, and I shall enjoy in imagination and memory all that is going on. May nothing occur to mar or cloud the family fireside, and may each be able to look back with pride and pleasure at their deeds of the past year, and with confidence and hope to that in prospect. I can do nothing but hope and pray for you all. Last Saturday I visited Matamoras, Mexico, for the first time. The town looked neat, though much out at the elbow, and nothing
verything that flies in the air, swims in the sea, grows out of the ground, or upon tree or vine, contributed to the abundance laid upon the table for the Thanksgiving dinner. In almost every home family parties gathered together to utter their gratitude to a bountiful Providence, and to feast upon the good things set before them. It must be confessed that there was sometimes indulgence beyond the proprieties. But the holiday of all the year was blessed Christmas-tide, extending from Christmas to and including New Year's Day. For weeks before parents and children would lay aside, with scrupulous care and great secrecy, all they could for Christmas; and none was so poor as to be indifferent to the influence of the pretty custom of remembering loved ones with some token at Christmas. We have watched the simple folk in their preparations for this day with moistened eyes, because of the touch of heavenly love that pervaded all their efforts. They little knew themselves how muc
, Michigan, a devoted friend of General Logan, invited the general and myself to accompany him for the series. They were a rare treat. Notwithstanding Mr. Dickens's monotonous style of reading, the innate drollery of the man, manifested in his intonations and gestures, made his readings very interesting. Beginning February 6 with Doctor Marigold, and the trial scene from Pickwick, he also read extracts from Nicholas Nickleby, Old curiosity shop, Martin Chuzzlewit, Dombey and son and The Christmas carol, using precisely the same intonations for every character, whether pathetic or comic. During his stay he was entertained by Charles Sumner and many other distinguished people, enjoying particularly walking about the city at night with Captain Kelly, Charles Sumner, and Mr. Stanton. He was the guest of Sir Edward Thornton, the English minister, who had succeeded Sir Frederick Bruce on the death of that illustrious diplomat. Dickens carried away, as a result of his readings in Am
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 10: (search)
days of adversity. Nothing she could do for these dear friends, who had been so much to her before fortune had smiled upon them, seemed onerous. Her only grief was that the President could not provide each one of the many with lucrative positions, and thereby improve their conditions in life. Many sought her aid, and were never turned away impatiently. She at least made an appeal for them. Every member of President Grant's cabinet had stories to tell of Mrs. Grant's kind heart. Every Christmas the asylums, hospitals, and charitable institutions in Washington received donations from Mrs. Grant, while the members of her family and her friends and their children were most generously remembered. She was the veritable Lady bountiful in more than one household. Her greatest fault, if she had faults, was her extreme leniency. She could never discipline either her servants or her children, her kind heart always suggesting some excuse for misdemeanors or neglect of duty. She was nev
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 12: (search)
state dining-room for the luncheon which Mrs. Grant had provided for the large party accompanying the President, he insisted upon taking Jack with him. It was a red-letter day in the dear boy's life, and he used to tell it to all of his school friends with a good deal of satisfaction. It spoke volumes for the kind heart of General Grant. Jack was always proud of being a favorite with the President and Mrs. Grant, who never forgot him at Christmas, but always sent him some beautiful Christmas gift. He was her champion and made many speeches in eulogy of Mrs. Grant, which were reported to her and caused her to be very strongly attached to him as long as she lived. The afternoon was spent by everybody in trying to get warm. The inaugural committee had made most extensive preparations for the inaugural ball. They had built a temporary marquee on Judiciary Square. It was magnificently decorated and extensive enough to have accommodated the thousands whom the committee expect
the truth. There are some yet, however, who affect to believe that we shall have a peace before we have a fight. The reaction so long predicted at the North having begun, the circulating petitions of merchants, bankers, clergymen, and other citizens of New York, which are pressing their peaceful influences upon Abraham Lincoln, are also operating here. The question is already being discussed in its various bearings, and the auspicious event has even been assigned a place this side of Christmas. We have no idea, however, of giving up the contest without, at least, one grand exhibition of the power, the prowess, and the resources of the people who have been stigmatized as the ruffian rebels of the South. We went into the war on principle. Let us come out on principle, but not until we have left a mark upon our enemies that will secure for us for all time to come the respect of the world. The hundred thousand men we have in the field will not be content to lay down their ar
harleston Courier says:-- There are some who affect to believe that we shall have a peace before we have a fight. The reaction so long predicted at the North having begun, the circulating petitions of merchants, bankers, clergymen, and other citizens of New York, which are pressing their peaceful influences upon Abraham Lincoln, are also operating here. The question is already being discussed in its various bearings, and the auspicious event has even been assigned a place this side of Christmas. We have no idea, however, of giving up the contest without, at least, one grand exhibition of the power, the prowess, and the resources of the people who have been stigmatized as the ruffian rebels of the South. We went into the war on principle; let us come out on principle, but not until we have left a mark upon our enemies that shall secure for us for all time to come the respect of the world. The hundred thousand men we have in the field will not be content to lay down their arms
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore), A friendly interview between pickets. (search)
he rebel, and he handed it to Alex. I am much obliged to you, Georgia Legion, for I wouldn't part with it for all the Southern Confederacy. I was a little curious to know something further of the book, so I asked Alex. to let me see it. He passed it to me. I opened it, and on the fly-leaf saw written in a neat hand: My Christmas-gift, to Alex.----, December 25th, 1860. Ella. Well, Alex., said I, it's not often one has the same gift presented to him a second time. True, Captain; and if I could but see the giver of that to-day, there's but one other gift I would want. What's that, Alex.? This rebellion played out, and my discharge in my pocket. The boys had all been busily talking to our rebel friend, who, seeing a horseman approaching in the direction of his post, bid us a hasty good-by, and made as quick a trip as possible across the Rappahannock. Night came on, and those not on duty lay down on the frozen ground, to dream of other Christmas nights, when we knew not war.
ursel's. Do you work for your boss, or are you hired out? I asked. I works for de boss. What kind of time do you have with him? Bery hard mass'r, bery hard. He works us all day, and neber ‘lows us anyding for oursel's at all from Christmas to Christmas. What! Don't he give you a present at Christmas? No, mass'r, not a cent. Some bosses do ‘low someding at Christmas; but not my boss. He doesn't even gib us ‘bacca to chaw. He was carrying a bag in which his day's provising, pumping, wood cutting, engine firing, and in other necessary labors along the line. These men are the most favored sons of Africa employed in the country, in the States of Alabama or Georgia. They are hard worked from sun to sun, and from Christmas to Christmas, but they are well fed and clothed, and comfortably lodged — comfortably, that is, for negro slaves. Their allowance. They receive five pounds of pork, a pint of molasses, and one peck of meal each per week; three suits of c
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