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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men, chapter 53 (search)
ration of Christmas presents is becoming a very arduous matter. For many well-to-do households, especially in the suburbs of large cities, it absorbs an alarming amount of time and strength, even endangering, in many cases, health itself. The Christmas trade, which formerly kept the retail shops crowded for a week, now fills and overfills them for nearly six weeks, and during December the simplest purchase involves such confusion and difficulty as to take hours instead of minutes, and to drive even experienced shoppers to despair. Many a family seriously contemplates each year the alternative of foregoing all Christmas presents, rather than grapple with the formidable task involved. There are the children's stockings to be filled, something really pretty and appropriate to be got for Uncle John, and just the right thing to be selected for that unsatisfactory corner in Cousin Mary's drawing-room. Day after day passes; nobody can find time to go to the city, or, if some one goes,
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 11: last years.—1877-79. (search)
re your fond mother and my own. It is something curious that, while my mother was only fortyseven years old when she died, and I am now seventy-three, I feel my filial impulses bounding within me as though I were again a child, whenever I think of the possibility of coming into her presence; and though our ages are reversed according to earthly dates, there still seems to be the same relative distance between us, as to the point of time, that existed when she was here in the body. The Christmas holidays were again spent by him 1878. New York, and he came back apparently much brightened and refreshed by the week with his children and grandchildren there. Both in December and January he plied 1878-79. his pen busily. The suppression of the colored vote at the South, and the helplessness of the blacks under the new regime, constantly engaged his thoughts, and four letters from him on the subject were printed during January. N. Y. Tribune, Jan. 4 and 25, 1879; Boston Advertise
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 15: mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord 1908-1910; aet. 89-91 (search)
approach to a secretary ever tolerated. We used to grieve because our mother had no firstrate Crutch ; it seemed a waste of power. Now, we see that it was partly the instinct of selfpreservation,--keeping the doing muscles tense and strong, because action was vital and necessary to her — partly the still deeper instinct of giving her self, body and mind. She seldom failed in any important thing she undertook; the chores of life she often left for others to attend to or neglect. The Christmas services, the Christmas oratorio, brought her the usual serene joy and comfort. She insists that Handel wrote parts of the Messiah in heaven itself. Where else could he have got Comfort ye, Thy rebuke, Thou shalt break them, and much besides? Late in December, 1908, came the horror of the Sicilian earthquake. She felt at first that it was impossible to reconcile omnipotence and perfect benevolence with this catastrophe. We must hold judgment in suspense and say, We don't and we ca
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing), chapter 10 (search)
eply in the same spirit in which I asked. Several, however, expressed a wish to see me alone, as they could then say all, which they could not bear to before one another. I shall go there again, and take time for this. It is very gratifying to see the influence these few months of gentle and intelligent treatment have had upon these women; indeed, it is wonderful. So much were her sympathies awakened by this visit, that she rejoiced in the opportunity, soon after offered, of passing Christmas with these outcasts, and gladly consented to address the women in their chapel. There was, says one present, a most touching tenderness, blended with dignity, in her air and tone, as, seated in the desk, she looked round upon her fallen sisters, and begun: To me the pleasant office has been given, of wishing you a happy Christmas. A simultaneous movement of obeisance rippled over the audience, with a murmured Thank you; and a smile was spread upon those sad countenances, like sunr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
nner, when his duty did not forbid it, as willingly as he would the reverse, when the long roll sounded, or the call was—duty. Of a genial disposition, graceful manners, and air of savoir faire, mingled with a certain amount of recklessness, and a lover of good things, he was at once installed, by virtue of military precedence and age, the ruler of the feast. In fancy I can see the happy faces that gathered around the table and responded to the toast, Our Dixie Land. Alas! ere another Christmas had come around some of them had paid the soldier's debt—friends were scattered, and other scenes were being enacted. For us there was but one Christmas of the four we spent in service at Stuart's tavern; and of those who answered to the roll-call that day, how many could now answer Here! The gallant Wheat fell in the battle of Cold Harbor in June, 1862; Colonel Drake fell at the head of the Old First, at Falling Waters, on the retreat from Gettysburg. The others did their part, and som
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A reminiscence of the Christmas of 1861. (search)
nner, when his duty did not forbid it, as willingly as he would the reverse, when the long roll sounded, or the call was—duty. Of a genial disposition, graceful manners, and air of savoir faire, mingled with a certain amount of recklessness, and a lover of good things, he was at once installed, by virtue of military precedence and age, the ruler of the feast. In fancy I can see the happy faces that gathered around the table and responded to the toast, Our Dixie Land. Alas! ere another Christmas had come around some of them had paid the soldier's debt—friends were scattered, and other scenes were being enacted. For us there was but one Christmas of the four we spent in service at Stuart's tavern; and of those who answered to the roll-call that day, how many could now answer Here! The gallant Wheat fell in the battle of Cold Harbor in June, 1862; Colonel Drake fell at the head of the Old First, at Falling Waters, on the retreat from Gettysburg. The others did their part, and som
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), How the Southern soldiers kept House during the war. (search)
est. Instead of doing as I directed him, he hastily gathered up in the table-cloth, coffee-pot, sugar-dish, etc., and, with much agitation, said: Lord, Marse William, this ain't no place to eat breakfast! and he and his ambulance were gone in a twinkling. To Joe's good management I can say what probably few other men can say — I suffered only one day in the four years for food, and that was the day I was separated from him. Till Joe's death, some years ago, we were great friends. Every Christmas he brought me a turkey, and would say to my wife: Miss Ella, me and Marse William was jest like brothers in the war. His wife continues to eat her Christmas dinner at my house. Another piece of good luck, perhaps more remarkable than this, was that in the four years I was in the Army I did not once get wet. I captured early in the war an excellent oil-cloth, made like a Spanish poncho, with a hole in the centre. With this on, and a slouch hat that turned the rain like a tin roof, and a
Rock. Address at Framingham. The convention after two days session, adopted resolutions endorsing Mr. Brooks' views. At all the conventions Mr. Brooks attended and where he spoke, it was his custom to have resolutions adopted, and these resolutions he prepared beforehand, so there was a unanimity in the demands. This Plymouth convention was followed in quick succession during December by others at Hingham, Duxbury, New Bedford, Fairhaven and Bridgewater. Evidently there was then no Christmas rush. He must have been satisfied with the response at these meetings, for again he calls another convention; this time it is for the specific purpose of securing for the Old Colony a seminary for teachers. The call was dated January 5, 1837, and was for a convention at Halifax on January 24, 1837. But after this call was issued and before the convention was held, a couple of events happened which satisfied Mr. Brooks that his work had not been in vain. The first was the interrogativ
Ladies' fair. --The ladies of the Second Baptist Church are holding a Fair at Mechanics' Institute Hall, where they are displaying on their sales-tables a vast number of useful and pretty articles, as well as any amount of tempting viands of various sorts. Parents and others may now buy toys and other Christmas gifts for their children and friends, and at the same time aid the ladies in their noble and benevolent work.
Horrible murder. --On Monday last, Lucius T. Woodruff, a planter, living about five miles from Weldon, N. C., was seized by five of his slaves, taken into an adjoining wood, and his head chopped off with an axe. The body was discovered on Friday, and the negroes were arrested. According to their confession, the murder was perpetrated because their master refused to allow gangs of negroes from other plantations to visit his farm during Christmas. He was seized at his dwelling, and, notwithstanding his entreaties, was taken to the woods and inhumanly butchered. Great excitement prevailed at Weldon Saturday, and it was thought the murderers would be summarily executed.
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