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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 8 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 2, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 2 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 2 2 Browse Search
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Rangers and two pieces of artillery, under the command of Colonel Craven, resulting, after an engagement of about an hour's duration, in a rout of the rebels with a loss of eight men killed and the whole of their camp equipments left in the hands of the Nationals.--(Doc. 17.) General Grant sent the following message from his headquarters at Jackson, Tenn., to the War Department: The following despatch is just received from Brigadier-General Davis, at Columbus, Ky.: The expedition to Clarkson, Mo., thirty-four miles from Madrid, under command of Captain Rodgers, company K, Second Illinois artillery, has been entirely successful in dispersing the guerrillas, killing ten, and mortally wounding two, capturing Colonel Clark in command, Captain Esther, three lieutenants, three surgeons, thirty-seven men, seventy stand of arms, fifty-two horses, thirteen mules, two wagons and a large quantity of ammunition, burning their barracks and magazines, entirely breaking up the whole camp.
9  Mississippi battery (Swett)73  Tennessee battery (Baxter)73   2,376 Second Brigade. Brig. Gen. P. R. Cleburne commanding. 15th Arkansas223  2d Tennessee372  5th Tennessee429  23d Tennessee377  24th Tennessee406  48th Tennessee353  Clarkson's (Arkansas) battery 58  Trigg's (Arkansas) battery58   2,276 Third Brigade. Brig. Gen. S. A. M. Wood commanding. 16th Alabama386  8th Arkansas272  33d Mississippi378  27th Tennessee226  44th Tennessee489  Company Georgia cavalry (Aver Brig. Gen. P. R. Cleburne commanding.Col. J. S. Marmaduke commanding. 15th Arkansas.3d Confederate. 2d Tennessee.25th Tennessee. 5th Tennessee.29th Tennessee. 23d Tennessee.37th Tennessee. 24th Tennessee.Baker's battery. 48th Tennessee.  Clarkson's battery.  Trigg's battery.  reserve Corps. Maj. Gen. John C. Breckinridge commanding. First Brigade.Third Brigade. Brig. Gen. J. M. Hawes commanding.Brig. Gen. B. H. Helm commanding. Battalion, Alabama.9th Arkansas. 31
active and determined war. The idea of counteracting, and ultimately suppressing, the Slave-Trade, through a systematic colonization of the western coast of Africa with emancipated blacks from America, was matured and suggested by him to others, even before the outbreak of the Revolutionary war; and its realization, interrupted by that struggle, was resumed by him directly after it had been closed. This was anterior to the British settlement of Sierra Leone, and preceded the appearance of Clarkson's prize essay, commanding public attention to the horrors of the Slave-Trade. Among Dr. Hopkins's European correspondents were Granville Sharp and Zachary Macaulay, who were among the earliest and least compromising of British abolitionists. Through his influence and efforts, three colored youth were educated in New England, toward the close of the last century, with express reference to missionary labor in Africa in connection with the Colonization movement. Two of these ultimately, tho
nd 1763. In 1774, the Philadelphia meeting directed that all persons engaged in any form of slave-trading be disowned; and in 1776 took the decisive and final step by directing that the owners of slaves, who refused to execute the proper instruments for giving them their freedom, be disowned likewise. This blow hit the nail on the head. In 1781, but one case requiring discipline under this head was reported; and in 1783, it duly appeared that there were no slaves owned by its members. Clarkson's History. The coincidence of these later dates with the origin, progress, and close of our Revolutionary struggle, is noteworthy. The New York and Rhode Island yearly meetings passed almost simultaneously through the same stages to like results; that of Virginia pursued a like course; but, meeting greater obstacles, was longer in overcoming them. It discouraged the purchasing of slaves in 1766; urgently recommended manumission in 1773; yet, so late as 1787, its annual reports stated that
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Illinois Volunteers. (search)
eptember 6, 1862. Moved to Paducah, Ky., September 6, thence to Columbus, Ky., September 17, and duty there till November 21. Expedition from Columbus to Covington, Durhamsville and Fort Randolph September 28-October 5. Expedition to Clarkson, Mo., October 6. Expedition to New Madrid, Mo., October 21. Skirmishes at Clarkson, Mo., October 23 and 28. Moved to Moscow, Miss., November 21, and join Quinby's Command. Grant's Central Mississippi Campaign. Operations on the MissisClarkson, Mo., October 23 and 28. Moved to Moscow, Miss., November 21, and join Quinby's Command. Grant's Central Mississippi Campaign. Operations on the Mississippi Central R. R. November 21-December 30. Duty on line of the Memphis and Charleston R. R. till January 10, 1863. At Memphis, Tenn., till February 24. Yazoo Pass Expedition, by Moon Lake, Yazoo Pass and the Coldwater and Tallahatchie Rivers February 24-April 8. Operations against Fort Pemberton and Greenwood March 13-April 5. Fort Pemberton near Greenwood March 11-16-25-April 2 and 4. Moved to Milliken's Bend, La., and guard duty from Milliken's Bend to New Carthage till A
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 7: the World's Convention.—1840. (search)
and affecting. The delegates, full of deference and admiration, forbore to applaud the veteran, whose nerves were not equal to the excitement; even the customary cheers for O'Connell were withheld on his entering to make the first address. On Clarkson's departure, his place was supplied by a temporary chairman, whereupon Wendell Phillips rose to move a committee of five to prepare a Lib. 10.118, 119. correct list of members, with instructions to include the names of all persons bearing credeh a letter against the Colonization Society, if I can. He says Cresson deceived him. Mr. Garrison's engagements prevented his making the intended visit, but in September he had the supreme gratification of publishing in the Liberator (10.154) Clarkson's renunciation of the Colonization Society. He apologized for any shortcomings in his reception of Mr. Garrison in 1833, and showed both how Cresson had hoodwinked him, and how he had regained a clear vision as to the diabolical scheme. This i
Society (American), 1.90, founded by R. Finley, 324; typical supporters, 296, 346; distrusted by Lundy, 91, 97; commended by G., 107, 142, his address in its behalf, 124, 126, 137, his disillusion, 147; endeavor to get State and national aid, 148, 261; exposed by C. Stuart, 262; first formal warning from G., 262, assailed in Thoughts on Colonization, 290-302; deserters, 1.299, 2.154; rebuffed in Congress, 1.303; addressed by A. T. Judson, 323; its agents' malignity to G., 323-325; garbles Clarkson's letter of approval, 328; efforts to prevent G.'s going to England, 325, 342; protest from Wilberforce, etc., 360, 361, 365; libel on the free blacks, 374; called a humbug by O'Connell, 377, 380; persecution of G., 388; deficit, 421; aid from G. Smith, 2.52; instigates abolition mobs, 1.447, 448; mobbed in Boston, 448-450; houseless in Providence, 450; loses church collections, 450, and G. Smith, 1.299, 2.87; renounced by Clarkson, 2.388. Colored people, free, disabilities and persecut
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 8 (search)
is it not singular that the name of William Lloyd Garrison has never been pronounced on the floor of the United States Congress linked with any epithet but that of contempt! No one of those men who owe their ideas, their station, their audience, to him, have ever thought it worth their while to utter one word in grateful recognition of the power which called them into being. When obliged, by the course of their argument, to treat the question historically, they can go across the water to Clarkson and Wilberforce,--yes, to a safe salt-water distance. [Laughter.] As Daniel Webster, when he was talking to the farmers of Western New York, and wished to contrast slave labor and free labor, did not dare to compare New York with Virginia,--sister States, under the same government, planted by the same race, worshipping at the same altar, speaking the same language,--identical in all respects, save that one in which he wished to seek the contrast; but no; he compared it with Cuba,--[cheers
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 6: the genius of Universal emancipation.1829-30. (search)
ance of the paper as conducted by them. In a department of the Genius which he styled the Black List, and which bore at its head the figure of a chained and kneeling negro, This figure, originally designed for the seal of the Committee for the Abolition of the Slave Trade, in October, 1787, had a powerful influence in kindling anti-slavery sentiment in Great Britain, and was, with its direct and pathetic appeal, no less an inspiration and incentive to the American abolitionists. (See Clarkson's History of the slave trade, Chapter XX:) with the motto, Am I not a Man and a Brother? Mr. Garrison recorded each week some of the terrible incidents of slavery,—instances of cruelty and torture, cases of kidnapping, advertisements of slave auctions, and descriptions of the horrors of the foreign and domestic slave trade. By common consent of the principal maritime nations, the foreign slave trade was now adjudged felony, and their navies united in efforts for its suppression. When the
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 10: Prudence Crandall.—1833. (search)
ountry and their unexpected allies. The subsequent formation of a society in the United States for immediate emancipation was still more cheering: I did indeed feel it as a cordial to my heart, wrote James Lib. 3.7. Cropper to Arnold Buffum in August, 1832. Meantime Elliott Cresson's activity among the wealthy and philanthropic denomination of which Cropper was so admirable a representative, was practically unchecked, though his unscrupulousness had been discovered. He lost no time Clarkson's Strictures on Life of Wilberforce, and Wilberforce's letter to Clarkson, Oct. 10, 1831. after his arrival out In the summer of 1831. (See African Repository for November; also, Harriet Martineau's Autobiography, 1.149.) in visiting Wilberforce, whom he failed to convince of the practicability of transporting the blacks to Liberia; and the blind Clarkson, whom he deceived by the most outrageous fictions in regard to the emancipatory intentions and influence of the Society, and committe
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