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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 34 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 20 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Operations in east Tennessee and south-west Virginia. (search)
red most of the force with all their camp-equipage, horses, artillery, and transportation. General Jones, who had gone around to the rear of the Federals, intercepted some two hundred fugitives. A few escaped across the river. In May, 1864, a formidable force under General Crook: advanced up the Kanawha and New rivers and reached the railroad at Dublin, in Pulaski County. An inferior force, commanded by General Albert G. Jenkins, engaged the advancing Federals on the 9th of May at Cloyd's Mountain, and Jenkins was mortally wounded and his force defeated. General Crook destroyed the depot at Dublin and the large bridge over New River. On the 10th of May a large cavalry Brigadier-General Jacob Ammen, U. S. V. From a photograph. General Ammen commanded the District of east Tennessee, April 10, 1864, to January 14, 1865. force, under General Averell, made an advance on Wytheville, but was met at Crockett's Cove by General John H. Morgan and defeated, leaving forty dead on the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sigel in the Shenandoah Valley in 1864. (search)
d to Winchester on the 1st of May, while the cavalry advanced to Cedar Creek and Strasburg. To meet the wishes of General Crook, the cavalry force left at Beverly was sent forward into Pocahontas County, spreading false rumors as to our strength and movements. General Crook, with the principal force, of from 7000 to 8000 men, left Fayette, not far from the mouth of New River, on the 2d of May, moving by Raleigh Court House and Princeton toward Newbern, meeting and beating the enemy at Cloyd's Mountain, then again near Dublin and Newbern, and after destroying the bridge over New River and the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad for a considerable distance, returned by Union and Lewisburg to Meadow Bluff, where he arrived on the 19th of May. General Averell, at the head of two thousand cavalry, moved on a more western line against Saltville, with the intention of destroying the salt-works at that place, but, in spite of fighting bravely at that point and at Wytheville, was forced to withdr
ng was done in Arkansas while on Steele's Expedition, during which a general engagement occurred at Jenkins' Ferry, on the Saline River. In this action the corps lost 64 killed, 378 wounded, and 86 missing; total, 528. General Samuel A. Rice, commanding the First Brigade of Salomon's (1st) Division, was mortally wounded in this battle. At this time the corps was composed of 17 regiments of infantry, 5 batteries of light artillery, and 10 regiments of cavalry. Eighth Corps. Cloyd's Mountain New Market Piedmont Lynchburg Monocacy Island Ford Carter's Farm Martinsburg Halltown Winchester Berryville Opequon Fisher's Hill Cedar Creek. These battles, which occurred between May 9th and October 19th, 1864, were fought wholly, or in part, by the Army of West Virginia, which was, for the most part, identical with the forces in the two divisions under General George Crook. These two divisions, by a provisional arrangement, formed a part of the Eighth Corps, and even
ome at the expiration of its three years, these reenlisted veterans, together with the recruits, were organized into two regiments,--the One Hundred and Ninetieth and One Hundred and Ninety-first Pennsylvania--which served until the war ended. The battle of Bethesda Church, June 1, 1864, was the last action in which the Reserves, as a division, were engaged. Two of the Reserve regiments served in West Virginia during the early part of 1864, distinguishing themselves at the battle of Cloyd's Mountain. The eleven remaining regiments were formed into two brigades, constituting Crawford's (3d) Division, Fifth Corps. Sykes's Division. Another division remarkable for superiority in discipline and efficiency, was Sykes's Division of Regulars. The regular troops of the United States Army-serving in the Army of the Potomac were formed into one division of two brigades, under command of Major-General George Sykes, who was succeeded in 1863 by General Romeyn B. Ayres. This division
tion, Dec. 17, 1862, W. Va. 1 Fisher's Hill, Va. 3 Morris's Mills, W. Va., July 31, 1863 2 Cedar Creek, Va. 15 Cloyd's Mountain, W. Va. 35 Cabletown, Va. 1 Lynchburg, Va. 2     Present, also, at Carnifex Ferry, W. Va.; Princeton, W. Vach it encamped at Charlestown, W. Va., during the year 1863, and in the spring of 1864. The Twenty-third thought at Cloyd's Mountain, and then served during the summer of 1864 in Crook's Corps, of Hunter's Army. In the fall of 1864 it plarticipated 1 Opequon, Va. 17 Callahan Station, Va. 1 Fisher's Hill, Va. 3 Jeffersonville, Va. 1 Cedar Creek, Va. 8 Cloyd's Mountain, Va. 7 Beverly, W. Va. 6 Cove Mountain Gap, Va. 2 Guerillas 3 Buchanan, Va. 1 Place unknown 2 Present, alsenn. 1 Berryville, Va. 7 Chickamauga, Ga. 26 Opequon, Va. 8 Mission Ridge, Tenn. 24 Fisher's Hill, Va. 1 Cloyd's Mountain, Va. 7 Cedar Creek, Va. 8 Lexington, W. Va. 2 Cabletown, Va., Nov. 19, 1864 3 Lynchburg, Va. 2 Guerillas 1 Ca
        May 10, 1864.             148th Pennsylvania Barlow's Second 23 177 -- 200 Spotsylvania, Va.             May 18, 1864.             164th New York Gibbon's Second 12 66 14 92 Spotsylvania, Va.             May 19, 1864.             1st Maine H. Artillery Tyler's Second 81 395 5 481 1st Mass. H. Artillery Tyler's Second 50 312 28 390 Arrowfield Church, Va.             May 9, 1864.             25th Massachusetts Weitzel's Eighteenth 12 49 -- 61 Cloyd's Mountain, W. Va.             May 9-10, 1864.             9th West Virginia Crook's ---------- 45 144 -- 189 23d Ohio Crook's ---------- 21 78 24 123 Yellow Tavern, Va.             May 11, 1864.             1st Michigan Cavalry Torbert's Cavalry 11 34 3 48 Drewry's Bluff, Va.             May 12-16, 1864.             3d New Hampshire Terry's Tenth 39 182 16 237 55th Pennsylvania Ames's Tenth 20
esignation of the 1st Maryland, Potomac Home Brigade (Infantry), was changed to 13th Maryland Infantry, April 8, 1865. There was a cavalry regiment, also, known as the 1st Maryland, Potomac Home Brigade. The 1st Maryland Infantry, Potomac Home Brigade, was attached to the Twelfth Corps in 1863, and was hotly engaged at Gettysburg. where it fought with the 1st Maryland C. S. A. West Virginia.--The 9th West Virginia Infantry, composed largely of refugees, was prominently engaged at Cloyd's Mountain, where it led a successful assault, but with a loss of 45 killed and 144 wounded. In this action its color-guard entered the enemy's works in advance of the line, every one of them falling, killed or wounded; and, after the fight, twenty-one men lay dead around the flags, twelve of whom were Confederates. The 2d West Virginia Infantry was changed to mounted infantry in June, 1863, and in January, 1864, to the 5th West Virginia Cavalry. The 3d Infantry was changed to mounted infantry
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 14: the greatest battles of the war — list of victories and defeats — chronological list of battles with loss in each, Union and Confederate. (search)
the attacking party, and carried the forts, or intrenched positions, by storm. Fort Harrison, Va. Marye's Heights, Va. (1863) Rappahannock Station, Va. Fort McAllister, Ga. Lookout Mountain, Tenn. Jonesboro, Ga. Fort Fisher, N. C. Cloyd's Mountain, W. Va. Fall of Petersburg, Va. Fort Blakely, Ala.     In the following battles the Confederates remained in undisturbed possession of the field, the Union armies leaving its unburied dead and many of its wounded in their hands: 243 May 12-16 Drewry's Bluff, Va 390 2,380 1,390 4,160 May 18-20 Ware Bottom Church, Va 103 796 49 948 May 21-31 Bermuda Hundred, Va 18 89 21 128 May 7-16 Cavalry engagements.Kautz's Cavalry Raid, Va 14 60 31 105 May 9, 10 Cloyd's Mountain, W. Va 108 508 72 688 May 11 Cavalry engagements.Yellow Tavern, Va 35 142 82 259 May 12 Cavalry engagements.Meadow Bridges, Va 15 128 27 170 May 15 Newmarket, Va 93 482 256 831 May 18 Bayou Glaize, La 54 261 6 321 May
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 15: Confederate losses — strength of the Confederate Armies--casualties in Confederate regiments — list of Confederate Generals killed — losses in the Confederate Navy. (search)
ing. Aggregate. Roanoke Island, N. C.             Feb. 8, 1862.             10th Connecticut Burnside's Ninth 6 49   55 Bachelor's Creek, N. C.             Feb. 1, 1864.             132d New York ---------- --------- 5 6 80 91 Meridian Raid, Miss.             Feb. 3--March 5, 1864.             47th U. S. Colored (8th La.) ---------- --------- 11 66 2 79 11th Illinois ---------- --------- 10 40 16 66 7th Indiana Cavalry ---------- --------- 11 37 36 84 Cloyd's Mountain, W. Va.             May 9, 1864.             14th West Virginia Crook's Army W. Va. 13 62 13 88 12th Ohio Crook's Army W. Va. 9 68 10 87 Shenandoah Valley, Va.             Aug. 1-31, 1864.             3d New Jersey Cavalry Wilson's Cavalry A. P. 11 73 47 131 6th New York Cavalry Merritt's Cavalry A. P. 10 43   53 17th Pennsylvania Cavalry Merritt's Cavalry A. P. 10 41 1 52 1st New York Dragoons Merritt's
errin killed; Maj.-Gen. Ed. Johnson and Brig.-Gen. Steuart captured. May 9, 1864: Varnell's Station, Ga. Union, First Div. McCook's Cav.; Confed., Wheeler's Cav. Losses: Union, 4 killed, 25 wounded, 100 captured. May 9-10, 1864: swift Creek or Arrowfield Church, Va. Union, Tenth and Eighteenth Corps, Army of the James; Confed., Gen. Beauregard's command. Losses: Union, 90 killed, 400 wounded; Confed., 500 killed, wounded, and missing. May 9-10, 1864: Cloyd's Mountain and New River bridge, Va. Union, 12th, 23d, 34th, and 36th Ohio, 9th, 11th, 14th, and 15th W. Va., 3d and 4th Pa. Reserves; Confed., Gen. A. G. Jenkins' command. Losses: Union, 108 killed, 508 wounded; Confed., 600 killed and wounded, 300 missing. May 9-25, 1864: Sheridan's Cavalry raid in Virginia, including engagements at Beaver dam Station, South Anna bridge, Ashland, and Yellow Tavern. Union, Sheridan's Cav.; Confed., Stuart's Cav. Losses: Union, 50 kil
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