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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The capture of Fort Pillow (April 12th, 1864). (search)
ch, drove in the enemly's pickets, gained possession of the outer works, and by the time I reached the field, at 10 A. A., had forced the enemy to their main fortifications, situated on the bluff or bank of the Mississippi River at the mouth of Coal Creek. . . . Assuming command, I ordered General Chalmers to advance his line and gain position on the slope, where our men would be perfectly protected from the heavy fire of artillery and musketry, as the enemy could not depress their pieces so as to keep down inside the works. After several hours' hard fighting the desired position was gained, not, however, without considerable loss. Our main line was now within an average distance of one hundred yards from the fort, and extended from Coal Creek on the right to the bluff or bank of the Mississippi River on the left. During the entire morning the gun-boat [New Era--gun-boat No. 7--Captain James Marshall] kept up a continued fire in all directions, but without effect, and being confi
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
edly, as though re-enforcements had been received. G. T. Beauregard, General, Commanding. General Braxton Bragg. Maj. Gen. Earl Van Dorn. Maj. Gen. Leonidas Polk. Maj. Gen. W. J. Hardee. Maj. Gen. J. C. Breckinridge. [inclosure H.] Memorandum of orders.headquarters Western Department, Baldwin, iss., June 6, 1862-5 p. m. I. General Van Dorn's army will start at 3 a. m. on the 7th instant on its way to Tupelo via the road from Baldwin to Priceville. It will halt for the night at Sand Creek, a distance of about 17 miles from Baldwin. It will resume its line of march the next morning at 3 a. m., and will take position for the present at Priceville, leaving a brigade at the cross of the road with the Ripley and Cotton-Gin roads, near Smith's or Brooks' house, and a cavalry force at or about the Hearn saw-mill. One brigade will be sent to Mooresville or vicinity, and a force of cavalry to guard the Twenty Mile Creek Ferry, on the road from Fulton, with a strong picket at the l
s River, on the 2d of May, and marched to Red River at the mouth of the Little Witchita, and up the right bank of the latter stream to the mouth of the Big Witchita, where they crossed Red River. Proceeding westward, between Red River and a branch of Cache Creek, they struck the north fork of Red River at the west end of the Witchita Mountains, and followed that stream to its source in the Llano Estacado, or Staked Plain. Here an excursion was made to the valley of the Canadian River, at Sand Creek, in order to verify the position of the party by the survey which had been made along that stream by Captain Marcy in 1849. They then travelled south to the Kech-ah-que-ho, or main Red River, and, leaving their train at the place where the river comes out from the bluff of the Llano Estacado, ascended it to the spring which forms its source. From this they returned down the left bank of the river to the Witchita Mountains, which were examined, and thence they proceeded to Fort Arbuckle,
hed the field, at ten o'clock, A. M., had forced the enemy to their main fortifications, situated on the bluff or bank of the Mississippi River, at the mouth of Coal Creek. The fort is an earthwork, crescent-shaped; is eight feet in height and four feet across the top, surrounded by a ditch six feet deep and twelve feet in widtion was gained, not, however, without considerable loss. Our main line was now within an average distance of one hundred yards from the Fort, and extended from Coal Creek, on the right, to the bluff or bank of the Mississippi River, on the left. During the entire morning the gunboat kept up a continuous fire in all directions,The time having expired, I directed Brigadier-General Chalmers to prepare for the assault. Bell's brigade occupied the right, with his extreme right resting on Coal Creek. McCullock's brigade occupied the left, extending from the centre to the river. Three companies of his left regiment were placed in an old rifle-pit on the le
ome eight miles from Newbern, on the Kinston Railroad. Reports from headquarters came that a force of eight or ten thousand men, with thirty pieces of artillery and some cavalry had reached a point on our flank, nearer Newbern than ourselves, and Col. Jones was ordered, if pressed, to retire on Newbern, fighting his way as he came in. Captain Douglass of the Fifth Rhode Island and one company of the Fifty-eighth Pensylvania went up the railroad, and the enemy in small force retired beyond Coal Creek. At dusk the outer pickets were driven in. Col. Arnold suggested that tattoo be beaten at several points. The cars were kept running and the enemy would suppose our force much larger than in fact it was. The scouts reported a small force within half a mile of a camp at nine o'clock. Major Tew of the Fifth Rhode Island, with the companies of Captains Gregg and Moran, and one piece of artillery, were posted to defend the road leading from the Trent road to our camp, and the other end of wh
e through the night, near the intrenched line, the troops in the vicinity shall cheer repeatedly, as though reenforcements had been received. G. T. Beauregard, General, commanding. Geo. Wm. Brent, Acting Chief of Staff. (H.) memorandum of orders. headquarters Western Department, Baldwin, June 6, 1862, 5 P. M. I. General Van Dorn's army will start at three h. A. M., on the seventh instant, on its way to Tupelo, via the road from Baldwin to Priceville. It will halt for the night at Sand Creek, a distance of about (17) seventeen miles from Baldwin. It will resume the line of march the next morning at three h. A. M., and will take position, for the present, at Priceville, leaving a brigade at the cross of the road, with the Ripley and the Cotton Gin road, near Smith or Brooks's house, and a cavalry force at or about the steam saw-mill. One brigade will be sent to Morrisville or vicinity, and a force of cavalry to guard the (20) mile creek ferry, on the road from Fulton, with a
et seq. On April 12, 1864, an attack was made by two brigades of General N. B. Forrest's force, under Brigadier General J. R. Chalmers, upon Fort Pillow. This was an earthwork on a bluff on the east side of the Mississippi, at the mouth of Coal Creek. It was garrisoned by four hundred men and six pieces of artillery. General Chalmers promptly gained possession of the outer works and drove the garrison to their main fortifications. The fort was cresent-shaped, the parapet eight feet in heront of the southeastern face of the fort, and occupied a cluster of cabins on its southern face and about sixty yards from it. The line of investment was now short and complete, within an average distance of one hundred yards. It extended from Coal Creek on the north, which was impassable, to the river bank south of the fort. In the rear were numerous sharpshooters, well posted on commanding ridges, to pick off the garrison whenever they exposed themselves. At the same time, our forces were
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Colorado, (search)
.....1860 Act erecting a new territory to be called Colorado......Feb. 28, 1861 [Name suggested by William Gilpin, first governor.] William Gilpin commissioned governor......1861 Hiram P. Bennett first delegate to Congress......1861 First legislature meets at Denver......1861 Great suffering from cold during the winter and drought during the summer of......1863 Great flood at Denver......April, 1864 Colonel Chivington, with 900 men, attacks an Indian camp at Sand Creek, Larimer county, and kills 131 persons, men, women, and children......Nov. 27, 1864 First national bank at Denver established......1865 Alexander Cummings, governor......October, 1865 Nathaniel P. Hill organizes the Boston and Colorado Smelting Company, and erects a furnace at Black Hawk, near Central City......1866 [This furnace (removed to Denver, 1879) reduces refractory ores and makes abandoned mines of value.] The State adopts for the courts the Illinois practice code. The ca
t Lake City, March 4, and chose Brigham Young governor, March 12. First General Assembly convenes......July 2, 1849 Perpetual Emigration Fund Company organized at Salt Lake......Oct. 6, 1849 City of Provo founded......1849 First number of the Deseret News published at Salt Lake City......June 15, 1850 City of Ogden laid out......August, 1850 Territory of Utah created by act of Congress......Sept. 9, 1850 Salt Lake City incorporated......January, 1851 Coal discovered on Coal Creek at Cedar City......May, 1851 Capt. J. W. Gunnison massacred by the Pah-Utes while exploring Lake Sevier, with five out of ten companions......Oct. 26, 1853 Armed Mormons compel Associate-Judge W. W. Drummond, of the United States district court, who had become unpopular, to adjourn his court sine die......February, 1856 First hand-cart emigrants reach Great Salt Lake on foot from Iowa......Sept. 26, 1856 Judge Drummond resigns......March 30, 1857 Army of Utah, sent by Presi
rt of the number of Confederate prisoners taken on that occasion, namely, six thousand seven hundred, was a greatly exaggerated statement. The enemy had now full control of the river as far down as Fort Pillow, one hundred and ten miles below Island No.10. That fort, contrary to the general opinion about it, was not so strong as its natural position indicated, nor as it had been represented to be to General Beauregard. It was situated on the east bank of the river, near the mouth of Coal Creek, and some ten miles above the Hatchie River. A little over three miles east of it, the two streams just mentioned, with their banks partially overflowed and, therefore, almost impracticable, came within a mile and a half of each other. Yet the engineers who planned the works before General Beauregard's arrival in the West had not availed themselves of this natural advantage, and, strangely enough, instead of erecting the land defenses at the point mentioned, had placed them nearer the fo
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